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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1645

        Les marques d'honneur de la masion de Tassis

      Antwerp: Balthasar Moretus, 1645. Hardcover. Good. Folio. First edition of a richly illustrated history of the family of Thurn und Taxis. Contemporary blind tooled calf, raised bands. Wear and some abrasions to leather. Joints starting to split. 8 of 9 plates, 3 folding, 25 coats of arms engraved in text, head and tail pieces. Occasional dampstaining in margins, affecting engraved title, minor worming in gutters primarily at back. <br> Published on the occasion of the coming of age of Lamoral Cladius Franz, Count of Taxis. From an early age he had taken an interest in his distinguished family whose fortunes derived from their monopoly on the postal services in the Holy Roman Empire, the Netherlands and Burgundy since the early sixteenth century. Perhaps the most remarkable engraving in the work is the double-page plate by Wenzel Hollar representing the splendid funeral of Jean-Baptise De Tassis, which took place in Cologne 1588. The count had been killed during the siege of the town of Bonn. The work also contains a fine portrait of Count Lamoral engraved by Paul Pontius after Nicholaus van der Horst, both distinguished pupils of Rubens. Both were also responsible for the remarkable double portraits of Muley Hassan, ruler of Tunis in the 1530s, and Johann Baptista, Count of Taxis, both in Arab costume and identical pose. Muley Hassan resided in Johann Baptista's house in Brussels for a few months in 1535 after the capture of his kingdom by the Barbary Pirates. He was reinstated by Charles V later in the same year. Drugulin 765; Funck 291; Hollstein 9: Van der Horst, 50-53, 56, 62-63. Cioranescu 1928

      [Bookseller: SequiturBooks]
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        Count Tilly

      May 15, 1645. Although the famous Count Tilly, Johann Tserklaes, was successful and enjoyed the good graces of the Habsburg Empire, his son was not so lucky. Only thirteen years after the death of the elder Count Tilly, the younger had run up a string of debts to the Habsburg government. In this letter, he pleas for clemency from a Habsburg deputy. He protests that he cannot pay his current taxes, let alone the interest on unpaid army, beer, and land taxes. Here, a man whose father gave his life for the empire could not come up with the money to pay its presumably excessive taxes. He blames his inability to pay on an unnamed enemy and promises to pay as soon as he can. This is a story that gets left out of most histories of the Habsburg Empire. Minor spotting does not affect the text of the letter and the seal is well-preserved. Written in German, the letter is accompanied by a notarized translation.

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
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        POEMS OF MR. JOHN MILTON, BOTH ENGLISH AND LATIN, COMPOSED AT SEVERAL TIMES

      London: Printed by Ruth Raworth for Humphrey Moseley, 1645. First Edition. Hardcover. Octavo, 120 pages; VG; bound in burgundy diced calf, rebacked with closely matching spine with gilt lettering, new endpapers; bookplate of the Warrington Museum on front pastedown; small hole to page 43, 107, covers exactly one letter each; water damage to the entire interior, probably occurred before the most recent rebinding. The lower half along the gutter is largely free of water damage, but the rest faintly stained; top edge pages cut close, with the margin sometimes being removed in its entirety, and the page number cut in half.; title page shows more wear than other pages; Underlining or marginalia on pages 12, 13, 16, 17, 19, 20, 22, 23, 26, 27, 30, 37, 44, 48, 49, 50, 51, 57, Issue with "S." before "Pauls" in imprint, but no priority has been established. The printing has a deep debossed lettering. Lacking frontispiece and Latin poems. While it has the separate titlepage for Comus (a.k.a. A Mask), it is lacking the one for the Latin Poemata. This 1645 collection of Milton's poetry was the only poetry of his to see print until Paradise Lost appeared in 1667. JG consignment; shelved case 0. Dupont.

      [Bookseller: Second Story Books]
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        Gesamtans.

      - Kupferstich v. Merian, 1645, 21,5 x 34

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
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        Der VII Tugenden, Planeten, Töne oder Stimmen. Aufzug. In kunstzierliche Melodien gesetzet. [Fünfter Theil].

      Nürnberg: Wolffgang Endter, 1645. Small oblong octavo. Patterned black cloth boards. [1] (title), [2]-[3] (introduction and notes on musical tones as they relate to the planets and human virtues), [4]-[38] pp. typeset music. Published as Part V of the periodical Frauenzimmer Gesprächspiele edited by Georg Philipp Harsdörffer. Music for solo voices with figured bass and instrumental interludes. Binding slightly worn and rubbed. Browned and stained; some foxing; burns to upper margins with minor loss; some signatures split. Rare. RISM S1645a (2 copies in the U.S. only, at the Newberry and Yale). Staden was a German composer, instrumentalist, organist and theorist, son of Johann Staden. "He was a leading musician in Nuremberg, and though a lesser composer than his father he is perhaps, as the composer of the first extant Singspiel [Seelewig, referred to below], historically more important." The Singspiel Seelewig appeared in 1644 in part iv of Frauenzimmer Gesprächspiele. The complete series of eight parts (1642-9) contains 300 works, nine of which include either music or instructions for music, apparently all by Staden. Seelewig is the only one that is through-composed. It is designated as 'in the Italian manner' and is modelled on the school dramas of the 16th and 17th centuries... The recitatives lack the freedom of their Italian counterparts, and the emphasis on strophic songs, a trait still common in J.P. Krieger's operas 50 years later, retards the dramatic movement. The music in the other eight Gesprächspiele consists of one or more strophic songs and instrumental interludes which appear between sections of spoken dialogue." The elder Staden (1581-1634), "was a distinguished and versatile composer, and one of the outstanding German musicians of his day. In his later years he was the leading musician in Nuremberg and established the so-called Nuremberg school of the 17th century." Harold E. Samuel in Grove Music Online.

      [Bookseller: J & J LUBRANO MUSIC ANTIQUARIANS]
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        Commentatio ad Tres & Viginti Priores Titulos Reformatae..

