viaLibri Requires Cookies CLICK HERE TO HIDE THIS NOTICE

Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1771


         Representacion hecha al Señor Felipe Quarto, á nombre de las Yglesias Metropolitanas, y Catedrales de las Yndias, sobre que sus Prelacias sean provistas en los Capitulares de éllas, y naturales de sus Provincias. Por El Doctor Don Luis de Betancourt, Y Figueroa, Chantre de la Santa Yglesia de San Franco del Quito, en las Provincias del Peru y Procurador Gral. de las Yndias. Año de 1637. [And:] [1771 Representation.] Representacion hecha al Rey Nro. Sr. por la Ciudad de México; que tráta el mismo punto que la antecedénte, con motivo de que cierto Ministro, ó Prelado de aquéllos Reynos, expuso en un Ynforme á S. M. que los Americanos són de espiritu sumiso, y rendido, y se hermanan bien con el abatimiento; por lo que conviene téngan delante en los empléos de primer orden á los Españoles Européos, que con espiritu noble deséan el bien de la Patria, y el sosiego de nuestro amado Monarca

      A fine contemporary manuscript version of the celebrated Mexican 1771 Representation included alongside Betancourt y Figueroa's work calling for religious posts in the Americas to go to creoles rather than peninsular Spaniards. The 1771 Representation according to the historian David Brading "constituted a remarkably frank plea for Mexican autonomy within the imperial framework of the absolutist monarchy" (Brading, Origins of Mexican Nationalism, 1985, p. 16). For this, it came to be known as one of the earliest calls for Mexican independence from Spain and was included in J. E. Hernández y Dávalos' Colección de Documentos para la Historia de la Guerra de Independencia de Mexico de 1808 a 1821, México, 1877-1882, vol. I, no. 195, pp. 427-55, with the title "Representacion que hizo la ciudad de México al rey D. Cárlos III en 1771 sobre que los criollos deben ser preferidos á los europeos en la distribucion de empleos y beneficios de estos reinos". Hernández y Dávalos was the first to publish the 1771 Representation and his is generally that referred to by historians. The version in this manuscript, however, is slightly different and contains some extra passages. In the 18th century, following the shock of defeat in the Seven Years' War, the Spanish government sought to exert greater control over its transatlantic empire in what Brading has called 'the virtual reconquest of the Indies' during the reign of Charles III (Brading, p. 14). In 1767, the Jesuits were expelled from Spanish territories and over four hundred Mexican born clerics, the nucleus of Mexico's intellectual élite, were banished from Mexico. In addition, Bourbon enlightened ministers such as José de Gálvez and Archbishop Lorenzana, were sent to Mexico to tighten Spain's grip on its empire, they introduced new taxes and crown monopolies, and employed a vast range of fiscal officials openly favouring peninsulars over creoles in this new regime. It was against this and, more specifically, against a criticism of creole capability sent by Lorenzana to Spain that the 1771 Representation was composed by Mexican officials. As the historian J. M. Pérez Collados points out, what was remarkable about it was not just that it called for creole equality but that it asked for creoles to be preferred over and to the exclusion of peninsulars (Los Discursos Políticos del México Originario: Contribución a los estudios sobre los procesos de independencia iberoamericanos, 1998, p. 40). The 1771 Representation was one of, if not, the most powerful protest against the Bourbon reforms that were being so vigorously imposed on Mexico during the years in which this manuscript was written and it was natural that it should be associated with works such as that by Betancourt y Figueroa's which, according to Burkholder, was even re-published in a Madrid periodical in 1789 (see Burkholder, p. 58). The tensions created by the Bourbon reforms would overflow in the nineteenth century into the fight for Mexican independence and thus Hernández y Dávalos' identification of this 1771 Representation as one of the earliest documents in the Mexican independence movement is understandable. It is also written alongside Betancourt's treatise - on the same paper, in the same hand - with the modified title, 'Representation made to the King by the City of Mexico which treats the same subject as the previous work', clearly indicating that the two works were being associated at the time when Mexico's Ayuntamiento sent their Representation to Carlos III in 1771. While acting as a representative for the cathedrals of the Indies in Madrid in 1634, Betancourt, a native of New Granada, published the Memorial i Informacion por las Iglesias Metropolitanas, i Catedrales de las Indias, sobre que sean proveidas sus prelacias en los naturales, i capitulares dellas, setting out the legal foundations for advancing to bishops and archbishops dignitaries and natives from within the diocese. Interest was sufficiently high in his work for it to be re-published in 1635 and 1637 (from which the version in this manuscript is probably taken though the manuscript has an additional dedication not in the published version). Betancourt and his protest were not ignored. In 1636, he was appointed Chantre of the cathedral of Quito and in 1642 he became the first creole inquisitor of Lima, eventually being offered the post of bishop of Popayán which he turned down. Furthermore, at least a third of the 126 new prelates appointed between 1635 and 1699 were creoles (see Burkholder, Spaniards in the Colonial Empire, 2013, p. 58). Provenance: This manuscript formed part of Edward King, Viscount Kingsborough's (1795-1837) collection. It was item number 642 in the Catalogue of the Rare and Valuable Library of the late Rt. Hon. Edward Lord Viscount Kingsborough... which will be sold by auction... by Charles Sharpe (Dublin: Webb and Chapman, 1842). It was later in the collections of Sir Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872) and Sir Robert Leicester Harmsworth (1870-1937). Harmsworth 4641; Phillips 11649.

