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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1846


         Doorway of Baalbec

      London 1846 - David Roberts' most famous work, Views in the Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt, & Nubia, was published by E. G. Moon in London between 1846 and 1849. This work is known for its extremely detailed dutone lithographed plates which depict various scenes of the Holy Land and the Middle East. Roberts journeyed to the Holy Land in 1838 where he spent much time depicting the architecture, costumes, and landscapes that he found there. The culmination of all his efforts, Views in the Holy Land., is indeed one of the greatest travel works ever completed. George Croly wrote the wonderfully descriptive text, when available, and Louis Haghe turned Roberts' drawings into the magnificent lithographs seen here. --- Overall Very Good to Excellent. There may be an occasional imperfections to be expected with age. Some of the plates have some minor paper imperfections from handling or age at the edges. Occasionally there is some very light discoloration to the sky. Please review the image carefully for condition and contact us with any questions.

      [Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books]
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         Ansicht der Klosterruine m. Fernansicht n. Dürkheim.

      - Stahlstich n. u. v. J. Buhl, dat. 1846, 24 x 30

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
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         Mehrfarbendruck in Typometrie, in 4 Blatt n. Franz Raffelsberger ( im Selbstverlag ) und bei Bermann u. Sohn in Wien, "General-Post- und Eisenbahnkarte des Kaiserthumes Oesterreich und der nächsten Grenzlaender, mit Ergaenzungen der übrigen Staaten in Europa. 6. Auflage; Landkarte in typografischen Mehrfarbendruck".

      - 1846, 77 x 96 Lexikon zur Geschichte der Kartographie p. 655; zu Raffelsberger (od. Raffelsperger) siehe ÖBL VIII/389f; ab 1837/38 stellte Raffelsberger Landkarten im typographischen Mehrfarbendruck her, zuerst die erste Auflage der hier vorliegenden Karte. Er war durch den, nicht von ihm erfundenen ("Auf dem Gebiet des typographischen Landkartendruckes kann er bestenfalls als Nacherfinder angesehen werden." ÖBL), typometrischen Landkartendruck eine kurze Zeit erfolgreich als Landkartenverleger, in dieser Zeit schuf er mehrere Kartenwerke, die wohl alle nur in kleinen meist aber mehreren Auflagen erschienen sind; "Mit seinen geograph. und kartograph. Arbeiten schuf R. die Voraussetzungen zur Belebung und Modernisierung des österr. öff. Verkehrswesens" (ebenda); zeigt detailreich die Post- und Eisenbahnverbindungen im Österreichischen Kaisertum zur Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts; mit insgesamt 6 Nebenkarten: Hauptstrasse von Rom nach Neapel; Dampfschiff-Fahrt Verbindungen von Wien und Triest nach Constantinopel und nach dem Oriente; sowie 4 "Ergänzende Übersichten Europas (Die Britischen Inseln; West- und Südeuropa; Mittel- und Nordost-Europa; Balkan); 4 Blatt nicht zusammen gesetzt, mit kleineren Randläsuren

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
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         Approach to the Fortress of Ibrim, Nubia

      London 1846 - David Roberts' most famous work, Views in the Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt, & Nubia, was published by E. G. Moon in London between 1846 and 1849. This work is known for its extremely detailed dutone lithographed plates which depict various scenes of the Holy Land and the Middle East. Roberts journeyed to the Holy Land in 1838 where he spent much time depicting the architecture, costumes, and landscapes that he found there. The culmination of all his efforts, Views in the Holy Land., is indeed one of the greatest travel works ever completed. George Croly wrote the wonderfully descriptive text, when available, and Louis Haghe turned Roberts' drawings into the magnificent lithographs seen here. --- Overall Very Good to Excellent. There may be an occasional imperfections to be expected with age. Some of the plates have some minor paper imperfections from handling or age at the edges. Occasionally there is some very light discoloration to the sky. Please review the image carefully for condition and contact us with any questions.

      [Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books]
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         A Collection of 22 Hand-Colored Illustrations on 11 Lithographic Plates from Raffenel's *Voyage dans l'Afrique occidentale comprenant l'exploration du Senegal* [Travels in West Africa, Including the Exploration of Senegal, 1843 and 1844.]

      [Paris]: Arthus Bertrand, editeur; Imp. Kaeppelin, 1846. Very Good. A complete set of 22 hand-colored illustrations on 11 lithographic plates, removed from the Atlas volume of Raffenel's Voyage dans l'Afrique Occidentale published in Paris by Arthus Bertrand in 1846. The plates are titled on the top margin: Peuples de la Senegambie with all 22 illustrations identified on the bottom margin. Landscape folios. About 13 1/4 x 10 inches, including a few at 13 1/4 x 9 1/2 inches. Modest soiling to the outer margins, light scattered foxing mostly to the outer margins and versos, very good.A complete set of "The Peoples of Senegal," lithographed after drawings by Raffenel. Anne Jean Baptiste Raffenel (1809-58) was a marine officer and colonial official, who in 1840s was commissioned by the French navy to undertake voyages of exploration into the interior of Africa. In 1843-4 he explored Bambouk, and in 1846-48 he made his way into Kaarta, the country of the Bambara, where he was held prisoner for eight months.Includes several remarkable images of indigenous African women and men in the vicinity of St. Louis and elsewere in Senegal and the Gambia. Howgego 1800-1850, W23; Priestley, France Overseas, 52; Gay, 2915.A list of all 22 identifying captions follows:[Plate 1]. Femme des environs de St. Louis; Yoloff du pays de Wallo. Costume de guerre.[2]. Femme Maure des bords du Senegal; Maure du Senegal. Costume de guerre.[3]. Jeune negre du Wallo; Coiffure particuliere des jeunes genre du Boudon Meidionale.[4]. Griot du pays de Galam. Touant du tam-tam; Costume porte par les jeunes negres. Pendant le mois qui precede la Circoncision.[5]. Samba-Coumba-Diama. Tounka du Galam; Sarracoler-Bakiri. Costume de guerre.[6]. Maure Dorviche; Negre blanc.[7]. Girot du pays de Bondou. Costume de ceremonie; Griotte du meme pays. Costume ordinaire.[8]. Mandingue du Bambouk. Costume ordinaire; Bambara. Costume de guerre.[9]. Femme Peul du village de Kouar-Basniamm; Peul du meme village. Costume de guerre.[10]. Femme Peul du village de Kouar; Peul du meme village. Costume de guerre.[11]. Mandingue du Wolli. Costume de guerre / Femme Foulah du Cantorah (Bords de la Gambie).

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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         Sammelblatt, Gesamtansicht umgeben von 10 Teilansichten, "Ansichten von Wien".

      - Stahlstich b. Artaria in Wien, 1846, einmal 14 x 20, zweimal 14 x 9,5 und achtmal 6,5 x 9,5 Nebehay-Wagner 1006; hübsches Souvenirblatt von Wien, um die Mittelansicht "Ansicht der Stadt Wien von der Glacis gegen das neue Burgthor" sind folgende zehn Darstellungen von Wien im Uhrzeigersinn angeordnet: Innerer Burgplatz (Franzensplatz), Josefsplatz, Maria am Gestade, Karlskirche mit dem Politechnischem Institut, Eingang in den Prater, Schloss Belvedere, Ferdinandsbrücke, Stephansdom, der neue Markt und der Graben; im oberenberich etwas fleckig, wenige kleinere Knicke, sonst von guter Erhaltung.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
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         Gauge Evidence The History and Prospects of the Railway System

      Edmunds and Vacher, London 1846 - Spine bumped and worn, Corners bumped & rubbed, Foxing on Title Page through Table of Contents Pages, Front Hinge weakened with webbing showing, wear and nicks on some pages. Heavy book - over 700g, may require extra postage; Gold lettering to spine, a single page, close typed, summarising the whole position with regard to "the Gauge Wars" is loosely inserted. ; 1 Colour Mp; 10.7 x 6.85 x 1.5"; 400 pages [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: C P Books Limited]
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         Monuments et vues de Bruges

      J Bufa Bruges 1846 - First Edition Bruges 1846. Original illustrated boards, litho. title and 28 colour plates, hand coloured historiated initials. Upper cover detached and held in place with opaque tape, bookplate of Edward Southwell Trafford, else an exceptionally fine and clean copy. Plates are unblemished and very fresh. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Finecopy ABA]
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         Count of Monte-Cristo