      1645. A Scarce Treatise on the Customary Law Of a Region of the Netherlands Goris, Lambert [d. 1651]. Commentatio ad Tres & Viginti Priores Titulos Reformatae Consuetudinis Velaviae Ejusque Orae ad Ripam Isulae Fluminis, Partium Ducatus Gelriae & Comitatus Zutphaniae, Cum Translatione Latina Textus Vernaculi: In Qua, A Caeteris Ejusdem Provinciae ad Finitimorum Aliorumque Populorum Legibus ac Moribus, Tum Jurecommuni & Hujus Interpretibus Aliisq; Bonis Autoribus Praedicta Consuetudo, & In Universum Totius Gelriae Mores Illustrantur & Explicantur, Cum Enodatione Difficilium Aliquot Quaestionum Juris. Summaria Passim Sunt Inserta cum Duplici Indice tum Capitum tum Rerum & Verborum Memorabilium. Nijmegen: Ex Typographia Nicolai ab Hervelt, 1645. [xxiv], 428, [4], 20, [22] pp. Quarto (8" x 6-1/4"). Contemporary vellum with lapped edges, early hand-lettered title and publication date to spine. Negligible light soiling, light rubbing to extremities, spine ends bumped, rear hinge cracked, final signature of text block beginning to detach (but still secure), vellum just beginning to crack through pastedowns. Light toning to text, slightly heavier in places. $750. * First edition. This is a commentary on the customary law of Veluwe, a region in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. In the seventeenth century it was prized for its game, forests and other natural resources. Goris was an practicing attorney, state official and law professor. He was, says the Geldersche Consultatien, "a great and jurist." Two other editions his commentary were published in 1664 in Arnheim and Nijmegen. All editions of the book are scarce. OCLC locates 1 copy of the first edition in North America (Harvard Law School). Geldersche Consultatien cited in Roberts, A South African Legal Bibliography 135. Dekkers, Bibliotheca Belgica Juridica 64.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ]
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        La nouvelle fortification

      chez les Elseviers, A Leide 1645 - In folio (mm. 310x210), pp. (14), 224, legatura in piena pergamena coeva. Superbo frontespizio figurato inciso in rame da Adrien Matham con cornice architettonica, veduta a volo d'uccello della città fortificata, allegoria della Guerra circondata da panoplie di armi e vessilli bellici e raffigurazioni di Mercurio e di Ercole. Dedicatoria a Federico Enrico d'Orange e di Nassau. Testatine e iniziali ornate e arabescate. Oltre 90 tavole calcografiche intercalate nel testo. Ex libris di Tycho Wing al contropiatto. Piccolo risarcimento al margine basso del frontespizio, lievissimi aloni secchi di umidità su poche pagine, ma esemplare assai buelle e genuino. Prima edizione francese voltata dal medesimo autore dall'edizione latina, che è di due anni precedente. L'opera è assai significativa nella storia della trattatistica fortificatoria poiché con essa si determina l'affermazione di uno nuovo indirizzo scientifico-matematico negli studi di ingegneria fortificatoria. Bibliografia: Willems, 587; Marini, p.88 "In questa edizione non si trovano aggiunte, ma è peraltro più magnifica di quella del 1643 tanto pel testo, quanto per le figure, ed è ancora più comoda a motivo che le tavole de' calcoli e delle figure sono stampate nelle medesime pagine del testo. Questi elementi contengono la sola parte matematica e puramente descrittiva delle fortificazioni; in essi si rinviene non solo il metodo per calcolare i perimetri, ma ancora la superficie e le solidità delle fortificazioni, accompagnato da una quantità di tavole molto istruttive. Questa è una delle parti più interessanti della scienza fortificatrice, ma dal maggior numero degli scrittori trascurata". Brunet, II, 1650. Graesse, III, 112 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: AU SOLEIL D'OR Studio Bibliografico]
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        Dissertationes de studiis instituendis

      apud Ludovicum Elzevirium, 1645. Cm. 13, pp. (8) 688. Con bel frontespizio finemente inciso in rame. Ottima legatura coeva in piena pergamena rigida con titoli ms. al dorso. Qualche sporadico lieve alone. Esemplare fresco e ben conservato. Interessante e rara miscellanea di 24 trattatelli di taglio storiografico. Il metodo storico e lo studio delle "arti liberali" sono l'oggetto degli scritti di Grozio, Naudé, Clapmarius, Erasmo, Schioppius e soprattutto Campanella del quale viene pubblicato lo scritto "De libris propriis et recta ratione studendi". Rara prima edizione postuma che si distingue dalla seconda (uscita nello stesso anno e con gli stessi dati tipografici) per una differente numerazione delle pagine. Cfr. Willems, 1028..

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Apuleio]
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        Der VII Tugenden, Planeten, Töne oder Stimmen. Aufzug. In kunstzierliche Melodien gesetzet. [Fünfter Theil]

      Nürnberg: Wolffgang Endter, 1645. Rare. RISM S1645a (2 copies in the U.S. only, at the Newberry and Yale). Staden was a German composer, instrumentalist, organist and theorist, son of Johann Staden. "He was a leading musician in Nuremberg, and though a lesser composer than his father he is perhaps, as the composer of the first extant Singspiel [Seelewig, referred to below], historically more important." The Singspiel Seelewig appeared in 1644 in part iv of Frauenzimmer Gesprächspiele. The complete series of eight parts (1642-9) contains 300 works, nine of which include either music or instructions for music, apparently all by Staden. Seelewig is the only one that is through-composed. It is designated as 'in the Italian manner' and is modelled on the school dramas of the 16th and 17th centuries... The recitatives lack the freedom of their Italian counterparts, and the emphasis on strophic songs, a trait still common in J.P. Krieger's operas 50 years later, retards the dramatic movement. The music in the other eight Gesprächspiele consists of one or more strophic songs and instrumental interludes which appear between sections of spoken dialogue." The elder Staden (1581-1634), "was a distinguished and versatile composer, and one of the outstanding German musicians of his day. In his later years he was the leading musician in Nuremberg and established the so-called Nuremberg school of the 17th century." Harold E. Samuel in Grove Music Online.. Small oblong octavo. Patterned black cloth boards. [1] (title), [2]-[3] (introduction and notes on musical tones as they relate to the planets and human virtues), [4]-[38] pp. typeset music. Published as Part V of the periodical Frauenzimmer Gesprächspiele edited by Georg Philipp Harsdörffer. Music for solo voices with figured bass and instrumental interludes. Binding slightly worn and rubbed. Browned and stained; some foxing; burns to upper margins with minor loss; some signatures split.

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
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        Amsterdami Apud Iohannem et Cornelium Blaeu Anno XXXXI.