      [Bookseller: HS Rare Books]
 1.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


         John Livingston

      1771 - 1790. The letters in the archive are from several members of the Livingston family including John Livingston, Peter Livingston, Robert G. Livingston Jr., Robert R. Livingston, William S. Livingston, John R. Livingston, B. Livingston and Robert C. Livingston. One particular letter was written on March 31, 1782 from Tho. Tillotson to J.R. Livingston Esqr. The letter is about peace and reads in full, "Dr. John, I have waited some time for an opportunity to write you by a private hand, as the postage would be more injury than any amusement from the letter would be furnished you; it is not the case with you, as opportunities are furnished you daily from so large a trading town; however I am obliged to break through the economical system to comply with the request of you Mama, who informs me that you write her word that she did not account for the money, Cockbush sent you, which happened to come immediately under my notice; as it settled in the order for fifty dollars, that she gave me on you, that, a piece of linnen & the paying for the sleigh, which you were to settle for -- the chancellor has been with us for some time, but leaves us in a few days -- I give you joy on the flattering prospects of a peace next campaign & the acquisition we have made in the House of Commons for rescinding the American War -- How is your little wife? is her complaint mended, or increased by the spring? Bring her up as soon as you can, for be assured that Climate is the most improper for her that she can possibly live in, particularly the Spring -- Make my best respects to her, and the family in general. I am yours Dr. Sir & C. Tho. Tillotson." A September 26, 1771 letter from Robert G. Livingston reads in part, "I expect in the course of a few weeks from this date a vast variety of European & East India Goods calculated for the approaching season . . . for it's not a large profit I seek but a safe connection." Also included is an arrest warrant for Jacobus Feller for Trespassing signed by B. Livingston. In part the warrant reads, "The people of the State of New York, to the sheriff of the City of New York, GREETING "We command you that you take Jacobus Feller. If he shall be found within your Bailiwick, and him safely keep, so that you have his body before the Mayor, Recorder and Aldermen of the City of New York at the next Court of Common Pleas called the Mayor's Court, to be held at the Court-house of the said City, in and for the said City, on Tuesday the twenty Seventh day of September next . . . "

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
 2.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Locus & Opossum with Young

      Paris 1771 - This exquisite hand-colored folio engraving is from Maria Sibylla Merian's Histoire generale des insectes de Surinam et de toute l'Europe. Troisieme edition revue, corrigee et considerablement augmentee par M. Buch'oz. a laquelle on a joint une troisiemee partie qui traite des plus belles fleurs. The work was published in Paris by Chez L.C. Desnos in 1771. The engravings were done by J. Mulder, P. Sluyter and A. Stopendaal, all after Merian. The work is considered to be one of the most beautiful if not most famous illustrated natural history works of the 18th century.The work was the result of Merian's trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The pair studied and recorded plants and insects for two year under difficult conditions. They came back to Amsterdam with specimens and their work and produced this astounding work. It is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced . [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). --- The work is in excellent condition overall. There may be a few minor imperfections to be expected with age. Please review the image carefully for condition and contact us with any questions. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books]
 3.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         John Hancock