      The First English Edition in Original Cloth of The Count of Monte-CristoDUMAS, Alexandre. The Count of Monte-Cristo. With twenty illustrations, drawn on wood by M. Valentin, and executed by the most eminent English engravers, under the superintendence of Mr. Charles Heath. In two volumes. Vol. I. [II.] London: Chapman and Hall, 1846.First edition in English in book form. Two octavo volumes (8 7/8 x 5 1/2 inches; 227 x 140 mm). iv, 464; iv, 464 pp. Complete. With twenty woodcut plates (including frontispieces) by M. Valentin (designed for the English edition).Original green cloth, covers decoratively blocked in blind, spines lettered and tooled in gilt in compartments. Original pale yellow coated endpapers. Minimal bumping to extremities. A few small spots on cloth. Spines very lightly sunned. Plates in volume I with some foxing, but text very clean and volume II also very clean. A couple signatures standing proud in volume II. Previous owner's small bookplate on front pastedown of each volume. Overall an excellent copy with the gilt extremely bright and without restoration or wear of this rare and much sought-after title. Housed together in a custom cloth slipcase.The Count of Monte-Cristo first appeared in English as an illustrated serial in the London Journal earlier this same year. ìNo translatorís name is given, yet it is interesting to note that almost every successive English edition has been based upon his workî (Reed).F.W. Reed, quoting Maurice Baring, calls The Count of Monte Cristo "The most popular book in the world." The novel first appeared serially in the Parisian newspaper Le Journal des debats, from 28 August 1844 to 15 January 1846, and in fact met with tremendous success from the very first.Reed, pp. 175-176.HBS 67920.$37,500

      [Bookseller: Heritage Book Shop, LLC ]
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         A Collection of 22 Hand-Colored Illustrations on 11 Lithographic Plates from Raffenel's *Voyage dans l'Afrique occidentale comprenant l'exploration du Senegal* [Travels in West Africa, Including the Exploration of Senegal, 1843 and 1844.]

      [Paris]: Arthus Bertrand, editeur; Imp. Kaeppelin, 1846. Very Good. A complete set of 22 hand-colored illustrations on 11 lithographic plates, removed from the Atlas volume of Raffenel's Voyage dans l'Afrique Occidentale published in Paris by Arthus Bertrand in 1846. The plates are titled on the top margin: Peuples de la Senegambie with all 22 illustrations identified on the bottom margin. Landscape folios. About 13 1/4 x 10 inches, including a few at 13 1/4 x 9 1/2 inches. Modest soiling to the outer margins, light scattered foxing mostly to the outer margins and versos, very good.A complete set of "The Peoples of Senegal," lithographed after drawings by Raffenel. Anne Jean Baptiste Raffenel (1809-58) was a marine officer and colonial official, who in 1840s was commissioned by the French navy to undertake voyages of exploration into the interior of Africa. In 1843-4 he explored Bambouk, and in 1846-48 he made his way into Kaarta, the country of the Bambara, where he was held prisoner for eight months.Includes several remarkable images of indigenous African women and men in the vicinity of St. Louis and elsewere in Senegal and the Gambia. Howgego 1800-1850, W23; Priestley, France Overseas, 52; Gay, 2915.A list of all 22 identifying captions follows:[Plate 1]. Femme des environs de St. Louis; Yoloff du pays de Wallo. Costume de guerre.[2]. Femme Maure des bords du Senegal; Maure du Senegal. Costume de guerre.[3]. Jeune negre du Wallo; Coiffure particuliere des jeunes genre du Boudon Meidionale.[4]. Griot du pays de Galam. Touant du tam-tam; Costume porte par les jeunes negres. Pendant le mois qui precede la Circoncision.[5]. Samba-Coumba-Diama. Tounka du Galam; Sarracoler-Bakiri. Costume de guerre.[6]. Maure Dorviche; Negre blanc.[7]. Girot du pays de Bondou. Costume de ceremonie; Griotte du meme pays. Costume ordinaire.[8]. Mandingue du Bambouk. Costume ordinaire; Bambara. Costume de guerre.[9]. Femme Peul du village de Kouar-Basniamm; Peul du meme village. Costume de guerre.[10]. Femme Peul du village de Kouar; Peul du meme village. Costume de guerre.[11]. Mandingue du Wolli. Costume de guerre / Femme Foulah du Cantorah (Bords de la Gambie).

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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         Le Monde tel qu'il sera. Illustré par Bertall, O. Penguilly et St.-Germain.

      Paris: Edité par W. Coquebert, Impression de Schneider et Langrand, sd 1846 - Première édition, petit in-4; [iv], 324p.; 10 planches hors-texte protégées par des serpentes, nombreuses vignettes en-têtes, lettrines et vignettes dans le texte. Joli cartonnage romantique en percaline bleue de l'éditeur, orné sur le plat supérieur d'une plaque dorée représentant un personnage bizarre faisant la promotion des nouvelles technologies avec la date "An 3000", et au plat inférieur d'un conducteur chevauchant un curieux véhicule amphibie à vapeur; dos entièrement orné de motifs divers, tranches dorées. Quelques rousseurs sans gravité, planches hors texte uniformément brunies, mais un bon exemplaire au cartonnage frais. Roman "futuriste" qui nous projette dans l'an 3000. Une civilisation entièrement matérialiste, avec allaitement en chaîne des bébés à la vapeur, qui sont triés après sevrage selon leurs dispositions phrénologiques, pour une éducation appropriée à leur vocation. Un monde peu réjouissant, dominé par des machines et l'appât du gain, dépeint dans cet ouvrage peu courant de "proto science-fiction" dans un beau cartonnage frais. Bridenne, "La littérature française d'imagination scientifique", pp. 62-64. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LIBRAIRIE DES CARRÉS]
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         THE CHEROKEE PHYSICIAN OR INDIAN GUIDE TO HEALTH, AS GIVEN BY RICHARD FOREMAN, A CHEROKEE DOCTOR...

      Chattanooga, Tn.: Printed at the "Gazette Office,", 1846. [v]-xv,416pp. plus [2]pp. errata. Antique-style half calf and marbled boards, leather label. Light foxing and soiling. Scattered wear. A few pencil marks. Very good. The exceedingly rare first edition of this practical guide to medical remedies, the first book published in Chattanooga, as related by Cherokee doctor Richard Bark Foreman. Foreman, whose Cherokee name was Oo-ya-lu-gi, was born about 1779 to Scotsman John Anthony Foreman, an Indian trader (born probably in Scotland, whose family settled in Pennsylvania). Foreman's mother was a Cherokee of the Paint Clan, named Susie Gourd "Kah-tah-yah" (Rattling Gourd). The book is divided into three different sections: part one is on the human anatomy and general rules of illness prevention; part two contains descriptions of different diseases and their treatments; part three has a list of botanical remedies used by the Cherokee. Interestingly, in many instances, the Cherokee name is given for certain ailments or botanical remedies, i.e. "Influenza or Malignant Sore Throat (On-eh-tlah-tsu-ni-sik-wah-his-lee)." Not in the Siebert Collection or any of the standard biographies. Sabin recorded neither this first edition nor the second edition (printed in Asheville, N.C. in 1849); he only included the third edition, printed in New York in 1857. A truly rare work. ALLEN, SOME TENNESSEE RARITIES 44. AII, TENNESSEE IMPRINTS, 1841-1850, 204 (locates 5 copies). SABIN 43875 (3rd ed).

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana ]
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         Dansk Marine-Ordbog

      Copenhagen -52 1846 - 4to [31x24cm] 2 volumes in one. scattered foxing, mostly light, otherwise in good clean condition in a half cloth over marbled paper boards binding, rubbed to the spine and edges. a scarce mid-19th century Danish maritime dictionary. the first part comprises 67 plates, most part coloured, with descriptive text accompanying each plate. the second part comprises an explanatory dictionary of marine and shipbuilding terms. text in Danish [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: McLaren Books Ltd., ABA, PBFA, ILAB]
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         L’Olivuzza ricordo del soggiorno della Corte Imperiale Russa in Palermo nell’inverno 1845-1846