      Artist: Blaeu Willem Janszoon (d) ; issued in: Amsterdam; date: (d)1645 - - technic: Copper print; - colorit: original colored; - condition: Very good; - size (in cm): 39 x 24; - description: Titlepage of the 'Theatrum Orbis Terrarum'.; - vita of the artist: Joan Guilliemus Blaeu was the eldest son of Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638), and was probably born in Alkmaar in the province of Noord-Holland in the final years of the 16th century. He was brought up in Amsterdam, and studied law at the University of Leiden before going into partnership with his father in the 1630s. Although his father Willem had cartographic interests, having studied under the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe and having manufactured globes and instruments, his primary business was as a printer. It was under the control of Joan that the Blaeu printing press achieved lasting fame by moving towards the printing of maps and expanding to become the largest printing press in Europe in the 17th century.By the 1660s the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum (or Atlas Maior as it had became known by this time) had expanded to between 9 and 12 volumes, depending on the language. With over 3,000 text pages and approximately 600 maps, it was the most expensive book money could buy in the later 17th century. The translation of the text from Latin into Dutch, English, German, French, and Spanish for several volumes created enormous work for those involved in typography and letterpress activities. It is estimated that over 80 men must have been employed full-time in the Blaeu printing house in Bloemgracht, not including engravers who worked elsewhere, with over 15 printing presses running simultaneously, and in 1667 a second press was acquired at Gravenstraat. At the same time as producing the Atlas Maior, Blaeu was also publishing town plans of Italy, maps for globes, and other volumes. At its peak the Blaeu press managed to produce over 1 million impressions from 1,000 copper plates within four years.

      [Bookseller: Antique Sommer& Sapunaru KG]
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        Commentatio ad Tres & Viginti Priores Titulos Reformatae.

      1645 - A Scarce Treatise on the Customary Law Of a Region of the Netherlands Goris, Lambert [d. 1651]. Commentatio ad Tres & Viginti Priores Titulos Reformatae Consuetudinis Velaviae Ejusque Orae ad Ripam Isulae Fluminis, Partium Ducatus Gelriae & Comitatus Zutphaniae, Cum Translatione Latina Textus Vernaculi: In Qua, A Caeteris Ejusdem Provinciae ad Finitimorum Aliorumque Populorum Legibus ac Moribus, Tum Jurecommuni & Hujus Interpretibus Aliisq; Bonis Autoribus Praedicta Consuetudo, & In Universum Totius Gelriae Mores Illustrantur & Explicantur, Cum Enodatione Difficilium Aliquot Quaestionum Juris. Summaria Passim Sunt Inserta cum Duplici Indice tum Capitum tum Rerum & Verborum Memorabilium. Nijmegen: Ex Typographia Nicolai ab Hervelt, 1645. [xxiv], 428, [4], 20, [22] pp. Quarto (8" x 6-1/4"). Contemporary vellum with lapped edges, early hand-lettered title and publication date to spine. Negligible light soiling, light rubbing to extremities, spine ends bumped, rear hinge cracked, final signature of text block beginning to detach (but still secure), vellum just beginning to crack through pastedowns. Light toning to text, slightly heavier in places. $750. * First edition. This is a commentary on the customary law of Veluwe, a region in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. In the seventeenth century it was prized for its game, forests and other natural resources. Goris was an practicing attorney, state official and law professor. He was, says the Geldersche Consultatien, "a great and jurist." Two other editions his commentary were published in 1664 in Arnheim and Nijmegen. All editions of the book are scarce. OCLC locates 1 copy of the first edition in North America (Harvard Law School). Geldersche Consultatien cited in Roberts, A South African Legal Bibliography 135. Dekkers, Bibliotheca Belgica Juridica 64. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., ABAA ILAB]
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        Der VII Tugenden, Planeten, Töne oder Stimmen. Aufzug. In kunstzierliche Melodien gesetzet. [Fünfter Theil]

      Wolffgang Endter, Nürnberg 1645 - Small oblong octavo. Patterned black cloth boards. [1] (title), [2]-[3] (introduction and notes on musical tones as they relate to the planets and human virtues), [4]-[38] pp. typeset music.Published as Part V of the periodical Frauenzimmer Gesprächspiele edited by Georg Philipp Harsdörffer.Music for solo voices with figured bass and instrumental interludes. Binding slightly worn and rubbed. Browned and stained; some foxing; burns to upper margins with minor loss; some signatures split. Rare. RISM S1645a (2 copies in the U.S. only, at the Newberry and Yale).Staden was a German composer, instrumentalist, organist and theorist, son of Johann Staden. "He was a leading musician in Nuremberg, and though a lesser composer than his father he is perhaps, as the composer of the first extant Singspiel [Seelewig, referred to below], historically more important." The Singspiel Seelewig appeared in 1644 in part iv of Frauenzimmer Gesprächspiele. The complete series of eight parts (1642-9) contains 300 works, nine of which include either music or instructions for music, apparently all by Staden. Seelewig is the only one that is through-composed. It is designated as 'in the Italian manner' and is modelled on the school dramas of the 16th and 17th centuries. The recitatives lack the freedom of their Italian counterparts, and the emphasis on strophic songs, a trait still common in J.P. Krieger's operas 50 years later, retards the dramatic movement. The music in the other eight Gesprächspiele consists of one or more strophic songs and instrumental interludes which appear between sections of spoken dialogue." The elder Staden (1581-1634), "was a distinguished and versatile composer, and one of the outstanding German musicians of his day. In his later years he was the leading musician in Nuremberg and established the so-called Nuremberg school of the 17th century." Harold E. Samuel in Grove Music Online. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: J & J LUBRANO MUSIC ANTIQUARIANS LLC]
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        Wolffgangi Hildebrands new augirte, weitverbesserte und vielvermehrte magia naturalis: Das ist Künst und Wunderbüch, darinne begriffe wunderbare secreta, Geheimnüsse, und Kunststücke, wie man nemlich mit dem gantzen menschlichen Cörper, zahmen und wilden Thieren, Vogeln, Fischen, Unziffern ind Insecten, allerley Gwächsen Pflantzungen, und sonsten fast unerhörte wunderbarliche Sachen verrichten, auch etliche Wunderschrifften künstlich bereiten, zu Schimpffm kurtzweil, löblicher und lustiger Vöung, und zu Nutz gebrauchen, und damit die Zeit vertreiben Kan. [...]. 1-4.

      Erfurt, in Verlegung Johann Birckners Buchhändlers, 1645-50. 4to. (8),+ 50,+ (2); (1),+ 53,+ (2); (1),+ 35,+ (4); (1),+ 27,+ (4) ll. First title printed in red and black and a wood cut portrait on page (8). The last title leaf with spot and tear in corner, some more spotting in the last two parts. contemporary vellum. Owner's mark on tail edge. VD17 1:001130M. The first part with imprint 1650, the second with 1649, the third with 1645, and the fourth 1650. Part three is printed by Peter Schmidt in Arnstadt. One of many reprint of Wolfgang Hildebrand's (1571-1635) very popular hand book or "natural magic", first published in one part in 1610 and already in 1611 expanded into four parts.