      , March 18 1771. March 18 1771. An interesting letter from Bristol merchant Henry Cruger to John Hancock concerning the possibility of a joint commercial venture. Hancock docketed it on the verso: "Henry Cruger Esq. from Bristol Rec'd May 9th 1771 By Capt Gough". Cruger's letter states: "... being a merchant, I have for some time past been desirous to have a connection with you in that character. At any Rate, I was ambitious of a Correspondence with you ... upon the encouragement given me by a number of gentlemen to put up one of my ships to take in good upon a General Freight for Boston - I determined to address her to you... Mr. Palfrey inform'd me of your inclination to establish a Ship on the Trade betwixt Boston & Bristol - and paid me the compliment to say I was the first & only person in the place that he would wish to see you connected with... very willing to hold a concern with you in a Vessel on this trade - either 1/4 or a 1/3d as was most agreable [sic] to your good self - but at the same time I think the more owners you have of your side of the water, the better on account of their orders for goods to promote her Freight. I am largely in the New York Trade - have the consignments of many vessels yearly... I submit the matter wholy [sic] to your discretion - I think if you were to build a good little ship of 150 to 160 tons, & have two or three owners of your side the water - I mean large importers of dry Goods - there is no doubt but the concern would get money by it. Engage your Friends who do business to this place to give your vessel the preference & my interest here can always command what freight is going... there are but few [articles sent] from your country to this... sixty or eighty tons of oil by a vessel goes off very well and so will 15 or 20 tons of pot ash. Dye wools of all sorts will sell in any quantity... lumber we abound in... NB spermacati oil is always L3 or L4 a ton lower in summer than winter... inclosed [sic] I beg leave to trouble you with three bills of Lading... I would not trouble you in this matter but as it may tend to promote the freight of a vessel of your own should you one day or other have one in trade... I have taken the liberty to trouble you with the consignment... should be glad to have my ship returned to Bristol directly if you can procure a Freight... [we] are quite overstocked with that kind of American lumber & it is become exceedingly cheap and very difficult to dispose of... Hen: Cruger Jr." British trade with the colonies was usually carried on in American-built ships. When ships themselves were the commodity, they were generally built in New England, loaded at a southern port, and then sent to their final destination in England. The two biggest colonial ports before the Revolution were Boston and Philadelphia; each controlled an extended peripheral region. New York controlled the business in that area, including western Connecticut and east New Jersey; Newport controlled Rhode Island; Charleston controlled South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia. Commerce involved barter, specie transactions, and bills of exchange; credit, however, was the most used form of exchange. The commercial relations of the colonies were greatly restricted by English laws; the colonists often circumvented these laws and carried on business to their best advantage. When England finally decided to enforce the restrictions, the colonists quickly grew angry and resented their loss of autonomy. The letter is in very good condition, with a few holes and tears. The ink, however, is quite dark and the content legible.

      [Bookseller: University Archives ]
 4.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         Nachrichten von den Lappen in Finmarken, ihrer Sprache, Sitten, Gebräuche, und ehemaligen heidnischen Religion. Mit Anmerkungen von J. E. Gunner. Aus dem Dänischen übersetzt.

      Leipzig, Dykische Buchhandlung 1771. - 8°, 11 Bl., 263 S., Halbleder der Zeit mit vergoldetem Rückentitel, Einband stärker berieben, innen sauber und gut erhalten, I. Bruun III, 847; Chavanne 3311. - Erste deutsche Ausgabe, selten. Der Autor war zunächst Missionar in Lappland, später Professor fur lappische Sprache. - II. Cat. Russica B 847; Recke-N. I, 135. - Erste Ausgabe. Angebunden: BERGMANN, Gustav. Geschichte von Livland, nach Bossuetischer Art entworfen. Leipzig, Schwickert, 1776. 4 Blatt, 176 S., 6 ganzseitige Kupfertafeln, zahlr. gestochene Vignetten, [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Werner Steinbeiß]
 5.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Il Mercurio errante delle grandezze di Roma, tanto antiche, che moderne : in questa nona edizione migliorato, et accresciuto, con l'aggiunta delle fabriche fattevi sin'al presente diviso in due parti : la prima contiene palazzi, e chiese, la Seconda.

      Lorenzo Capponi, Roma 1771 - Contemporary leather, leather black label on backstrip chipped, split in front paste-down, front cover clean, corners bumped. Rear cover split to top but still intact. in 2 parts: 432pp (incl. index). With 18 engraved folded plates. 2 plates by Piranesi (Veduta Di Belvedere in Vaticano & Palazzo Pontifico). Complete. Additional content Museo Capitolino Osia Descrizione Delle Statue, Iscrizioni, 135pp. Size: 12mo [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Henry Pordes Books Ltd]
 6.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Idée Générale d'une Collection Complette d'Estampes. Avec une dissertation sur l'origine de la Gravure et sur les premiers livres d'Images.