      er cura degli Editori G. Bastianello, (1846), In Palermo, - In 4° grande (36x27,5 cm); (10), 93, (11) pp. e 13 c. di tav. Legatura editoriale in cartoncino rigido con titolo impresso in nero al piatto anteriore entro cornice xilografica. Rinforzo al dorso in carta verde. Una piccola mancanza di carta all’angolo superiore della prima carta bianca, ininfluente, un leggero alone, probabilmente dovuto alla qualità della risma di carta utilizzata, al margine interno basso bianco della pagine centrali dell’opera. La tavola con gli interni del Castello della Zisa e quella della Grotta di Santa Rosalia si presentano leggermente brunite. A parte questi lievi segni del tempo esemplare in buone condizioni di conservazione ad ampi margini. Prima ed unica edizione di quest’opera non comune e ricercata, composta in occasione della visita della Corte Russa a Palermo nell’inverno del 1845. L’Olivuzza era una zona della città dell’agro palermitano che prendeva il nome dalla proprietaria, una certa Oliva, di una celeberrima Taverna, zona che poi era diventata, per la sua collocazione e l’ottimo clima, la sede di numerose ville della nobiltà palermitana fra le quali, una delle più deliziose era considerata la villa della principessa di Butera, Caterina Branciforti fatta erigere secondo i disegni dell’architetto francese Montier. Il secondo marito della Branciforti, divenuto vedovo aveva sposato, la dama russa Barbara Schahoskoy. "La Schahoskoy, durante un soggiorno a Pietroburgo, seppe – come riferisce Oreste Lo Valvo nel suo "L’ultimo ottocento palermitano" – che «per la malferma salute dell’imperatrice Alessandra, moglie dello zar Nicola I, si consigliava l’aria del mezzogiorno e quindi le faceva spontanea offerta della sua casa in Palermo »". Sembra che per la scelta della località avessero anche avuto notevole influenza anche il grande apprezzamento per il territorio palermitano ed in particolare la zona dell’Olivuzza che a più riprese avevano manifestato allo Zar i principi di Prussia, e specialmente Carlo, che visitò più volte Palermo, il principe Voronzov che dopo un soggiorno, partì vivamente colpito da questi luoghi e anche Ludovico di Baviera, che onorava la Sicilia e Palermo di una speciale predilezione. "L’invito fu accettato e il 23 ottobre del 1845 tutta la famiglia imperiale russa giunse a Palermo, festosamente accolta, al porto e lungo le vie cittadine, da una folla incontenibile". "Oltre che nella villa Butera all’Olivuzza, la corte russa aveva preso alloggio nelle attigue ville del duca di Serradifalco e del principe di Belmonte. Altri dignitari avevano trovato ospitalità presso il palazzo Trinacria, di proprietà del principe di Scordia, antistante la marina". L’opera celebra questo avvenimento che è rimasto nella storia della Sicilia, di Palermo ma anche in quella della Corte Russa che vide il ritorno in questi luoghi, nel corso degli anni successi, di vari suoi rappresentanti. L’opera è celebre anche per la presenza al suo interno della prima composizione del grande Vincenzo Bellini dal titolo "La Farfalleta" che qui viene per la prima volta pubblicata. L’opera raccoglie scritti e componimenti. Oltre che di Bellini Vincenzo, anche di Giuseppe Bastianello, Pietro Lanza, Agostino Gallo, Terenzio Mamiano della Rovere, Domenico Avella, Ugo-Carlo Papa, Giuseppe Solito, Giuseppina Turrisi Colonna, Pompeo Inzenga, Ugo-Carlo Papa, Giuseppe di Giovanni, Emanuele Raimondi, Clelia Manjoret,Francesco Paolo Priolo. Bellissimi i ritratti della famiglia imperiale. Non comune. Rif. Bibl.: IT\ICCU\MUS\0045006.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Antonio Zanfrognini]
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         Experimental researches in electricity (Nineteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-first Series): On the magnetization of light and the illumination of magnetic lines of force; WITH: On new magnetic actions, and on the magnetic condition of all matter; WITH: On new magnetic actions, and on the magnetic condition of all matter - continued

      London: Taylor, 1846. SCARCE FIRST EDITION OFFPRINT INSCRIBED BY FARADAY; FROM HIS CELEBRATED "EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES IN ELECTRICITY" SERIES DOCUMENTING ONE OF HIS MOST REVOLUTIONARY DISCOVERIES: "THE FARADAY EFFECT", "THE FIRST EVER DEMONSTRATED LINK BETWEEN LIGHT AND MAGNETISM". "In September 1845, using a special lead borate glass that he himself had prepared almost twenty years earlier, Faraday discovered the so-called Faraday effect, that is the rotation of the plane of polarization of light by a magnetic field. This was the first ever demonstrated link between light and magnetism. It marked the birth of magneto-optics which, through the agency of Faraday's notion of lines of force, was to be triumphantly extended by Clerk Maxwell ten years later."Faraday was imbued with belief in the underlying unity of the forces of nature; and it was this that prompted him to investigate the connection between light, magnetism and electricity. One of his experiments in 1845 was to observe whether plane-polarized light when passed through a transparent insulator was influenced by strong electric fields. He saw no evidence of any effect. Then he switched his attention to magnetism. A variety of transparent materials were placed across the poles of two powerful cylindrical electromagnets placed side by side... but all the results were negative. Then, with one of his own glass samples, the lead borate mentioned earlier, success came on 13 September 1845. The glasses he tried first gave, at best, only dubious results because they were so heavily strained and striated. It was when he remembered his optical glass samples that he found something good enough..."When on 5th November he dispatched his paper, entitled 'On the magnetization of Light and the Illumination of Magnetic Lines of Force' to the Royal Society, the opening paragraph had celestial resonance:I have long held an opinion, almost amounting to a conviction, in common I believe with many other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; or, in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, one into another, and possess equivalents of power in their action. In modern times the proofs of their convertibility have been accumulated to a very considerable extent, and a commencement made of the determination of their equivalent forces."Faraday proceeded to show that the effect first observed with the lead-containing glass, was also exhibited by many other materials, not just glass, if the conditions were right. The direction of the rotation of the plane ion polarization depends upon the direction of the magnetic field - this is the Faraday effect. And it has repercussions which, to this day, are of great practical value; the tracking of spacecraft is a recent one" (J.M. Thomas, Michael Faraday and the Real Institution).The first paper (Series 19) presents his startling results of the relationship between magnetism and the polarization of light; the second paper (Series 20) and its continuation (Series 21) explain his dramatic discovery on the universality of magnetism, noting that every material possesses an innate magnetic character to a greater or lesser degree. These papers were "the last, and in many ways the most brilliant, of Faraday's series of researches" (Dictionary of Scientific Biography).Provenance: Inscribed on the front wrapper "from the author" in Faraday's hand to Alexandre-Edmond Becquerel (1820-91). "Becquerel's most important achievements in science were in electricity, magnetism, and optics. In electricity he measured the properties of currents and investigated the conditions under which they arose. In 1843 he showed that Joule's law governing the production of heat in the passage of an electrical current applied to liquids as well as to solids. In 1844 he rectified Faraday's law of electrochemical decomposition to include several phenomena that had not been taken into account, and in 1855 he discovered that the mere displacement of a metallic conductor in a liquid was sufficient to produce a current of electricity" (DSB). In 1839, at age 19, Becquerel created the first photovoltaic cell, the technology behind modern solar panels.Offprint from: Philosophical Transactions, Vol. 136, Part I. London: R. & J. E. Taylor, 1846. Original printed wrappers rebacked; custom cloth folding case. A scarce inscribed offprint documenting one of Faraday's crowning achievements. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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         Storia dei monumenti del Reame delle Due Sicilie

      Stamperia del Fibreno, 1846. Tre volumi di cm. 24,5, pp. 694 (2); 718 (2); 487. Con 74 (su 75, manca ab origine una tavola nel primo volume) tavole incise su rame da Gigante, Pistolesi, Imperato, Aloja e Cattaneo che raffigurano i luoghi più suggestivi del Regno (vedute, piazze, monumenti, chiese, palazzi): Nisida, Miseno, Taranto, Minturno, Ercolano, Pompei, Pesto, Benevento, Montecassino, Arpino, Sessa, Gaeta, e ovviamente Napoli con Porta Capuana, Duomo, Palazzo Donn'Anna, Fontana Medina, Palazzo Gravina, Palazzo dei Ministeri, Arco di Trionfo, Albergo dei poveri, Palazzo Reale, Teatro S. Carlo, Chiesa di S. Francesco di Paola, Fontana di S. I.ucia, Palazzo dei Tribunali, Chiesa del Gesù nuovo, Campanile del Carmine, Villa Reale, ecc. Legatura coeva in piena pergamena rigida con titoli su doppio tassello e fregi in oro al dorso. Fioriture sparse, peraltro esemplare ben conservato. Il primo volume, curato da Pietro Micheletti, include la relazione e l'introduzione storica all'opera, con la descrizione dei più suggestivi luoghi del Regno con i relativi tesori artistici; il secondo e il terzo, curati rispettivamente da Scipione Volpicella e Vincenzo Corsi, descrivono i principali edifici della città di Napoli. Rara edizione originale, difficile da trovare completa del terzo volume. Cfr. Fera, Regno di Napoli e delle Due Sicilie, II, nr. 219: "Artistica opera ottocentesca di estrema rarità"; Iccu..

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Apuleio]
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         Der Repetitions-Theodolit, neu construirt. - Und: Der Dosensextant und zwei Nivellir-Instrumente, neu construirt.