      [Bookseller: Centralantikvariatet]
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        NUMISMATA AEREA IMPERATORUM, AUGUSTURUM, ET

      DANIELEM HORTHEMELS, PARIS - Páginas: 244 + 267 Año: 1645 Medidas: 40,5 x 25 cm. Ilustraciones o Grabados: Si ( Infinidad de grabados de monedas romanas ) Fotografías: No Tapa: Piel original de la época. Buen estado de conservación. Buena restauración, conserva encuadernación de época. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: La Clandestina books]
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        2 Gesamtans. auf 1 Blatt.

      - Kupferstich v. Merian, 1645, je 12 x 33

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
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        Vite dei dodeci Visconti che signoreggiarono Milano ... Tradotte da Lodovico Domenichi. Et in quest'ultima impressione accresciute

      in casa di Gio. Battista Bidelli, 1645. Pp. (20) 132 [splendida antiporta raffigurante due putti che sorreggono l'insegna milanese, dati tipografici al centro ed aquila con due uomini incatenati alla base; 14 splendidi ritratti incisi in rame a piena pagina, l'ultimo dei quali ripetuto]. Unito a: CAMPO ANTONIO. Historia delle vite de' duchi et duchesse di Milano, con i loro veri ritratti cavati al naturale. In Milano, per Filippo Ghisolfi, 1642. Pp. 32 [con 24 splendidi ritratti incisi in rame n.t.]. Due opere in un volume di cm. 25. Bella legatura primi Novecento in mezza pelle con ampie punte, dorso a 4 nervi von titoli e filetti dorati, carta marmorizzata ai piatti. Abile restauro a p. 55 della prima opera (con superficiale abrasione di qualche lettera nel punto posto a fronte a p. 54, forse per un'antica aderenza delle due carte), qualche abilissimo restauto ai margini bianchi della seconda opera [due cc. rifilate di qualche mm. nel margine basso. Esemplare stampato su carta forte, e, soprattutto per quanto concerne la prima opera, caratterizzato da carta immacolata. Bell'esemplare. Prima opera: Paolo Giovio (1483-1552), celebre storico comasco, va annovarato tra le figure più illustri del Cinquecento italiano. Quest'opera, già tradotta in volgare nel 1558, ricavò un implementato prestigio editoriale grazie a quest'importante apparato iconografico. Cfr. Brunet, III, 584; Graesse, III, 490; Iccu. Seconda opera: Antonio Campo, si ritagliò grande fama per un'importante storia di Cremona scritta nella seconda metà del Cinquecento e di cui questa "Historia delle vite" configura il quarto libro, nonché la seconda parte, tipograficamente autonoma. Rarissimo. Cfr. Graesse, II, 30, per un'edizione erroneamente segnalata 1612 (recte 1642); Lozzi, 2614 n., menziona infatti l'edizione del 1642..

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Apuleio]
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        De Unicornu Observationes Nouae. Accesserunt de Aureo Corno CL. V. Olai Vvormii. Eruditorum Iudicia.

      Padua, Typis Gribellianis, 1645. 8vo. 304 + (22) pp. 11 engraved illustrations and 1 woodcut illustration in the text. Contemporary vellum. Inscribed by Thomas Bartholin on the title-page. The rare first edition of Thomas Bartholin`s book dealing with the unicorn and other horned creatures, based on his father Caspar Bartholin`s treatise on the same subject in Opuscula "De unicornu" from 1628. In 1636 Ole Worm concluded that the horn of unicorn actually came from the narwhale.. . Bibl. Dan, II, 160. Thesaurus 362.

      [Bookseller: Ruuds Antikvariat]
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        Gesamtans., ( Aufsicht ) mit Darstellung der Belagerung 1547, "Warhafftig abcontraseyung der Stadt Leiptzig.", darunter Erklärungen v. 1 - 16 und 1 - 22.

      - Kupferstich aus Hortleder ( Schmalkaldischer Krieg ) b. Wolfgang Endter, 1645, 20 x 32 Nicht bei Fauser.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
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        Gesamtans., ( Aufsicht) mit Darstellung der Belagerung 1542, "Wahrhaffte Abcontrafactur, welcher gestalt Schloß und Statt Wolfenbüttel .".

      - Kupferstich aus Hortleder ( Schmalkaldischer Krieg ) b. Wolfgang Endter, 1645, 19,7 x 32,5 Nicht bei Fauser. - Mit Erklärungen von 1 - 22 unter der Darstellung.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
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        Moscva

      1645. Incisione in rame, mm 268x348, colorato ad acquerello. Tratta da "Neuwe Archontologia cosmica" di Johann Gottfried. Bella veduta a volo d'uccello della città, situata alla confluenza della Moscova e della Neglinnaya, che mostra Cremlino e centro antico della città. Buon esemplare Copper engraving, mm 268x348, colored. From "Neuwe Archontologia cosmica" by Johann Gottfried. Nice bird-eye view of Moscow situated at the junction of the Moskva and Neglinnaya Rivers. The view shows the Kremlin and the old city.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Perini s.a.s.]
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        Dissertationes de studiis instituendis.Amsterodami, apud Ludovicum Elzevirium, 1645.

      Amsterodami, apud Ludovicum Elzevirium 1645 - Cm. 13, pp. (8) 688. Con bel frontespizio finemente inciso in rame. Ottima legatura coeva in piena pergamena rigida con titoli ms. al dorso. Qualche sporadico lieve alone. Esemplare fresco e ben conservato. Interessante e rara miscellanea di 24 trattatelli di taglio storiografico. Il metodo storico e lo studio delle "arti liberali" sono l'oggetto degli scritti di Grozio, NaudÃ&#131;©, Clapmarius, Erasmo, Schioppius e soprattutto Campanella del quale viene pubblicato lo scritto "De libris propriis et recta ratione studendi". Rara prima edizione postuma che si distingue dalla seconda (uscita nello stesso anno e con gli stessi dati tipografici) per una differente numerazione delle pagine. Cfr. Willems, 1028. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Apuleio]
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        Stammtafeln mehrerer Gauner-Familien in der Provinz Niederhessen. Nebst einem Rundschreiben an die kurfürstlichen Kreisräthe und die Fürstlich Rotenburgischen Beamten.