      A Leipsic et Vienne, chez Jean Paul Kraus, 1771. - in-8. 8ff. 520pp. 16ff. 32 planches hors-texte dont 16 dépliantes. Demi-maroquin à coins (reliure postérieure). Edition Originale de l'un des principaux ouvrages de Karl Heinrich von Heinecken (1706-1791). Diplomate et protecteur avisé des arts, il fut aussi le conservateur du cabinet des estampes de Dresde et forma "une des plus belles collections d'estampes d'Allemagne" (Larousse). "Le Cabinet des estampes de Dresde a été la principale source où le baron de Heinecken a puisé les renseignements curieux que renferme cet excellent ouvrage, devenu assez rare. Ces renseignements, ou plutôt ces descriptions, sont généralement fort exactes, mais les fac-simile qui les accompagnent le sont moins. Toutefois, l'Idée générale reste toujours un livre indispensable, malgré les progrès qu'a faits la connaissance des estampes depuis sa publication" (Brunet). L'ouvrage contient également d'importants renseignements sur les premiers livres illustrés. L'illustration se compose de 32 superbes planches gravées sur bois (dont 16 dépliantes) reproduisant diverses estampes, pour la plupart du 15e et 16e siècles. Exemplaire ayant appartenu au médecin bibliophile toulousain Tibulle Desbarreaux-Bernard (1798-1880) avec son étiquette imprimée dorée. Notre exemplaire présente également une inscription manuscrite ancienne à la page de titre "Adam V. Bartsch 1717-1818" et le tampon d'un monogramme sur un feuillet de garde. Brunet, Manuel du libraire, III, p. 82.

      [Bookseller: Librería Comellas]
 7.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Caiman Holding Snake

      Paris 1771 - This exquisite hand-colored folio engraving is from Maria Sibylla Merian's Histoire generale des insectes de Surinam et de toute l'Europe. Troisieme edition revue, corrigee et considerablement augmentee par M. Buch'oz. a laquelle on a joint une troisiemee partie qui traite des plus belles fleurs. The work was published in Paris by Chez L.C. Desnos in 1771. The engravings were done by J. Mulder, P. Sluyter and A. Stopendaal, all after Merian. The work is considered to be one of the most beautiful if not most famous illustrated natural history works of the 18th century.The work was the result of Merian's trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The pair studied and recorded plants and insects for two year under difficult conditions. They came back to Amsterdam with specimens and their work and produced this astounding work. It is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced . [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). --- The work is in excellent condition overall. There may be a few minor imperfections to be expected with age. Please review the image carefully for condition and contact us with any questions. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books]
 8.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         John Hancock

      March 18 1771. An interesting letter from Bristol merchant Henry Cruger to John Hancock concerning the possibility of a joint commercial venture. Hancock docketed it on the verso: "Henry Cruger Esq. from Bristol Rec'd May 9th 1771 By Capt Gough". Cruger's letter states: "... being a merchant, I have for some time past been desirous to have a connection with you in that character. At any Rate, I was ambitious of a Correspondence with you ... upon the encouragement given me by a number of gentlemen to put up one of my ships to take in good upon a General Freight for Boston - I determined to address her to you... Mr. Palfrey inform'd me of your inclination to establish a Ship on the Trade betwixt Boston & Bristol - and paid me the compliment to say I was the first & only person in the place that he would wish to see you connected with... very willing to hold a concern with you in a Vessel on this trade - either 1/4 or a 1/3d as was most agreable [sic] to your good self - but at the same time I think the more owners you have of your side of the water, the better on account of their orders for goods to promote her Freight. I am largely in the New York Trade - have the consignments of many vessels yearly... I submit the matter wholy [sic] to your discretion - I think if you were to build a good little ship of 150 to 160 tons, & have two or three owners of your side the water - I mean large importers of dry Goods - there is no doubt but the concern would get money by it. Engage your Friends who do business to this place to give your vessel the preference & my interest here can always command what freight is going... there are but few [articles sent] from your country to this... sixty or eighty tons of oil by a vessel goes off very well and so will 15 or 20 tons of pot ash. Dye wools of all sorts will sell in any quantity... lumber we abound in... NB spermacati oil is always L3 or L4 a ton lower in summer than winter... inclosed [sic] I beg leave to trouble you with three bills of Lading... I would not trouble you in this matter but as it may tend to promote the freight of a vessel of your own should you one day or other have one in trade... I have taken the liberty to trouble you with the consignment... should be glad to have my ship returned to Bristol directly if you can procure a Freight... [we] are quite overstocked with that kind of American lumber & it is become exceedingly cheap and very difficult to dispose of... Hen: Cruger Jr." British trade with the colonies was usually carried on in American-built ships. When ships themselves were the commodity, they were generally built in New England, loaded at a southern port, and then sent to their final destination in England. The two biggest colonial ports before the Revolution were Boston and Philadelphia; each controlled an extended peripheral region. New York controlled the business in that area, including western Connecticut and east New Jersey; Newport controlled Rhode Island; Charleston controlled South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia. Commerce involved barter, specie transactions, and bills of exchange; credit, however, was the most used form of exchange. The commercial relations of the colonies were greatly restricted by English laws; the colonists often circumvented these laws and carried on business to their best advantage. When England finally decided to enforce the restrictions, the colonists quickly grew angry and resented their loss of autonomy. The letter is in very good condition, with a few holes and tears. The ink, however, is quite dark and the content legible.