      Kassel Krieger 1846 - (28 x 21,5 cm). (2) 50 (1) S. Mit 3 gefalteten gestochenen Tafeln. Rückenbroschur in moderner Leinwand-Kassette. (Magazin von den neuesten mathem. Instrumenten). Einzige Ausgabe. - Der Band enthält weiter von J. W. Gattermann: Der Transporteur und am Ende die Beschreibung von zwei Nivellier-Instrumenten für Eisenbahn-Ingenieure von Breithaupt. - Breithaupt (1780-1855) wurde 1814 zum kurfürstlich hessischen Hofmechanikus und Münzmeister ernannt. Für die Konstruktion einer Kreisteilmaschine erhielt er 1824 die goldene Medaille des Kurfürsten von Hessen. "Die sinnreichen Constructionen der von ihm gelieferten Instrumente, verbunden mit solidem und gefälligem Bau derselben, verbreiteten seinen Ruf, führten ihm zahlreiche Aufträge zu und erhoben seine Werkstätte zu einer der geachtetsten ihres Faches und ihrer Zeit, welchen Rang sie unter seinem Sohne und Nachfolger fortwährend behauptet. Die mathematisch-mechanische Litteratur verdankt ihm ein mit Recht sehr geschätztes Werk, das "Magazin der neuesten . mathematischen Instrumente", worin eigene und fremde (durch ihn ausgeführte) Constructionen beschrieben und erläutert sind" (ADB III, 291). - Stellenweise etwas stockfleckig, sonst wohlerhalten. - Poggendorff I, 288 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Gerhard Gruber]
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         Life in the Wilderness;

      1846 - or, Wanderings in South Africa. First edition. Frontispiece & 2 plates, with several illustrations in the text. 8vo. Later half morocco, some light staining to pastedowns, bookplate & embossed stamp on title page. xiii, 318pp. London, Richard Bentley, ?An early work of travel and sport, in this the author trekked to the Orange and Vaal rivers, eventually venturing into Griqualand during an eight-month sporting safari? (Czech.) Although its primary interest is for its description of game animals, the work provides a good deal of information on geography and botany. The author saw Makoma at Fort Beaufort - ?the celebrated chief and orator . in a brutal state of intoxication, surrounded by his wives and chancellors? (p46.) Methuen also met up with Livingstone, who was returning to Mobatze. Mendelssohn II, p6; Czech, p114. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
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         Gatherings from Spain ...[bound with]... California: Four Months Among the Gold-Finders [bound with]... What I Saw in California ...[bound with]... The Bird of Passage

      9 x 6 inches, Marbled boards over green leather spine with gilt titling, general wear, rear joint cracked, Four Volumes bound in One: Richard Ford 'Gatherings', 160 pages, [circa 1846], stain to upper right hand corner; Tyrwhitt [Vizetelly] 'California' and Edwin 'What I Saw in California', 136 pages, [1849, 1852], includes map, tear to page 101 affecting text; Isabella F. Romer 'The Bird of Passage', 207 pages, [circa 1849], stain to upper right-hand corner. All four works are in the same format and typeface. The two California books were issued together (with Vizetelly ending on the recto and the Bryant commencin on teh verso of the same leaf). This California volume cited Kurutz 653d [Paris, 1849].

      [Bookseller: Dawson's Book Shop ]
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         Album à l'usage des peintres ou choix de vingt genres de lettres pour spécimens d'enseignes.

      Poitiers: Gauvin, (1846). Oblong folio. (1), 20ff. Lithographed title page followed by twenty plates containing a variety of alphabets for commercial artists, designed by Poisson and lithographed by Gauvin. Poisson's collection of alphabets, several of which seem rather modern, was intended for sign- and billboard-makers and artists who created various promotional material. A scarce piece of provincial printing that is not noted in any of the standard references on the lettering arts; the dating here is derived from the sole recorded copy at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. Scattered light foxing, several creased page corners, otherwise a very good copy in likely original plain salmon wrappers, which show minor edgewear and soiling.

      [Bookseller: Bromer Booksellers]
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         The United Irishmen; Their Lifes and Times. By R.R. Madden, M.D., M.R.I.A. with Numerous Original Portraits.

      Third Series. Three Volumes. Dublin, Published by James Duffy, 1846. 19 x 11 cm. Vol.1: xi, 418 pages with frontispiece and three plates. / Vol.2: 350 pages with frontispiece and one plate. / Vol.3: vii, 318 pages with frontispiece and four plates. New half leather over marbled boards (Kenny's Bindery 2017). All edges marbled. Very good condition. New Bindings. Internally clean with little age darkening. Very mild foxing / browning to plates. A few small nicks and closed tears. Richard Robert Madden (1798 - 1886) was an Irish doctor, writer, abolitionist and historian of the United Irishmen. Madden took an active role in trying to impose anti-slavery rules in Jamaica on behalf of the British government. From the library of Edmund Downey, Waterford, but not signed or inscribed by him. Edmund Downey was a publisher (Downey & Co.) and former owner of the ‚Waterford News'. He died in 1937.

      [Bookseller: West Coast Rare Books]
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         Norges gamle love indtil 1387. Förste (til) Femte Bind (kpl.)

      Christiania, 1846 - 1895. 4to. XII, (2), 463 s. + X ,523 s. + XV, (2), 310 s. + XXVI, 797 s., XVII fargepl. + XIII, (3), 864 s., 6 fargepl. På gammelnorsk og latin. Norrøn tekst i fraktur. Orig. blått kartongbd. m. sjirtingrygg og papir tittelfelt. Ubeskåret, pene. Lite navnest.. . Verket utmerker seg med en usedvanlig vitenskapelig nøyaktighet med nøktern og etterrettelig gjengivelse og presentasjon av kilder.

      [Bookseller: Norlis Antikvariat]
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         Storia di Torino

      Alessandro Fontana, Torino 1846 - Due volumi in 8°, pp. X, 11-531; 773, (1 di errata, 4 di testo esplicativo dell'Atlante della Storia di Torino). Copia completa della grande tavola di Torino nel 1846, spesso assente, e delle due tavole litografiche riproducenti tre piante di Torino nel 1572, nel 1680 (queste due in un'unica tavola) e nel 1640. Leg. tela bruna dell'epoca con titoli oro sui dorsi (cerniere ben restaurate). Abituali fioriture. Edizione originale. Cfr. Lozzi II, 5389, note; Peyrot, II, 493. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Libreria antiquaria Atlantis (ALAI-ILAB)]
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         The Illuminated Bible, Containing The Old and New testaments Translated out Of The Original Tongues, and with The Former Translations Diligently Compared and Revised..

      New York: Harper & Brothers, 1846. Hardbound. VG-. Ex art library copy with markings on lower text block edges and base of decorative title page. Small area of dampstaining to the extreme lower margin of the last 15 sheets or so, in the index section, not bad. Newly restored with the following remedies to it's former condition: repair text block and sew as needed; spine re-backed and reinforced with cotton; new endbands inserted as original; boards tightened and cleaned; new leather spine inserted; original spine expertly relaid onto new spine. A superlative restoration.. Black leather elaborately and significantly embossed on covers, edges and spine, all edges gilt. "Embellished with sixteen hundred historical engravings by J.A. Adams, more than fourteen hundred of which are from original designs by J.G. Chapman." A monumental achievement in American Bible Production. Occasional scattered foxing, one page has a small tear at the bottom. Overall, an exceptional copy of a very rare Bible. The covers of this book depict an image of a gilt fountain or well, with three spouts draining water into the retention area of the fountain, which is supported by three smiling heads. All this is surrounded by elaborate and symmetrical gilt design. Spine has five raised bands and six gilt embossed and decorated compartments, with "HOLY BIBLE" being in the second compartment from the top.

      [Bookseller: Mullen Books, Inc. ABAA / ILAB]
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         Oeuvres choisies de Gavarni. Revues, corrigées et nouvellement classées par l'auteur. Etudes de moeurs contemporaines. With total of 319 full page plates

      First Edition, J. Hetzel 1846-1848, Paris, Bound in 2 very fine grreen contemporary half calf with raised bands and rich golddecoration and goldprint on spines. Only a small wear to bindongs and corners a little bumped. Les enfants terribles, Traduction en langue vulgaire, Les Lorettes, Les Actrices. La Vie de Jeune Homme, Les Débardeurs. Etudes de moeurs contemporaines. Le Carnaval a Paris. Paris le matin. Les etudiants de Paris. La vie de jeune homme. Les Debardeurs.