      V S., 25 genealogische Tafeln. Pappband d. Zt. Qu.-Folio. 19,5 x 34 cm. Avé-Lallement I, 263 Huelke/Etzler 1645 Fijnaut/Paoli, Organised Crime in Europe 148. - Sehr seltene kriminalistische Veröffentlichung, die allerlei jenische Familien genealogisch dokumentiert: Bindemann, Deutscher, Kreutz (ausdrücklich als "Zigeuner" ausgewiesen), Steinbach (ebenso als "Zigeuner" ausgewiesen) u.a. Pfeiffer war Polizei-Direktor und Regierungsrat der Provinz Niederhessen. - Etwas berieben, Rückenbezug angerissen. Insgesamt recht gutes Exemplar!

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Turszynski]
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        Tractatus duo posthumus. I. De Morbis ante partum, in partu, post partu. II. De Purificatione rerum infectarum post pestilentiam.

      Lyon, Petri Ravaud, 1645.. in-8. 8ff. 320pp. Parchemin de l'époque (manques au dos, coins émoussés). Rousseurs prononcés. Petites mouillures éparses. Cachet ancien sur la page de titre. Ex-libris manuscrits. Première édition posthume de cet ouvrage du célèbre médecin de Montpellier François Ranchin. Publié quatre années après sa mort, il contient un premier texte concernant les pathologies qui accompagnent la grossesse et l'accouchement. Il est suivi d'un traité complet sur la peste dans lequel Ranchin aborde les aspects sanitaires et pharmaceutiques des épidémes, le rôle de l'administration et des autorités, les problèmes d'hygiène publique, etc.

      [Bookseller: ULTIMO CAPITULO]
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        Livre d'architecture d'autels, et de cheminees. "Paris", sold by Cornelis Danckerts in Amsterdam, 1641. Series of 20 numbered engravings, including the title-print, Barbet's dedication to Cardinal Richelieu, a note to the reader and 17 finely designed and engraved altars and chimney pieces. With:(2) MITELLI, Agostino. [Model cartouches.] All[e]r[!] Ill[ustrissi]mo. Sig[no]r: Fran[ces]co: Maria Zambeccari.[Paris?], Rousel, "1636" [ca. 1641/42?]. Series of 16 numbered engravings, including the title-print (with no title) and 15 large ornamental, cartouches, many with grotesque masks.(3) RABEL, Daniel. Cartouches de diferentes inventions, tres utilles a plussieurs sortes de personnes.Paris, Francois l'Anglois dit Ch(i)artres, [ca. 1645?]. 2 se

      - Ad 1: BAL 187 note; Fruling, Ornament prints 9099-9100 note; ad 2: Fuhring 1115-1137 note; ad 3: Berlin Kat. 309; Fruhling 1040-1051 (lacking title plate) & 1052-1064; Le Blanc III, p. 263, Rabel 3 (one series only). Four series of models for architectural ornament, bound together in contemporary vellum. Ad 1: First printing from the Danckerts plates of a series of ornamental designs for altars and chimney-pieces, richly and beautifully executed with decorative carvings, sculpture and paintings in the influential styles popular in France under Louis XIII. In 1630 Jean Barbet, draughtsman and engraver, signed a two-year contract with the publisher Melchior Tavernier to make the drawings for the present series. Tavernier published it at Paris in 1633, engraved by Abraham Bosse. Cornelis Danckerts copied the series in mirror image.Ad 2: Paris edition, with imprint "Rousel exc.", of a beautiful series of large ornamental cartouches, originally designed by Agostino Mitelli, Italian architect and engraver. The present Paris edition has 16 plates, all containing cartouches. Ad 3: Two series of very refined and beautiful cartouches, but instead of blank cartouches as in ad 2, these all surround beautifully engraved scenes. They are printed from the plates of the first edition in their second state. The first series puts more emphasis on people and their activities within the landscape, and the second on the often mountainous landscapes themselves. Some of the cartouches are fantastic and bizarre, with sometimes grotesque real and imaginary creatures, such as the elephant heads in plate 1 of the first series, their trunks curling around to form the lower corners of the cartouche. Daniel Rabel, French artist and engraver, also published model series of costumes, birds and insects. His present cartouches are fine examples of style and fashion in Louis XIII's France. From the library of Lunsingh Scheurleer. In very good condition, with only an occasional minor smudge or marginal stain, and with ample margins. The boards are somewhat bowed and the vellum slightly stained, but the binding is generally also very good. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        Tractatus de Alimentis, Nouem Partibus seu Titulis sistinctus: In quo Universa Alimentorum. Opus Magnae et Infinitae Doctrinae, Omnibus tum Theoricis, tum Practicis, apprime utile ac necessarium.

      N.p. (Geneva?) Stephanum Gamonetum. 1645. - folio. 32.5cm, [8],755,[109]p., double column, rubricated vignette title page, several elaborate woodcut head pieces & ornaments, index, bound in early full speckled calf, real raised bands, blind stamped borders in the panels, light tan crushed morocco label gilt, edges tinted red, marbled endpapers, a fine copy (cgc) An early legal treatise on the laws of alimony published first in Venice in 1594. The author, from northern Italy, was one of the most celebrated jurists of his time. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: J. Patrick McGahern Books Inc. (ABAC)]
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        Les Oeuvres de Mr De Balzac Derniere Edition Premiere Partie Lettres de Mr De Balzac Derniere Edition Seconde Partie

      King Charles I's copy, with his autograph ink motto and cypher   2 Vols. 8vo. [32], 622, [6 (Table)]; [4], 470, [4] (Table) pp. [Binding: 161 x 109 mm]. Contemporary English plain black morocco, the covers ruled in gilt with a single gilt fillet with a gilt dot at the corners; smooth spines framed with a double gilt fillet with a dot at the corners like the covers; plain endleaves; gilt edges (joints rubbed, a few small scuffs on the spines).   Rouen: Chez Iean Berthelin,

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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        Myles Standish