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
 9.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         History of the Bucaniers in America

      1771 - containing, I. The Exploits of Le Grand, Lolonois, Roche Brasiliano, Bat the Portuguese, Sir H. Morgan, &c. II. The dangerous Voyage and bold Attempts of Capt. Sharp, Watlin, Sawkins, Coxon, and others in the South Sea. III. A Journal of a Voyage into the South Sea by the Free-booters of America, from 1684 to 1689. IV. A Relation of a Voyage of the Sieur De Montauban, Captain of the Free-booters, in Guinea, in the Year 1695. Fifth English edition. 2 volumes. 12mo. Contemporary calf, newly rebacked. [iv], 318; [ii], 360, [12]indexpp. London, T. Evans & W. Otridge, Sabin 23489. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
 10.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Asmodaeus, Der hinckende Ehe-Teufel. Ein Sing-Spiel von dreyen Handlungen; nebst einem Zwischen-Spiel: Die verstellten und wahrsagenden Zigeuner. Die Musik zu diesem Singspiele sowol, als zum Ballet ist allhier ganz neu Componirt von Herrn Anton Götzlicher.

      Cölln, im Monath September 1771. - Mit Holzschnitt-Vignette auf Titel. 41 S. Rückenbroschur. Nicht bei Fromm und Hayn-Got.; über KVK nur die deutsche Erstausgabe von 1730 nachweisbar, diese völlige Umarbeitung des erotischen Klassikers "Diable boiteux" zum Singspiel und Ballett ist für mich nicht nachweisbar. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Uwe Turszynski]
 11.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         [Murner the Ghost Kitty - a Gothic Tale]. Aelurias epos iocosum

      Braunschweig: Impensis Orphanotrophei ("Orphanage Press"), 1771. First edition in Latin. Very good. 8vo. xii, 64pp. Contemporary German polished calf, pale pink and yellow marbled endpapers, five raised bands on spine, compartments gilt, marbled edges, label removed from inside front cover. A very pretty copy of an extraordinary work. Herein the consequences of failing to properly inter the corpse of a cat (named "Murner" in the German) are described as in mock heroic verse. Disguised as a Gothic tale, the work evidences real problems of the disposal of animal remains in the mid to late 18th-century; moreover, it illustrates the degree to which domesticated animals were seen as worthy of proper burial. The work is of further interest on account of the unique and marvelous engraved illustrations, which are worthy of exhibition and study. "Murner in Hell" is a highly curious poem in heroic hexameter which relates the story of Murner the Ghost Kitty, who having been killed whilst attacking a caged canary haunts his owners for failing to properly inter his body. "Murner in Hell" has nothing to do with Thomas Murner (1475-ca. 1537) but is a travesty on Book XI of the Odyssey, in which Elpenor pleads for Odysseus to bury his body. In the present Gothic Tale, Murner the cat haunts the whole house until his corpse is buried. The fine engraved frontispiece shows the scene of the crime: the canary's cage is knocked onto the floor; the Ghost-Kitty is crushed by the weight of the Baron, who lies on top of the cage (and the poor cat); the Baron's detestable accomplice runs shrieking into the room, ecstatic that the "wretched" cat was dead. The Latin translation was prepared by Benedictus Christianus Avenarius, who also translated the "Fabulae Aliquot" of various authors (pp. 55-64). Several editions in four languages appeared in the late 18th-century. An English translation, now virtually unobtainable, was issued in 1781 under the title "Tabby in Elysium" (translated by R.E. Raspe -- see NCBE II, col. 171 = ESTC T49795). The first lines of Canto I read: "Sing, smiling Muse! Sing the great heroic deeds and the miserable death of an immortal Cat; he passed the black banks of Cocytus; and his bones, as those of other heroes, were entombed in marble." The last copy to appear at auction was sold at Sotheby's London in 1978. Included in the present offering is the text of the English translation. ADB XLIV, 634-641. See Goedeke IV:2, 71, 5; 8; 9.