      [Bookseller: Andersens Antikvariat]
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         Daguerreotype Portrait of Baltus Stone

      He Fought with George Washington: Amazing Daguerreotype of a Revolutionary Soldier born in the 1740s. Hand-tinted quarter plate daguerreotype, blue paper mat, cased, contemporary manuscript laid over the case lining stating: "Baltus Stone, Revolutionary Pensioner of the United States. Born October 1744. Signed his receipt for his Pension at the Philadelphia agency by making his mark. March 5, 1846. Aged about 101 ½ Years." This remarkable portrait of Revolutionary War veteran Baltus Stone is one of the very few daguerreotypes of a person who had lived in colonial America. Few Americans born before 1750 had their likenesses captured by the new medium of photography, which came to America in 1839. The precise date of Stone's birth is uncertain. The inscription in this case gives it as 1744, while his obituary gives the year 1743. Stone's pension application of 1820 states that he was then sixty-six, suggesting a birth year of 1754. The Copes-Bissett family Bible, which records the family of Stone's presumed daughter Hannah, gives the year 1747. In any event, Baltus Stone is one of the very earliest-born people to be photographed. The earliest competitor we have seen cited is a John Adams born in Worcester in 1745. Maureen Taylor's The Last Muster: Images of The Revolutionary War Generation (2010) reproduces portraits of only two men born as early as that decade, in 1746 and circa 1749. Another candidate is the African-American slave Caesar, with an uncorroborated birth year of 1737, whose daguerreotype is in the collection of The New-York Historical Society. Stone died just months after sitting for this daguerreotype. His October 1846 obituary states: 'The venerable Baltis [sic] Stone, well known in Southward [presumably Southwark, South Philadelphia] as the oldest inhabitant, & a veteran of Revolutionary times, died on Thu. Last. At an early age the dec'd entered the army as a rifleman, along with his father, who sealed his devotion for his adopted country with his life's blood. Baltis Stone was with Washington in every campaign of the Revolutionary struggle, & witnessed the battles of Bunker Hill, Trenton, Germantown, Red Bank, & others, & yet escaped without receiving a wound. He has received a pension from Gov't, as a reward for these services, for many years. He was 103 years & 16 days old at his death. He was able to walk, supported by his staff, until within a few months past" (National Intelligencer, 27 October 1846). Stone's official pension file reveals the obituary's embellishments. According to that file, Stone enlisted as a private in the Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment. He saw action in the Battle of Long Island (August 1776). Captured by the British, he was freed in an exchange at the end of his enlistment period. By late 1777 Stone had reenlisted as a wagoner--possibly with Philadelphia's First Battalion, City Militia--and subsequently saw action at Brandywine (September 1777) and Germantown (October 1777). Stone first applied for a veteran's pension in June 1818, after the passage of the Act to Provide for Certain Persons Engaged in the Land and Naval Service of the United States in the Revolutionary War. Stone was apparently required to reapply for his $8 per month pension in 1820, as the file also contains a deposition from that year. Stone declared at that time, "I have no property of any description, am by occupation a day labourer, but from decrepitude and general infirmity am unable to labour. I have one daughter married with whom I reside and I am in such indigent circumstances as to be unable to support myself without the assistance of my country." This tremendous daguerreotype of an ancient Revolutionary War veteran virtually transports us to another era in the nation's history, before the United States of America even existed.

      [Bookseller: 19th Century Rare Book and Photograph Sh]
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         Annali Civili del Regno delle Due Sicilie - 1846

      Tipografia del Real Ministero degli Affari Interni nel Real Albergo de' Poveri - Napoli, NAPOLI 1846 - Annali Civili del Regno delle Due Sicilie ITALIANO Fascicolo della metà dell'800 in stato discreto, coperta in cartoncino con elegante cornice tipografica su piatti, marca tipografica su piatto anteriore, bruniture e macchie, bordo, cima, piede e punte consumati, tagli, con barbe, e margine di testa delle pagine appena bruniti, ultime pagine intonse, testo posto su due colonne. Mancanti le pagine: da 17 a 20, da 32 a 40, da 49 a 56. I tavola fuori formato, con le "Osservazioni Metereologiche fatte nel Real Osservatorio di Napoli a Capodimonte". Volume XL gennaio, febbraio, marzo e aprile 1846 del periodico Annali Civili del Regno delle Due Sicilie.

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
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         La mare au diable

      - Desessart, Paris 1846, 13x21cm, 2 volumes reliés en 1. - raro e molto ricercato Edition. Vincolante metà bordeaux dolore, spina piatto decorato grandi reti fredde, bordeaux piatti cartone guardie e contreplats di carta a mano, bordi spruzzato, vincolante contemporaneo. Copia gratuita di lentiggini (che è molto raro secondo Clouzot che cita sono spesso morsi). Bellissimo esemplare situato in un legame contemporaneo. - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Edition originale rare et très recherchée. Reliure en demi chagrin bordeaux, dos lisse orné de larges filets à froid, plats de cartonnage bordeaux, gardes et contreplats de papier à la cuve, tranches mouchetées, reliure de l'époque. Exemplaire exempt de rousseur (ce qui est très rare selon Clouzot qui mentionne qu'ils sont souvent piqués). Bel exemplaire établi dans une reliure de l'époque.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Feu Follet]
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         Le Comte de Monte-Cristo (2 Tomes - Complet)

      2 vol. in-4 reliure de l'époque demi-chagrin noir, dos à 4 nerfs, Au Bureau de l'Echo des Feuilletons, Paris, 1846, 2 ff., 478 pp. et 1 f. n. ch. (avis au relieur) ; 2 ff., 499 pp. avec 30 planches hors texte sous serpent gravée sur acier, sur chine monté (dont portrait de Dumas) Première édition illustrée d'un des plus célèbres romans de Dumas, et de tous les temps ! Un des exemplaires signalés par Carteret avec figures avant la lettre sur chine monté. Publiée un an après l'édition originale, il s'agit d'un ouvrage recherché, "aux portraits hors texte caractéristiques". Etat très satisfaisant (sans le feuillet bleu de placement des gravures du tome second, dos frotté, qq.rouss. mais bonne fraîcheur intérieure générale, les planches sont fraîches). Carteret, III, 210 ; Vicaire, III, 365-366 Français

      [Bookseller: Librairie Du Cardinal]
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         Experimental researches in electricity (Nineteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-first Series.) On the magnetization of light and the illumination of magnetic lines of force. On new magnetic actions, and on the magnetic condition of all matter. On new magnetic actions, and on the magnetic condition of all matter – continued.

      R. & J. E. Taylor, London 1846 - First edition, very rare inscribed presentation offprint, of these three papers containing two of Faraday?s major discoveries: the ?Faraday effect,? i.e., the effect of magnetism on the plane of polarisation of light (19th series; and ?diamagnetism? (20th and 21st series). These were ?the last, and in many ways the most brilliant, of Faraday?s series of researches? (DSB). In August 1845 William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) suggested to Faraday that electricity might affect polarized light. In fact, Faraday had been searching for this effect since the 1820s, but without success. Faraday realized, however, that the force of an electromagnet was far stronger and might therefore be able to produce a measurable effect. ?On 13 September 1845 his efforts finally bore fruit. The plane of polarization of a ray of plane-polarized light was rotated when the ray was passed through a glass rhomboid of high refractive index in a strong magnetic field. The angle of rotation was directly proportional to the strength of the magnetic force and, for Faraday, this indicated the direct effect of magnetism upon light. ?That which is magnetic in the forces of matter? he wrote ?has been affected, and in turn has affected that which is truly magnetic in the force of light? The fact that the magnetic force acted through the mediation of the glass suggested to Faraday that magnetic force could not be confined to iron, nickel, and cobalt but must be present in all matter. No body should be indifferent to a magnet, and this was confirmed by experiment. Not all bodies reacted in the same way to the magnetic force. Some, like iron, aligned themselves along the lines of magnetic force and were drawn into the more intense parts of the magnetic field. Others, like bismuth, set themselves across the lines of force and moved toward the less intense areas of magnetic force. The first group Faraday christened ?paramagnetic,? the second, ?diamagnetic?? (DSB). OCLC lists copies of this offprint at Burndy, Huntington and North Carolina State. No copies in auction records.Provenance: Alexandre-Edmond Becquerel (1820-91) (presentation inscription in Faraday?s hand on upper wrapper). ?Becquerel?s most important achievements in science were in electricity, magnetism, and optics. In electricity he measured the properties of currents and investigated the conditions under which they arose. In 1843 he showed that Joule?s law governing the production of heat in the passage of an electrical current applied to liquids as well as to solids. In 1844 he rectified Faraday?s law of electrochemical decomposition to include several phenomena that had not been taken into account, and in 1855 he discovered that the mere displacement of a metallic conductor in a liquid was sufficient to produce a current of electricity? (DSB). In 1839, at age 19, Becquerel created the first photovoltaic cell, the technology behind modern solar panels.?Throughout the spring and early summer of the same year [1845], with what little energy he had, Faraday continued his researches although there were many weeks when the Diary record is blank. Then, suddenly, on 30 August, there was the first entry on another attempt to discover the electrotonic state. This was to begin a period of feverish activity culminating in the discovery of the action of a magnetic field upon light and of diamagnetism ??The stimulus for the renewal of old lines of research was the young William Thomson, future Baron Kelvin of Largs. Thomson, only 21 years old in 1845, was one of the few scientists who took Faraday?s concept of the line of force seriously. Faraday had met him only a little time before and was greatly impressed with him. In 1845, Amadeo Avogadro sent Faraday a copy of an article on electrical theory which was far too mathematical for him. He turned it over to his young friend asking Thomson his opinion. On 6 August 1845, Thomson wrote Faraday a long letter in which he briefly summarized Avogadro?s paper and then went on