      March 13, [1645]. An unusually ornate and fine content manuscript Document Signed by approximately 74 individuals, mostly with marks, together with vellum strips affixed to the bottom (some adorned with additional manuscript) and many bearing small wax seals, one page, 22.5" x 17" with scallop top, Duxbury, Lancashire, March 13, [1645]. Extremely light toning at expected folds, majority of text quite bright and distinct. <br /><br />Richard Standish (1620 - 1662) English politician who sat in the House of Commons for Preston from 1659 - 60. Richard was the son of Thomas Standish (c. 1593 - 1642) who sat in Parliament for Preston during the Short Parliament of 1640 and in the Long Parliament until 1642. Standish, who lived at Duxbury Manor in Lancashire, was very possibly a relative of Myles Standish, one of the founders of Plymouth Colony in 1620.<br /><br />An unusual document in which the approximately seventy named individuals, residents of Duxbury, Chorley, Heath Charnock, collectively sell their lands and homes to Richard Standish for the sum of £1000. The document appears to be part of Standish's consolidation of control over Duxbury Manor which had been in the hands of his father Thomas Standish, who died around 1642.<br /><br />Much is known and has been written concerning the life of Myles Standish (c. 1584 - 1656) after he became associated with the English Separatists (i.e. Pilgrims) who founded the colony of Plymouth in 1620. However, very little is known about Standish's early life including his place of birth, and for nearly two centuries, this question has been been the subject of scholarly debate. The little we know about Standish's origins come from his will, drafted in 1656, in which he granted to his "son & heire apparent Alexander Standish all my lands as heire apparent by lawfull decent in Ormskirke Borscouge Wrightington Maudsley Newburrow Crowston and in the Isle of man and given to mee as Right heire by lawfull decent but Surruptuously detained from mee My great Grandfather being a 2cond or younger brother from the house of Standish of Standish."(Charles H. Simmons, Jr., Plymouth Colony Records, Volume 1, Wills and Inventories 1633-1669 ,Camden, ME: Picton Press, 1996, 312-314) Of all the places named, one is on the Isle of Man while the remaining are places in Lancashire where a branch of the Standish family resided, centered at Duxbury Hall. A short passage written by Plymouth Colony's secretary, Nathaniel Morton notes a similar origin for Standish, noting he "...was a gentleman, born in Lancashire, and was heir apparent unto a great estate of lands and livings, surreptitiously detained from him; his great grandfather being a second or younger brother from the house of Standish…" (Nathaniel Morton, New England's Memorial, Boston: Congregational Board of Publication, 1855, 6th ed., 170). Unfortunately, that is all that is known about his origins. However, the fact that Standish founded the town of Duxbury in Plymouth Colony would suggest that his origins were indeed from Lancashire and not the Isle of Man. It is not known whether Alexander Standish (1626 - 1702) ever pursued these claims. <br />

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
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        Befestigungsplan mit Truppenstellungen und Karte der Umgebungim Jahre 1645 ('Plan de la Ville de Dinckespuhel en Soube assiegée par les Armées du Roy tres cres tien Louis xuy àsisté des troupes de Made. la Landgrave de Hesse comandées par Monseigr. le Duc d'Anguiengnal des armées de sa Mate. en Alemagne le 19 Aoust et rendue a lób eissance du Roy le 26 dudit moys en suiuant 1645').

      - Kupferstich aus Les glorieuses conquêtes de Louis le Grand b. Sébastien de Pontault de Beaulieu dit le Donjon in Paris, 1646, 45 x 53,5 Tooley's Dic. of Mapm., S. 45. - Befestigungsplan mit Truppenstellungen und Karte der Umgebung im Jahre 1645. - Am unteren Rand Soldatenszenerie. - Unten rechts Insetkarte '"Carte du Gouvernement de Dinckespuhel" mit Dinkeslbühl und Umgebung. - Oben rechts Erklärungen. - Oben links Titelkartusche. - Das Blatt mit prachtvoller Bordüre verziert. - Perfekter Zustand!

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Norbert Haas]
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        Anglicus, Peace or no Peace. 1645. A Probable Conjecture of the State of England, and the present Differences betwixt His Majestie and the Parliament of England now sitting at Westminster, for this present yeer, 1645.

      The Cock in Ludgate-street, London: John Partridge and Humphrey Blunden, 1645. pp[viii][88]. William Lilly (1602-1681) was a celebrated astrologer who found himself at the center of London society at a time of great change - when the Parliament was asserting its rights over King Charles I. He found himself in the company of members of the "Long Parliament" of 1640-1660, and only fell out of favor after the Restoration of Charles II. Bound in half-leather, with chips missing from surface of boards. Title page foxed and with small closed tear. First eight pages trimmed closely. . First Edition. Hard Cover. Good.

      [Bookseller: Dark and Stormy Night Books]
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        Anatomical Print-REPRODUCTIVE ORGAN-VAGINA-URINAL TRACT-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. VIII, Tab. XVII. Plate, showing various images (including cross-sections) of the female abdomen and reproductive organ. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casserius (Giulio Casseri: 1552?1616). His best written work on anatomy is De humani

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
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        Tractatus de Alimentis, Nouem Partibus seu Titulis sistinctus: In quo Universa Alimentorum. Opus Magnae et Infinitae Doctrinae, Omnibus tum Theoricis, tum Practicis, apprime utile ac necessarium.

      N.p. (Geneva?) Stephanum Gamonetum. 1645.. Hardcover. Book folio. 32.5cm, [8],755,[109]p., double column, rubricated vignette title page, several elaborate woodcut head pieces & ornaments, index, bound in early full speckled calf, real raised bands, blind stamped borders in the panels, light tan crushed morocco label gilt, edges tinted red, marbled endpapers, a fine copy (cgc) An early legal treatise on the laws of alimony published first in Venice in 1594. The author, from northern Italy, was one of the most celebrated jurists of his time. .

      [Bookseller: Patrick McGahern Books, Inc. (ABAC)]
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        Anatomical Print-MAN-REPRODUCTIVE ORGAN-PENIS-TESTES-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. VIII, Tab. XVI. Plate, showing various images (including cross-sections) of the male reproductive organ. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casserius (Giulio Casseri: 1552?1616). His best written work on anatomy is De humani corporis fabri

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
 32.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Hantonia Sive Southantonensis Comitatus Vulgo Hantshire. Original Antique Engraved Hand Coloured Map of Hampshire. With, Arms of Nobles and County Crest. Description of County on Rear.

      W. Blaeu, 1645. Framed size approx 26 x 23 inches. Engraved surfaces approx 20 x 16 ins. Double-glazed in gold wood frame with ivory mount behind glass. (Front and Back.) In very good condition. Some darkening/tanning to paper, vertical centre crease. Lovely bright, crisp colouring. A beautiful clean example. Original engraved map with hand colouring.