      [Bookseller: Michael Laird Rare Books LLC]
 12.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         A Summary View of the Laws Relating to Subscriptions, &c, With..

      , 1771. 1771. Adherence to the Creed of the Church of England [Randolph, Thomas (1701-1783), Attributed]. A Summary View of the Laws Relating to Subscriptions, &c. With Remarks, Humbly Offered to the Consideration of the British Parliament. London: [S.n.], Printed in the Year 1771. 36 pp. Octavo (7-3/4" x 4-3/4"). Stab-stitched pamphlet bound into recent period-style three-quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt fillets to spine, endpapers renewed. Negligible light rubbing to spine ends and corners, light toning to text. $500. * First edition, one of two issues from 1771 (the other an 8 pp. quarto). Subscription refers to one's adherence to the 39 Articles of Religion, the statement of the doctrines and practices of the Church of England that are part of the Book of Common Prayer. Degree candidates at Cambridge and Oxford were required to submit to a formal declaration of subscription. Using a legal argument, a Summary View opposes a recent movement to abolish this requirement. (Proponents of abolition, basing their case on William and Mary's 1701 Act of Toleration, presented a petition to Parliament in 1772 that was defeated.) Randolph, the presumed author, was a theologian and the president of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. A second edition of this pamphlet was published in 1772. English Short-Title Catalogue T57412.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ]
 13.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         Quakers

      [1771 - 1773]. Rare Broadside headed, “Extract from the Epistle of the Meeting for Sufferings in London, dated the Sixth Day of the Seventh Month, 1751,” 16” x 20.25”. “Philadelphia: Printed by Joseph Crukshank, in Third-street, opposite the Work-House.” Crukshank printed at this address from 1771-1773. The entire broadside has been silked on verso for preservation, strengthening the previously torn and missing portions at the separated folds which affected some of the text. On verso are 18 unsigned lines with medical content, including illnesses and possible remedies, penned by a patient (“...I was taken with the Dropsey in the 10th Mo. 1783 and in November following I was so much swelled as to be almost incapable of helping myself – my Doctor had tried every thing without Success, except tapping which I refused...”). Very Good condition. Joseph Crukshank was a member of the Society of Friends, and printed books, pamphlets, and broadsides for them as well as for his own sales. He opened a printing house in Philadelphia in 1769. This broadside is subheaded, “To the Quarterly and Monthly Meetings of Friends in Great-Britain, Ireland and America.” A similar extract was reprinted in 1791 by Isaac Collins, also a Quaker, and briefly Crukshank’s partner in a stationery and bookstore, Crukshank & Collins. Beginning, “Dear Friends, We think it may be useful and expedient to revive in your remembrance some of the Motives which induced our Ancient Friends to forbear the vulgar Appellations of the Months and Days, and to observe in their Conversations and Writings of such Names as were agreeable to Scripture, and the Practice of good Men therein recorded...our Ancient Friends were conscientiously concerned to refrain from the Use of those Names of Months and Days which had been ascribed by way of Honour to the Idols of the Heathen, and in Conformity to their false Worships...” Listed is “A Brief Account of the Origin of the Names of some Months of the Year, and of all the days of the Week, now customarily and commonly used.” After listing only the first eight months, explaining that the last four months “still retain their numerical Latin Names,” it is pointed out that “As the Idolatrous Romans thus gave Names to several of the Months in Honour of their pretended Deities: So the like Idolatry prevailing among our Saxon Ancestors, induced them to call the Days of the Week by the Name of the Idol which on that Day they peculiarly worshipped.” The origin of the names of the days of the week are explained as worshipping the Sun, the Moon, the idols Tuisco, Woden, and Thor, an “imaginary Goddess” called Friga, and Saturn. Since the medical-content writing on verso refers to the “10th Mo. 1783,” it was probably penned by a Quaker, even though November and January are also mentioned.

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
 14.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Histoire générale des insectes de Surinam et de toute l'Europe, contentant leurs descriptions, leurs figures, leures differentes metamorphoses . Par Mademoiselle Marie Sybille De Merian, En Deux Parties In-Folio, Troisieme Edition, revue, corrigée, & considérablement augumentée par M. Buch’oz, médecine botaniste de seur Sa Majesté le Roi de Pologne, membre de plusieurs academiés . ouverage interessant pour les amateurs de l’historie naturelle, et unique en son genre. Paris, Chez L.C. Desnos, 1771.