      [Bookseller: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS]
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         The Law of God, Containing the Book of Genesis, Edited and with Former Translations Diligently Compared and Revised, by Isaac Leeser

      Printed by C. Sherman for the editor, Philadelphia 1846 - First edition thus. Printed in Hebrew and English, with corresponding text on facing pages. 5 vols. 12mo. THE FIRST JEWISH TRANSLATION OF THE PENTATEUCH INTO ENGLISH. Isaac Leeser (1806-1868) was named hazan (cantor) of Congregation Mikveh Israel in Philadelphia in 1829. Leeser's "contributions to every area of Jewish culture and religion made him a major builder of American Judaism." The publication of his Pentateuch was the first time that any portion of the Bible was published in America under Jewish auspices. "The translation of the Bible was Leeser's great literary achievement and represented many years of patient labor and devotion to a task which he considered sacred ? He made good use of the various German translations by Jews of the collective commentary known as the Biur and of other Jewish exegetic works. As a result his translation though based in style upon the King James version can be considered an independent work for the changes he produced are numerous and great? until the new Jewish Publication Society version was issued in 1917, it was the only source from which many Jews not conversant with Hebrew derived their knowledge of the Bible in accordance with Jewish tradition" (Waxman, History of Jewish Literature, 1090). Goldman 7; Hills 1273; Rosenbach 569; Singerman 0884; Lance J. Sussman, "Another Look at Isaac Leeser and the First Jewish Translation of the Bible in the United States", Modern Judaism, Vol. 5, No. 2, Gershom Scholem Memorial I; Wolf and Whiteman, 373 Three quarter black morocco, tan cloth sides. Later gift inscription on half-title of vol. II, else internally clean. A fine set Printed in Hebrew and English, with corresponding text on facing pages. 5 vols. 12mo [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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         Experimental researches in electricity (Nineteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-first Series.) On the magnetization of light and the illumination of magnetic lines of force. On new magnetic actions, and on the magnetic condition of all matter. On new magnetic actions, and on the magnetic condition of all matter - continued.