      [Bookseller: The Antique Map & Bookshop]
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        Antique Book-BOCCACCIO-ILLUSTRATED-Hooghe-Bocaccio-1702 (vol. 1), 1698 (vol. 2)

      - Cologne: Jacques Gaillard (vol. 1) / Amsterdam: George Gallet (vol. 2). 8vo: [xiv], 366, [x]; 427, [xiii] pp. Full leather. Contemporary full calf with five raised bands and gilt decoration and titling to the spine. Gilt ruled board edges and turn-ins (volume 1 only). A composite set comprising two different editions. While the title of volume 1 states 'Seconde Edition', it is really the third edition. The second volume is first edition. Etching/engraving for the start of each story. Illustrations by: Romeyn de Hooghe Antique Book, titled: 'Contes et Nouvelles de Bocace Florentin.', by: Giovanni Boccaccio. According to the title page a 'free translation, accommodated to the taste of the time. The first volume claims the illustrations were engraved by various engravers. The illustrations in the second volume were etched by De Hooghe himself.Artists and Engravers: Author(s): Giovanni Boccaccio. Giovanni Boccaccio (Certaldo or Florence, 1313 &#150; 1375, Certaldo) was a Florentine poet, author and humanist. Illustrated by: Romeyn de Hooghe (bapt. 1645-1708) was an important and prolific late Dutch Baroque, painter, sculptor, engraver and caricaturist. De Hooghe was born in Amsterdam. He was skilled as an etcher, draughtsman, painter, sculptor and medalist. He is best known for political caricatures of Louis XIV and propagandistic prints supporting William of Orange. During his career, de Hooghe produced over 3500 prints. He also illustrated books, and his illustrations can be found in some of the most important texts of his period. The Hieroglyphica of Merkbeelden der oude volkeren (1735) was a well known emblem book and sourcebook for classical mythology and its iconography. According to Houbraken he was particularly good at inventive arrangements of subjects in engravings. Condition: Good, given age. Hinges split but the boards attached. Board edges quite worn, spines cracked but intact.One quire in the middle nearly detached. Seccond volume dampstained. Flyleaves of the first volume separated. Storage location: TPCZolder-Krat 8 8vo: 4.26 x 6.42 inch. 8vo: 10.8 x 16.3 cm. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
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        A Collection of Ancient and Moderne Prophesies Concerning the Present Times, with Modest Observations thereon. The Nativities of Thomas Earle of Strafford, and William Laud, Late Archbishop of Canterbury, His Majesties great Favorites. Astrological Judgements upon their Scheames; And the Speech intended by the Earle of Strafford to have been spoken at his Death. [Bound with] Anglicus, Peace or no Peace. [Bound with] An Astrological Judgement upon His Majesties Present Martch.

      Sign of the Cocke in Ludgate Streete, London: John Partridge and Humphrey Blunden, 1645. pp[8]1-54[1][8]1-88[12]. Three books bound in one. Two by William Lilly: "A Collection of Ancient and Moderne Prophesies", and "Anglicus, Peace or no Peace". One by George Wharton: "An Astrological Judgement upon His Majesties Present Martch: Begun from Oxford, May 7, 1645." William Lilly (1602-1681) was a celebrated astrologer who found himself at the center of London society at a time of great change, when the Parliament was asserting its rights over King Charles I. He found himself in the company of members of the "Long Parliament" of 1640-1660, and only fell out of favor after the Restoration of Charles II. Bound in half-leather, with some wear to the edges of the boards. . First Edition. Hard Cover. Good.

      [Bookseller: Dark and Stormy Night Books]
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        Rare Antique Master Print-PORTRAIT-CHRISTIAN RUMPF-PHYSICIAN-Danckerts-ca. 1645

      - Antique Master Print, titled: 'Christianus Rompf ' - Portrait of Christian Rumpf, physician to Frederik Hendrik of Orange and Frederick of Bohemia. Engraving on laid paper. Watermark: Five pointed foolscap. (=period) Description: Source unknown, to be determined. State: Second state of 4. Ref: Hollstein 6. Impression with the signature in pen. Rare, only one sold with this in 1909.Artists and Engravers: Made by 'Hendrik Danckerts' after own design. Hendrik Danckerts (ca. 1625-1680) worked in The Hague. He travelled to Italy and England. Condition: Very good, given age. Ample margins, old central fold . Attached to carrier sheet. General age-related toning and/or occasional minor defects from handling. Please study scan carefully. Storage location: R1-043 LATPC The overall size is ca. 11 x 14.4 inch. The image size is ca. 10 x 13.2 inch. The overall size is ca. 27.9 x 36.5 cm. The image size is ca. 25.3 x 33.5 cm.

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
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        5 Rare Antique Anatomical Prints-MUSCLE-BACK-MAN-LAYER-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical prints. Plate, Lib. IV, Tab. III-VII. Set of 5 plates, showing the muscles of the back of a man. Each of the plates shows a deeper layer of muscle. The portraits are full-length, in a decorated landscape background. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casseri

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        2 Rare Antique Anatomical Prints-MAN-NAKED-MODEL-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical prints. Plate, Lib. I, Tab. I & II. Two plates, one showing a full-length portrait of a naked man, seen from the front. The other shows the rear of a naked man. Both of these plates with a decorative background. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casserius (

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        3 Rare Anatomical Prints-STOMACH-PERITONEUM-MUSCLE-MAN-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. VIII, Tab. I-III. Set of 3 plates, showing the peritoneum, and muscles of the stomach just below the skin, of standing naked men. These are portrayed from the knee up, against a decorative landscape background. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and

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        2 Antique Prints-ABDOMINAL CAVITY-ORGANS-KIDNEY-BLADDER-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. VIII, Tab. XI-XII. Set of 2 plates, showing portraits of standing naked men, from the knee up. The stomachs of both men have been opened, revealing the organs in the abdominal cavity - spleen, liver, kidneys, testes, bladder and the associated main blood vessels. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he stu

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        2 Anatomical Prints-ABDOMINAL CAVITY-INTESTINES-MAN-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. V, Tab. I-II. Set of two plates of naked male anatomical models, assisting in revealing the interior of their stomach. Shows are intestines, peritoneum, and generally the abdominal cavity. The blood vessels in the skin are clearly visible. Both men are depcited within decorated landscape backgrounds. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, su

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        2 Antique Anatomical Prints-MAN-NAKED-MUSCLE-CHEST-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. IV, Tab. XVIII-XIX. Two plates showing a sitting naked man with exposed chest muscles. The figures are shown full-length within a decorative landscape background. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casserius (Giulio Casseri: 1552?1616). Hi

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        4 Anatomical Prints-MAMMARY GLAND-BREAST-LIVER-BLADDER-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Tab. I-IV. Set of 4 plates and complete section of the book titled "De Venis Lacteis". These four plates and text deal with female breast tissue and the mammary gland. One of the plates shows the gall bladder, liver and bile duct. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (

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        2 Anatomical Prints-ORGANS-FEMALE-KIDNEY-WOMB-BLADDER-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. VIII, Tab. XX-XXI. Set of 2 plates, showing the female organs kidneys, bladder, spleen and womb. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casserius (Giulio Casseri: 1552?1616). His best written work on anatomy is De humani corporis fabrica libri