      L.C. Desnos, Paris 1771 - Groß-Folio (510 x 330 mm) 3 Bände in einem Band, neugebunden in rotem Maroquineinband im Stil der Zeit auf 7 Bünden. Rücken, Deckel und Innenkanten dekorativ ornamental blindgeprägt und vergoldet. Komplett mit 325 handkolorierten Kupferstichen auf 188 Blatt sowie Text. Es handelt sich um die dritte Ausgabe der zwei berühmten Werke von Maria Sybilla Merian und die vierte unbestätigte Ausgabe von Daniel Rabels ,Theatrum Florae’ erschienen bei dem Pariser Verleger Desnos 1771. Die Texte überprüft, korrigiert und erheblich erweitert von M. Buchoz. Handkoloriertes gestochenes allegorisches Titelblatt ,Recueil De Plantes de Surinam Par M.S. Merian .’; gedruckter Titel ,Tome Premier. Des Plantes de Surinam.’, 3 Bl., 72 gestochene Kupfertafeln, 72 S.; gedruckter Titel ,Tome Second. Les Plantes de L’Europe.’, 1 Bl., 184 Kupferstiche auf 47 Bl., 71 S.; gedruckter Titel ,Tome Troiseme: Des Plantes Bulbeuses, Liliacées, Carophyllées.’, 69 gestochene Kupfertafeln, 69 S. A very well preserved book, printed on good paper, partially also light-green or light-blue paper was used for printing the engravings. The hand colour is consistently very beautiful and carefully executed. The plates in older and in later hand colours. Plate 2 of the Surinam Insects with an old mended tear in the upper blank white margin. All plates consistently clean and well preserved. Occasionally smaller stains or smallrustspots from the printing process are are visible in the paper. A few text pages with mild browning and smaller stains, too. Bound in modern red maroquin, spine in seven compartments and morocco lettering on spine. The covers, spine and inner edges ornamental blindpressed and richly decorative gilt. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Reinhold Berg eK]
 15.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         Predigt bey der Taufe zweyer Israeliten, samt einem kurzen Vorbericht (und) Form und Glaubensfrage bey der Taufe zweyer Juden zu Zürich den 12ten Merz 1771. 2 in 1 Band.

      Zürich, Bürgkli 1771 - (19:11,5 cm). 80 S., (1) Bl.; 24 S. Marmor. Broschur der Zeit, gering berieben. - Weigelt 281.1 und 153.1. – Sehr seltenes Schweizer Judaicum; das zweite hier beigebundene Werk (ohne Impressum) noch seltener. – „Zween Israelitische Jünglinge / / wurden durch die vielen Ungereimtheiten des jüdischen Talmuds / /, durch Umgang mit einigen Christen und Proselyten, durch Lesung einiger Schriften, durch einige Blicke, die sie ins Neue Testament thun konnten, und auf einige andere Veranlassungen hin, unter dem erleuchtenden Einfluß der göttlichen Gnade, auf den Wunsch geleitet, die christliche Religion an einem Orte, wo sie völlige Freiheiten und von keinen Nachstellungen nichts zu besorgen hätten, mit Muße zu untersuchen. Sie entschlossen sich also, Berlin, wo sie beyde, der eine die Medicin, der andere den Talmud, studieren sollten, zu verlassen, und auf Zürich zu reisen“. (Aus dem Vorbericht). – Die Taufe der beiden Berliner Juden in Zürich, die dieser Schrift zugrunde liegt, sowie der Übertritt zweier (übel beleumdeter) Göttinger Juden zum Christentum, der auch in anderen Drucken gefeiert wurde, benutze Lavater propagandistisch in seiner, von vielen Zeitgenossen als peinlich und unangemessen empfundenen Auseinandersetzung mit Moses Mendelssohn, dem er seine Übersetzung: „Herrn Carl Bonnets Philosophische Untersuchung der Beweise für das Christenthum samt desselben Ideen von der künftigen Glückseligkeit des Menschen aus dem Französischen übersetzt und mit Anmerkungen hrsg. von Johann Caspar Lavater“ widmete, und ihn aufforderte, diese Schrift entweder zu widerlegen oder zum Christentum überzutreten. Die dadurch ausgelöste jahrelange Debatte zog weite Kreise und zermürbte Mendelssohn. Vgl. Hartung, Juden und Deutsche Literatur, S. 16 ff. Eine der Reaktionen in dieser Auseinandersetzung - und ganz konkret auf die „Predigt bey der Taufe zweyer Israeliten“ - war Lichtenbergs ironischer: „Timorus, das ist Vertheidigung zweyer Israeliten, die durch die Kräftigkeit der Lavaterischen Beweisgründe und der Göttingischen Mettwürste bewogen den wahren Glauben angenommen haben“. Berlin 1773. Vgl. dazu Lazarowicz, Verkehrte Welt. Vorstudien zu einer Geschichte der Deutschen Satire. Tübingen 1963, S. 191 ff. Exlibris, sauberes Exemplar. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: A la Recherche]
 16.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         The Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Chronicle. Volume XLI (41) January to December 1771