      London: R. & J. E. Taylor, 1846. First edition, very rare inscribed presentation offprint, of these three papers containing two of Faraday's major discoveries: the 'Faraday effect,' i.e., the effect of magnetism on the plane of polarisation of light (19th series; and 'diamagnetism' (20th and 21st series). These were "the last, and in many ways the most brilliant, of Faraday's series of researches" (DSB). In August 1845 William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) suggested to Faraday that electricity might affect polarized light. In fact, Faraday had been searching for this effect since the 1820s, but without success. Faraday realized, however, that the force of an electromagnet was far stronger and might therefore be able to produce a measurable effect. "On 13 September 1845 his efforts finally bore fruit. The plane of polarization of a ray of plane-polarized light was rotated when the ray was passed through a glass rhomboid of high refractive index in a strong magnetic field. The angle of rotation was directly proportional to the strength of the magnetic force and, for Faraday, this indicated the direct effect of magnetism upon light. "That which is magnetic in the forces of matter" he wrote "has been affected, and in turn has affected that which is truly magnetic in the force of light" The fact that the magnetic force acted through the mediation of the glass suggested to Faraday that magnetic force could not be confined to iron, nickel, and cobalt but must be present in all matter. No body should be indifferent to a magnet, and this was confirmed by experiment. Not all bodies reacted in the same way to the magnetic force. Some, like iron, aligned themselves along the lines of magnetic force and were drawn into the more intense parts of the magnetic field. Others, like bismuth, set themselves across the lines of force and moved toward the less intense areas of magnetic force. The first group Faraday christened 'paramagnetic,' the second, 'diamagnetic'" (DSB). OCLC lists copies of this offprint at Burndy, Huntington and North Carolina State. No copies in auction records. Provenance: Alexandre-Edmond Becquerel (1820-91) (presentation inscription in Faraday's hand on upper wrapper). "Becquerel's most important achievements in science were in electricity, magnetism, and optics. In electricity he measured the properties of currents and investigated the conditions under which they arose. In 1843 he showed that Joule's law governing the production of heat in the passage of an electrical current applied to liquids as well as to solids. In 1844 he rectified Faraday's law of electrochemical decomposition to include several phenomena that had not been taken into account, and in 1855 he discovered that the mere displacement of a metallic conductor in a liquid was sufficient to produce a current of electricity" (DSB). In 1839, at age 19, Becquerel created the first photovoltaic cell, the technology behind modern solar panels. "Throughout the spring and early summer of the same year [1845], with what little energy he had, Faraday continued his researches although there were many weeks when the Diary record is blank. Then, suddenly, on 30 August, there was the first entry on another attempt to discover the electrotonic state. This was to begin a period of feverish activity culminating in the discovery of the action of a magnetic field upon light and of diamagnetism ... "The stimulus for the renewal of old lines of research was the young William Thomson, future Baron Kelvin of Largs. Thomson, only 21 years old in 1845, was one of the few scientists who took Faraday's concept of the line of force seriously. Faraday had met him only a little time before and was greatly impressed with him. In 1845, Amadeo Avogadro sent Faraday a copy of an article on electrical theory which was far too mathematical for him. He turned it over to his young friend asking Thomson his opinion. On 6 August 1845, Thomson wrote Faraday a long letter in which he briefly summarized Avogadro's paper and then went on to tell Faraday of his researches ... At the end of his letter, Thomson asked Faraday about experiments that Thomson thought ought to be performed, for his theory seemed to predict effects that had not yet been observed. 'I have long wished to know [Thomson wrote] whether any experiments have been made relative to the action of electrified bodies on the dielectrics themselves, in attracting them or repelling them, but I have never seen any described. Any attraction which may have been perceived to be exercised upon a nonconductor, such as sulphur, has always been ascribed to a slight degree of conducting power. A mathematical theory based on the analogy of dielectrics to soft iron would indicate attraction, quite independently of any induced charge (such, for instance, as would be found by breaking a dielectric and examining the parts separately). Another important question is whether the air in the neighbourhood of an electrified body, if acted upon by a force of attraction or repulsion, shows any signs of such forces by a change of density, which, however, appears to me highly improbable. A third question which, I think, has never been investigated, is relative to the action of a transparent dielectric on polarized light. Thus it is known that a very well defined action, analogous to that of a transparent crystal, is produced upon polarized light when transmitted through glass in any ordinary state of violent constraint. If the constraint, which may be elevated to be on the point of breaking the glass, be produced by electricity, it seems probable that a similar action might be observed.' "All three of Thomson's queries are worthy of attention. The first clearly implied that dielectrics (and later, by analogy, diamagnetics) should mutually affect one another when transmitting the electric force -- an effect in diamagnetics under magnetic influence that Faraday was to seek for in vain. The second, with magnetic substituted for electric force, was to lead Faraday to broad and general views of terrestrial magnetism and its variations. The third was, of course, the most important. It described an effect that Faraday had long sought for and was never to find. It was discovered by Dr. John Kerr in 1875. But, in August 1845, this passage seems to have stimulated Faraday to try once more to detect the strain that, for a quarter of a century, he was convinced must exist in bodies through which an electric current was passing. As he wrote to Thomson: 'I have made many experiments on the probable attraction of dielectrics. I did not expect any, nor did I find any, and yet I think that some particular effect (perhaps not attraction or repulsion) ought to come out when the dielectric is not all of the same inductive capacity, but consists of parts having different inductive capacity. 'I have also worked much on the state of the dielectric as regards polarized light, and you will find my negative results at paragraphs 951-955 of my Experimental Researches. I purpose resuming this subject hereafter. I also worked hard upon crystalline dielectrics to discover some molecular conditions in them (see par. 1688 etc. etc.) but could get no results except negative. Still I Firmly believe that the dielectric is in a peculiar state whilst induction is taking place across it' ... "There had to be an effect! Faraday's whole theory of electrolysis and induction was based upon the creation of an intermolecular strain in substances through which an electric current passed. Perhaps the fault lay with his approach. The 'tension' (i.e. voltage) created by a galvanic apparatus was small; would not the much higher 'tensions' produced by static electricity be more effective in throwing the particles of a dielectric into the electrotonic state? A piece of glass was placed between the terminals of an electrostatic machine and polarized light was passed through it in various directions. Once again no effect was detected ... The temptation to quit and to disavow the electrotonic state once again must have been strong. Yet, the hypothesis had served him so well, and Thomson's independent reasonings supported his own so closely that it almost seemed impossible that this state did not exist. Writing to his old friend, Sir John Herschel, he later declared, 'It was only the very strongest conviction that Light, Mag[netism] and Electricity must be connected that could have led me to resume the subject and persevere through much labour before I found the key.' "There was one final experimental path still to be explored. Perhaps even with electrostatic tension, the forces involved were too small to be easily detected. Even a highly charged electrical body could hold only a small weight suspended from it. Compare this to electromagnets which could hold masses of hundreds of pounds in their power. From the patterns shown by iron filings, it was obvious that the magnetic power was exerted in curved lines. In the case of electrostatic induction Faraday had argued that the fact that induction took place along curved lines implied that the transmission of force was from particle to particle. The intermolecular strain thus created was the electrotonic state. Surely the curves of the magnetic lines of force implied equally a 'magneto-tonic' state and, since the magnetic power could be multiplied almost at will by the use of electromagnets, this state might be detectable where the electrotonic state was not. "On 13 September 1845, Faraday began to work with electromagnets. Again his efforts were unavailing. The magnet had no effect on polarized light when passed through flint glass, rock crystal, or calcareous spar. There were, in the laboratory, pieces of the heavy glass that Faraday had made back in 1830 for the Royal Society. This glass had an extraordinarily high refractive index, indicating that it acted powerfully upon light. Given the correlation of forces in which Faraday believed so strongly, should this substance not, perhaps, also be acted upon magnetically in such a way as to affect the plane of polarized light of a ray passing through it. The experiment was easily performed and, finally, the expected result was observed ... "Faraday threw himself with all his energy into an intensive examination of the new effect. Once again he followed the same course as he had with other new effects. All possible combinations of factors were tried so that a simple law of action could be established. The magnetic poles were placed in every conceivable position relative to one another; simple current-carrying helices were substituted for iron-core electromagnets; all the common transparent laboratory substances were substituted for the heavy glass and the effect observed. The thickness of the heavy glass was increased by putting a number of polished pieces together. From these experiments, he was able to draw a number of general laws which he stated in the published paper which made up the Nineteenth Series of the Experimental Researches in Electricity ... "There were two puzzling things about the new mode of action of matter. Why, if a state of tension were created by a magnet, did not the state of tension interact with the magnet to create attractions or repulsions of the diamagnetic? And why, if the state were analogous to the electrotonic state, were gases unaffected? These were the questions which Faraday now set out to answer, firmly believing that there must be interaction between diamagnetics and magnets, and that gases could not be exempt from what must be a universal force of nature ... "It was not until 4 November that success was achieved. Again Faraday's persistence should be noted in the face of repeated failures. There had to be an interaction, for such an interaction was a necessary consequence of his theory. Failure, therefore, only meant that the experimental set-up was not appropriate to detect the effect, and not that the effect did not exist. 'The bar of heavy glass ... was suspended by cocoon silk in a glass jar on principle as before ... and placed between the poles of the last magnet ... When it was arranged and had come to rest, I found I could affect it by the Magnetic forces and give it position; thus touching dimagnetics [sic] by magnetic curves and observing a property quite independent of light, by which also we may probably trace these forces into opaque and other bodies, as the metals, etc. The nature of the affection was this. Let N and S represent the poles and G the bar of heavy glass ... Then on making N and S active by the Electric current, G traversed not so as to point between N and S but across them, and when the current was stopped the glass returned to its first position. Next arranged the glass when stationary, then put on power, and now it moved in the contrary direction to take up cross position as before; so that the end which before went to the left-hand now went to the right, that being the neutral or natural condition' ... "Faraday did not know it at the time but he was by no means the first person to observe this effect. Brugmans first observed the repulsion of bismuth by a magnet in 1778. Coulomb appears to have seen a needle of wood set itself across a magnetic field; Edmond Becquerel [the recipient of the present offprint] reported the effect on wood in 1827, the same year that le Baillif published a paper on the magnetic repulsion of bismuth and antimony. In 1828 Seebeck reported the same effect with other substances. Faraday's success was not, therefore, the result of exceptional experimental skill. That the discovery of the class of diamagnetics is always associated with Faraday's name is due to the fact that he knew what to do with the discovery whereas the others did not. Commenting on le Baillif's paper on the magnetic repulsion of bismuth and antimony, Faraday remarked, 'It is astonishing that such an experiment has remained so long without further results.' There was, however, nothing really astonishing about it. None of those who observed the effect before Faraday had any room for it in their theories of magnetic action. Magnets either attracted or repelled -- they did not set bodies on edge. If they did, it was an anomaly that had to be explained away, not explained. Faraday, however, had already recognized that the new diamagnetic force was a rather odd one. Therefore, although the setting of his glass across the lines of magnetic force was peculiar, it was completely consonant with the peculiarity of diamagnetic action in general. "Faraday, once more, followed his usual experimental procedure. Having found a new effect, he set out to see how general it was. Everything from glass to foolscap paper, from litharge to raw meat was suspended between the poles of his powerful electromagnet. In the Twentieth Series, he listed over fifty substances exhibiting diamagnetic properties ... "Diamagnetism, Faraday seemed to be saying, was not a rare and exotic thing but connected intimately with the very marrow of our being. It was magnetism which was the exception and diamagnetism that was the rule. Surely such a power, Faraday was convinced, could not help but play a major role in the overall economy of nature ... "The one area in which neither magnetism nor diamagnetism appeared to intrude was that of the gases. To Faraday, this was impossible. These were basic forces of matter and, even given the exceptional properties of gases which seemed to set them apart from other species of matter, they still must share in its fundamental properties. His work on the condensation of gases, and especially his study of the critical point, had convinced him that there was a basic continuity between the liquid and the gaseous state. If liquids exhibited magnetic and diamagnetic properties, then gases could not be indifferent to the power of the magnet. "In 1845 the action of gases in a magnetic field eluded Faraday. No matter how he tried, he could detect no reaction whatsoever. The gases always occupied the zero position between magnetic and diamagnetic bodies. When they were compressed or when they were rarefied, they still registered 0° when polarized light was passed through them ... There was a possible explanation of the failure of gases to respond to magnetic forces that Faraday suggested. Supposing all bodies really were magnetic as Coulomb had suggested. Since these bodies were immersed in an ocean of air, the difference in their reaction to a magnetic field might be caused by the magnetic properties of the air itself ... This explanation had the attraction of both accounting for the peculiar action of gases and emphasizing the basic unity of magnetic action. It was an explanation to which Faraday would return some seven years later only to reject it. In 1845 there were seeming insuperable obstacles to its adoption. The gases still preserved their uniqueness by not acting upon a polarized ray of light when in a magnetic field. Thus, the continuity assumed by the hypothesis was really illusory since the gases acted here neither like magnetics or diamagnetics, each of which class of substances did act upon a ray of polarized light. A more serious objection was that the rarefaction of gases had no effect whatsoever upon their magnetic action. Thus, by extrapolation, empty space would have magnetic properties and this strained credulity a bit too much. How, after all, could Nothing (which was what space was, by definition) have any properties? In 1845 Faraday recognized the difficulty and rejected the hypothesis he, himself, had introduced. 'Such a view [he admitted] also would make mere space magnetic, and precisely to the same degree as air and gases. Now though it may very well be, that space, air and gases, have the same general relation to magnetic force, it seems to me a great additional assumption to suppose that they are all absolutely magnetic, and in the midst of a series of bodies, rather than to suppose that they are in a normal or zero state. For the present, therefore, I incline to the former view, and consequently to the opinion that diamagnetics have a specific action antithetically distinct from ordinary magnetic action, and have thus presented us with a magnetic property new to our knowledge' (2440). "Perhaps the most revolutionary of Faraday's ideas was to be the assignment of magnetic properties to empty space. In the 1850s he would quietly and without fuss or bother introduce the idea that empty space could transmit magnetic forces and must, therefore, itself be in a state of strain. Upon this idea, modern field theory was to be built" (Pierce Williams, Michael Faraday, pp. 382-394). Offprint from: Philosophical Transactions, Vol. 136, Part I. 4to, pp. ?????. Original printed wrappers, contained in a cloth folding case.

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         A Nomenclature of Colours Applicable to the Arts and Natural Sciences to Manufactures and Other Purposes of General Utility.

      Edinburgh & London. William Blackwood & Sons. 1846. - 8vo, 20.3cm, Second Edition, Improved, [vi],72,[8](Dr. Hay's works & notice from the press), plus 40 colour plates each with 6 mounted triangles of color chips, original blind decorated cloth boards rebacked [square backed because of the thickness of the plates; as issued. Allowing the book to open flat), with new crimson leather label, some slight foxing towards the preliminaries, contemporary owner's ms. notes about colour opposite several plates, bookseller ticket on the front endpapers "Dawson Bros. 23 Great St. James Street Montreal", rare (ho1). ~ One of Hay's most important books. It is listed in the third edition of the Birren Catalogue (1988) with the comment: "This is an early and rare collection of numbered color samples." Wurmfeld, Color documents, no. 14 with the comment: "Influenced by Field's treatise on color and pigment and Buffon's analysis of color as being parallel to music scales, Hay expounds on these theories in A nomenclature of colours . . . where he develops a numerical system of color relationships." As in other of Hay's books, the plates are here made up of multi-colored triangles of papers pasted on engraved stiff card stock. There are 40 plates having a total of 240 mounted and identified chips. Hay was an important writer on color; an account of his career is given in the D.N.B. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: J. Patrick McGahern Books Inc. (ABAC)]
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         Gedichte.