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
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        2 Anatomical Prints-TESTES-BLADDER-REPRODUCTIVE ORGAN-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. VIII, Tab. XIII-XIV. Set of 2 plates, showing the male organs kidney, bladder, testes and the penis. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casserius (Giulio Casseri: 1552?1616). His best written work on anatomy is De humani corporis fabrica l

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
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        2 Anatomical Prints-ARTERY-BLOOD VESSEL-VEIN-HUMAN-Spigelius-Casserius-1645

      - Very rare anatomical print. Plate, Lib. VI, Tab. II-III. Set of 2 plates, showing the veins, arteries and blood vessels of a standing human figure, seen from the front. As the key to this plate(s) is on the rear of previous plate, as issued, a copy of this key is included when applicable. Copperplate engraving on a verge type handlaid paper. Description: This very fine engraving originates from 'Anatomica operum omnium' by Adrianus Spigelius (Adriaan van den Spiegel), published by J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1645. This splendidly produced edition of Spigelius' Collected Works was edited by the Dutch physician, Johannes Antonides van der Linden. This folio volume is illustrated with 117 anatomical plates. 78 Of these plates originate from Casserius, intended to illustrate his 'Theatrum Anatomicum', a great anatomical atlas that was still unpublished at his death in 1616. The remainder of the plates was prepared by Bucretius. The complete set of plates is seen as the most important anatomical illustration of the post-Vesalian period, and among the finest produced in the seventeenth century. Since before 1600 Casserius had been working on a fully-illustrated anatomical treatise, which he hired Fialetti to illustrate. His "De Vocis" of 1601 concludes with a promise to publish a treatise on the anatomy of the whole human body with illustrations. However, at the time of his early death in 1616 Casserio left 86 spectacular anatomical drawings by Fialetti, and also possibly their engravings, but no text. Casserius and the co-author of this work, Adrian van der Spiegel, both studied under Fabricius ab Aquapendente (Fabrici) at the University of Padua. Both worked closely with their teacher for many years, and in 1608 Casserius succeeded Fabrici in Padua's chair of surgery and anatomy, which passed in turn to Spiegel upon Casserius' death in 1616. Spiegel (Spigelius) (1578-1625) wrote an unillustrated treatise on anatomy that remained unpublished during his lifetime; in his will he appointed Daniel Bucretius (ne Rindfleisch) to see the work into print. To illustrate Spiegel's treatise, Bucretius obtained 77 of Fialetti's original 86 anatomical plates from the heirs of Casserius (probably engraved by J. Maurer), and commissioned 20 more by Fialetti and engraved by Valesio to complete the series (the remaining 9 plates left by Casserius were used to illustrate Spiegel's De Formato Foetu [1626]), which are part of this work. In the complete series, the largest number of plates, forty-three - and these perhaps the most memorable - are to be found in Liber IV, on the muscles. There are also interesting illustrations on the genito-urinary system in Liber VIII and on the brain in Liber X-one of these, showing the arterial circle at the brain, predates the Willis-Wren illustration [from Willis's Cerebri Anatome (1664)]. Except for those few plates which were derived from Vesalius, the anatomists had reconsidered ways of presenting human anatomy. In doing so they produced the first original series of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body since Vesalius. *Ref: Roberts & Tomlinson: The Fabric of the Body, pp. 262-63; see also pp. 259-61; Cazort, Kornell, Roberts: The Ingenious Machine of Nature: Four Centuries of Art and Anatomy (1996) pp. 167-68; Choulant-Frank 225; Garrison-Morton 381; Heirs of Hippocrates 414; NLM/Krivatsy 2202; 11297 (citing Casserio's and Spiegel's works separately); Sappol, Dream Anatomy pp. 110-111, 113; Waller 9121 and 1812.Artists and Engravers: Authors: Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius (1578-1625) was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city. He became professor of Anatomy in 1615, succeeding J. Casserius. At Padua he studied anatomy under Girolamo Fabrizio (1537-1619) and Julius Casserius (Giulio Casseri: 1552?1616). His best written work on anatomy is

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
 46.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Außerlesene Andächtige Catholische Gebett. Zu der heyligisten Dreyfaltigkeit, Gott Vatter, Sohn und H. Geist. 2. Sonderbare Gebett zu Christo Jesu. Item, von seinem bittern Leyden und Sterben. 3. Bey der H. Meß ... 4. Zu Maria der Mutter Gottes, vnd etlichen Heiligen. 5. Sondere Gebett, Für allerley Anligen deß Menschens. 6. Die siben Bußpsalmen ...

      München: durch Nicolaum Henricum, 1645. With 25 engraved plates, numerous woodcut images in text. Text printed within printed floral borders. [iv], 626, [11, table of contents] pp. 1 vols. Small 8vo. Contemporary dark morocco over wooden boards, elaborately gilt to panel design, edges gauffered and gilt. Rubbed, fore-edge clasps perished. Some occasional light foxing, small traces of worming in gutter at foot, paper flaw in first plate. very good. Handsome volume. With 25 engraved plates, numerous woodcut images in text. Text printed within printed floral borders. [iv], 626, [11, table of contents] pp. 1 vols. Small 8vo. Mid-seventeenth century printing of this standard Catholic devotional (OCLC records three editions from the first decades of the century), this copy handsomely bound and with engraved portraits of martyrs and saints and other religious images. Not in OCLC

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
 47.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Außerlesene Andächtige Catholische Gebett. Zu der heyligisten Dreyfaltigkeit, Gott Vatter, Sohn und H. Geist. 2. Sonderbare Gebett zu Christo Jesu. Item, von seinem bittern Leyden und Sterben. 3. Bey der H. Meß … 4. Zu Maria der Mutter Gottes, vnd etlichen Heiligen. 5. Sondere Gebett, Für allerley Anligen deß Menschens. 6. Die siben Bußpsalmen …

      München: durch Nicolaum Henricum, 1645. With 25 engraved plates, numerous woodcut images in text. Text printed within printed floral borders. [iv], 626, [11, table of contents] pp. 1 vols. Small 8vo. Contemporary dark morocco over wooden boards, elaborately gilt to panel design, edges gauffered and gilt. Rubbed, fore-edge clasps perished. Some occasional light foxing, small traces of worming in gutter at foot, paper flaw in first plate. very good. Handsome volume. With 25 engraved plates, numerous woodcut images in text. Text printed within printed floral borders. [iv], 626, [11, table of contents] pp. 1 vols. Small 8vo. Mid-seventeenth century printing of this standard Catholic devotional (OCLC records three editions from the first decades of the century), this copy handsomely bound and with engraved portraits of martyrs and saints and other religious images. Not in OCLC

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
 48.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  

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