      D Henry; F Newbery, London 1771 - iii, 532pp + plates. 24 b/w plates and maps (13 fold-out). G : in Good condition without dust jacket. 20th century binding with new eps. Some foxing and set-off. Part of December and index missing [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Barter Books Ltd]
 17.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         A collection of decisions of the Court of King's Bench upon the poor's laws, down to the present time. In which are contained many cases never before published; extracted from the notes of a very eminent barrister deceased: the whole digested in a regular order. By a Barrister at Law of The Inner Temple. To which are prefixed, extracts from the Statutes concerning the poor.

      London: printed by W. Strahan and M. Woodfall ..... for P. Uriel and W. Griffin. [1771]. 8vo., (38) + lxxiii + 291 + (3)pp., including the preliminary errata leaf and the final advertisement leaf, with the early signature of a Thomas Preston on front free endpaper, contemporary calf with original red label lettered in gilt, some wear to joints and extremities but still a good, sound, copy. First edition.

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books]
 18.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Arithmetica mercatorum, oder vollständiges kaufmännisches Rechenbuch, in welchem alle Rechnungsarten, so bey der Handlung vorkommen, beygebracht und erklärt werden.

      Wien und Leipzig, J. F. Jahn, 1771 - Gest. Front. 3 nn. Bll., 840 S. 4 nn. Bll. , angebunden ca. 40 leere Blatt für Notizen Einband berieben und bestoßen, Vordergelenk wurde von Laienhand fixiert, Außengelenke angebrochen, Buchblock angebrochen (keine losen Seiten). Titel und Frontispiz mit Beschädigungen in der Falz, Titelblatt mit Einriss, alt hinterlegt (etwas Buchstabenverlust). Stellenweise gebräunt, einzelne Fleckchen die ersten ca. 30 Blatt mit schwachen Feuchtigkeitsrand. Private Widmung auf Vorsatz. Insgesamt befriedigender Zustand. Restaurierungswürdig. Recht seltenes Rechenbuch, gegenüber der Erstauflage 1762 um ein Register erweitert. Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 879 Ledereinband der Zeit, ca. 20,2:12,8 cm.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat im OPUS, Silvia Morch-Israel]
 19.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         MANUSCRIT PIECE SIGNEE PAR LOUIS XV 1771 SUR VELIN FOUCHER D'OBSONVILLE

      - MANUSCRIT PIECE SIGNEE PAR LOUIS XV 1771 SUR VELIN FOUCHER D'OBSONVILLE [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: GEOFFRIAULT]
 20.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Orange & Moth Metamorphosis

      Paris 1771 - This exquisite hand-colored folio engraving is from Maria Sibylla Merian's Histoire generale des insectes de Surinam et de toute l'Europe. Troisieme edition revue, corrigee et considerablement augmentee par M. Buch'oz. a laquelle on a joint une troisiemee partie qui traite des plus belles fleurs. The work was published in Paris by Chez L.C. Desnos in 1771. The engravings were done by J. Mulder, P. Sluyter and A. Stopendaal, all after Merian. The work is considered to be one of the most beautiful if not most famous illustrated natural history works of the 18th century.The work was the result of Merian's trip with her daughter Dorothea to Surinam in 1699. The pair studied and recorded plants and insects for two year under difficult conditions. They came back to Amsterdam with specimens and their work and produced this astounding work. It is 'easily the most magnificent work on insects so far produced . [combining] science and art in unequal proportions, meeting the demands of art at the expense, when necessary, of science. Her portrayals of living insects and other animals were imbued with a charm, a minuteness of observation and an artistic sensibility that had not previously been seen in a natural history book' (Peter Dance, The Art of Natural History , pp.50-51). --- The work is in excellent condition overall. There may be a few minor imperfections to be expected with age. Please review the image carefully for condition and contact us with any questions. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books]
 21.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  

______________________________________________________________________________
More rare books found from 1771


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     561 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service     


Copyright © 2017 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.