      Heidelberg, Akademische Verlagshandlung von C. F. Winter, 1846 Kl.8°, 2 Bl., 346 S., Illustrierter goldgeprägter Originalleinwandband, Rundumgoldschnitt, Einige S. stockfleckig, Erste Auflage (W/G2 4). Versand D: 20,00 EUR Erstausgaben deutscher Literatur

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Peter Petrej]
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         Count of Monte-Cristo With Twenty Illustrations, Drawn on Wood by M. Valentin, and Executed by the Most Eminent English Engravers, Under the Superintendence of Mr. Charles Heath. In Two Volumes. Vol. I. [II.]

      London Chapman and Hall 1846 - The First English Edition in Original Cloth of The Count of Monte-Cristo DUMAS, Alexandre. The Count of Monte-Cristo. With twenty illustrations, drawn on wood by M. Valentin, and executed by the most eminent English engravers, under the superintendence of Mr. Charles Heath. In two volumes. Vol. I. [II.] London: Chapman and Hall, 1846. First edition in English in book form. Two octavo volumes (8 7/8 x 5 1/2 inches; 227 x 140 mm). iv, 464; iv, 464 pp. Complete. With twenty woodcut plates (including frontispieces) by M. Valentin (designed for the English edition). Original green cloth, covers decoratively blocked in blind, spines lettered and tooled in gilt in compartments. Original pale yellow coated endpapers. Minimal bumping to extremities. A few small spots on cloth. Spines very lightly sunned. Plates in volume I with some foxing, but text very clean and volume II also very clean. A couple signatures standing proud in volume II. Previous owner's small bookplate on front pastedown of each volume. Overall an excellent copy with the gilt extremely bright and without restoration or wear of this rare and much sought-after title. Housed together in a custom cloth slipcase. The Count of Monte-Cristo first appeared in English as an illustrated serial in the London Journal earlier this same year. "No translator’s name is given, yet it is interesting to note that almost every successive English edition has been based upon his work" (Reed). F.W. Reed, quoting Maurice Baring, calls The Count of Monte Cristo "The most popular book in the world." The novel first appeared serially in the Parisian newspaper Le Journal des debats, from 28 August 1844 to 15 January 1846, and in fact met with tremendous success from the very first. Reed, pp. 175-176. HBS 67920. $37,500 [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Heritage Book Shop, ABAA]
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         Sorrowful Lamentation & Confession of Martha Browning of the murder of Elizabeth Mundell, who is Ordered for Execution on Monday next. [with] Life, Trial, and Execution of Martha Browning, for the Murder of Elizabeth Mundell at Westminster.

      1846 - 2 Broadsides. Trial Broadside (485 x 370mm). Original sheet trimmed and laid down on recent archival paper, small areas of loss to the extremities, not interfering with the text, and a little piece missing effecting the text. Creased across the middle. With woodcut border and illustration. Small number '10' written in red pencil far right hand corner. Execution Broadside (490 x 365mm). Original sheet trimmed and laid down on recent archival paper, small areas of loss to the extremities and main text, with some loss to text, and illustrator. With woodcut border and illustration. London, Paul Printer. [added in contemporary hand J[anuar]y 5 The trial and execution Broadside of Martha Browning, who was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Mundell, Westminster, on 3rd December 1845. The trial took place on 15th December 1845, and Martha Browning was executed at the young age of 23 , on 5th January 1846. Martha Browning had been living in the same room as Elizabeth Mundell for only a few weeks, and murdered her for the possession of what she thought was a £5 note, it turned out, however, that the note was counterfeit. Martha Browning attempted to make the murder look like a suicide, and she was successful until the victim's daughter noticed that she was carrying the £5 note that had been in the possession of her mother. The Execution broadside records that there was a stampede after Martha Browning'sexecution, the 'mob' was rushing to view anotherexecution,that of Samuel Quennell. 'The throng became so violent that it was expected that there would be great mischief done and loss of life'. Copies held at Tisch Library, Massachusetts, (Paul Printer) the British Library, Davidson College library, US, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Library, US, (Sharp Printer). The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, 1674 - 1913, (15th December 1845)online. 19th Century Newspapers at the British Library, online.

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
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         The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth

      London: Edward Moxon 1846 - London: Edward Moxon, 1846. Very Good. New and revised edition in 7 volumes, 8vo (6½ x 4), engraved frontispiece portrait to Volume I. Finely bound in very attractive period full blue calf, spines in six compartments, gilt titled in the second, gilt numbered in the third and decorated in the rest, five raised bands. All edges marbled. Very good set with excellent decorative binding. Corners a bit bumped & very slight natural wear to edges & extremities.     Condition Report Externally Spine – very good condition – very handsome spines. Joints – good condition – solid. Corners – good condition – bumped and worn. Boards – good condition – gilt decorated edges. Page edges – good condition – marbled. See above and photos. Internally Hinges – good condition – solid. Paste downs – good condition – marbled. End papers – good condition – marbled. Title – good condition – some foxing. Pages – good condition – some foxing. Binding – good condition – solid and attractive. See photos Publisher: see above. Publication Date: 1846 Binding: Hardback [Attributes: Hard Cover]

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        Group of thirteen Autograph Letters Signed to various correspondents, 1846-1862 where dated. In generally good condition, some showing traces of former mounting.

      - From Manchester, London (various addresses), Midhurst, Dunford and France. Declining to be president of the Manchester and Salford Early Closing Association, whilst supporting its aims - to A. Megson, the Hon. Secretary, 11 April 1846; to Henry Hogan, asking to borrow 500 francs - from Hotel Wagram, 12 August 1846; to his friend S[alis] Schwabe, describing his holiday and his wife's recovered health - from Hotel de France, Pau, 20 September 1846; to J. Ellis MP, asking for a copy of Montgomery's poem ' in reference to our Colonies, where he draws the simile of a tree whose wide spreading Branches will tear up its roots', 14 January 1850; to C[harles] De la Pryme agreeing to subscribe to an edition of the poems of Richard Realf (1832-1878), and giving his personal views on the usefulness (or lack of it) or poetry, 12 March 1852; to Francis Draper of the Fitzroy Teetotal Association, thanking him for his support, 21 December 1852; to R. White, declining to re-enter the House of Commons ('I think Milner Gibson is the very best candidate for Finsbury. He has large property there . it is always an advantage with a constituency to be identified with it by property relations.), 19 November 1857; to C.E. Macqueen, telling his that he had written a letter meant for publication to Gladstone, and giving his views on the economy, 22 April 1862; to Charles Sturge agreeing to accompany him to view the statue of 'your honored brother' (perhaps the memorial to Joseph Sturge (1793-1859) by John Thomas unveiled in Birmingham on 4 June 1862), ('at Mr Paultons, 15 Cleveland Square, Hyde Park') undated; to Mrs (?Julie) Schwabe, agreeing to see her either in the House of Commons, Streatham or the Athenaeum, (Victoria Street, Westminster, undated); to W. Ingram asking him to call and see Cobden's brother 'who is suffering terribly' (rather soiled, Dunford, undated); to 'John' about a printing project, and to Mrs Strutt expressing the hope of seeing her. Together with the final page of a letter (with corrections, perhaps a draft) to a journal, numbered '4' in the upper right hand corner, signed at the foot, 1 page 4to, dated Midhurst, 12 November no year, contrasting the British and American systems of education.'. I will not be tempted to touch upon the arguments in your articles, based up on assumption of my incorrectness which I do not admit. Nay, I presume that, if the truth be spoken, whether with respect to Education or the government expenditure in America, it will be admitted on all hands to be advantagious to us to know it. . . but every argument which can be used to stimulate us to emulate transatlantic education is equally available, with a free-trading nation in favor of state economy.' To Charles De la Pryme, 12 March 1852: '. As a general rule, I do not think we promote the best interests of young people by encouraging them to cultivate, as a means of subsistence or advancement in life, a talent for versification. . the talent which is expended upon a volume of poems might often be more beneficially employed in less showy performances. .' To C.E. Macqueen, 22 April 1862: '. it seems to me that now for a year at least the chief attention of the public will be given to the amount of expenditure with a view to economy. This is always the case during seasons of commercial depression. . I think you overrate my influence in your kind remarks on the value of my endorsement of your objects. .' [Attributes: Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: John Wilson Manuscripts Ltd ABA ILAB]
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