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         Il Decamerone.

      (Al verso del f. CCCLII:) Impresso in Vinegia per Gregorio de Gregori il mese di Maggio dell'anno MDXVI (Venezia, Gregorio de Gregori, 1516). in-4 (mm 186x120), ff. (2), CCCLII, (10, ultimo bianco), raffinata legatura di fine XVIII secolo in marocchino granata a grana larga, filetto oro ai piatti, dorso liscio con filetti e titolo in oro. Precede il testo dedica del Dofino "Alle gentil et valorose donne"; in fine Errata e Tavola dell'opera. Prima edizione in formato in-4 e prima a cura del Dolfino, che ebbe il merito di riordinare e presentare l'opera boccaccesca nella sua integrità: "Niccolò Dolfino, cui deesi questa rara e bella edizione, ebbe veramente il merito di fare i primi passi per ridonare al Decamerone la sua integrità; per lo che questa ed. salì in molta fama" (Gamba 169). Edizione assai stimata dal punto di vista filologico, è ricercata anche per la sua rarità (censita in sole 8 Biblioteche pubbliche italiane); "...oggi di una sicura rarità. E' la prima edizione che uscisse nel formato di quarto, e la prima in cui si cercasse di ridurre il Decameron alla sua integrità", Bacchi della Lega, 34). Ottimo esemplare, a grandi margini, di illustre provenienza: nota di possesso ms. sul primo e ultimo foglio di Sir. Christopher Hutton; nota sulla sguardia anteriore: "a copy of this edition of the Decamerone sold at Col. Stanley's Sale of Books in may 1813 for £ 63.0.0" (tracce di polvere al titolo; lievi aloni d'umido nel margine superiore degli ultimi ff.). Edizione preziosa.. Borromeo p. 7 e V: ''...primo comparve alla luce il più corretto degli altri''. Zambrini 37. Mostre Certaldo n. 48. Olschki n. 3 (questo esemplare).

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Pregliasco]
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         Le Jardin de contemplation

      (colophon:) Paris: Jean Petit, 1516. 8vo (134 x 90 mm). Collation: a-z8 et8 A-D8. [224] leaves, including final blank. Batarde types, 27 lines. Publisher's woodcut device on title (not in Renouard), 8- and 4-line metalcut initials. Colophon printed in a cruciform X-shape. Title and last leaf stained, occasional small stains elsewhere, minor worming in lower margins, not affecting text. 18th-century mottled calf, smooth spine gold-tooled with allover floral decor, edges stained red (joints split, quite worn). Provenance: flourished contemporary signature at end (De cannes?); traces of deleted annotations in lower margins of first quire and on final blank leaf; 12 [symbol for livres tournois], 3940, early purchase note in red ink on verso of front free endpaper; Louis-César de la Baume de Blanc, Duc de La Vallière: 18th-century pencil number "759" on front flyleaf = Guillaume François de Bure, Catalogue des livres provenans de la bibliotheque de M.L.D.D.L.V. [Monsieur le Duc de La Vallière], Paris 1767, lot 759; Lambert, former Lieutenant-Colonel des Dragons, sale Paris: De Bure, 14 February 1780, lot 136. *** only edition of an allegorical tale for nuns. According to the publisher's brief introduction (a2r), and to a preliminary letter from the Mother Superior herself, the work was composed at the request of the Abbess of the convent of the Clarisses (Poor Clares) of Aigueperse (founded in 1422, and until the Revolution one of the largest convents in Auvergne). Speaking for all the sisters, the Abbess begs Henry to fulfill his "large promesse" of books of religious instruction for the convent. Jean or Jehan Henry (whose name is given in the incipit) was the author of a handful of devotional works, all published posthumously, mainly by the printer-publisher Jean Petit in or around 1516. From a family of Norman petits nobles, Henry became royal councillor in 1463 and served as President of the Chambre des enquetes (Chamber of Inquiries) of Parliament. From 1468 he also served as canon and cantor of Notre-Dame in Paris. Henry wrote all of his works for a feminine audience, mainly for female religious communities (cf. Berriot-Salvadore), and most were cast as allegorical meditations, as here (cf. Boulton and Hasenohr). His books were acts of piety and apparently self-financed. The four-part treatise, whose principal theme is the definition of the contemplative life, and its possible reconciliation with the vie active, is couched as an allegorical vision experienced by the author after receiving the Abbess's pleas. The dream / allegory features a mystical garden of contemplation, with at center the Tree of the Cross. The author's initial vision appears in the form of a female figure "of very small stature and simple bearing, whose gaze was directed heavenwards, who wore a robe of little color and of poor material, and a black veil and light shawl like a shroud"; he realizes that she is not his usual dreamtime companion, Dame Sollicitude (Lady Worldly Care), who is "of tall stature, light bearing, vague regard, [and] pompous attire of many colors" (ff. b1v-b2r), and he later learns that the mysterious lady is Humility. She narrates Part I, in which humility is presented as the necessary foundation for Faith. Part II is introduced by Faith herself, who explains to the author the meaning of the Tree of the Cross. She is soon joined by a host of other allegorical personnages: Prudence, Office [worldly duties], Contemplation, Charity, Pity, Peace, and so on, each arguing her own point of view; the contemplative life is concluded to be superior to the active life. Along the way are imparted histories of the first anachorites and of the origins of convent life, and it is explained that the Minorite female communities sought to emulate those first hermits and monks. In a chapter on Elizabeth of Hungary (gg8v-h2r), the establishment of hospitals is presented as a paradigm of charity, embodying Henry's values. In Part III the author, and by extension the reader, by means of her devotional practices, are guided into the garden. The allegorical thread is sustained throughout this exposition of the path to divine understanding, attainable through contemplation of the mysteries of the Passion and of the Seven Words of Christ. In the brief fourth part author and reader attain the top of the Tree of the Cross. Significantly, the work concludes with the recognition, by Prudence, that the contemplative life and an active life in the world are not mutually exclusive. The Jardin de Contemplation, of which at least one manuscript is known (BnF Département des manuscrits, Fr. 997, digitized on Gallica), has been viewed as the first of a series of fictions incorporating gardens as the structuring principle (Huë); as part of a surge, in the late fifteenth century, of devotional works written for cloistered women (Boulton and Hasenohr, p. 34); and as representative of the late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century vogue for spiritual allegory, linking this type of treatise to morality plays (Hasonohr, p. 44: in Henry's works, "all the instruction is set forth `by personnages [characters]', and the author, who presents himself as the `pilgrim' or the `actor' [as here] directs the action" [trans.]). The printer / bookseller Jean I Petit was active from ca. 1492 to ca. 1540. The woodcut device used on the title resembles Renouard 883 and features the same whimsical lion and a leopard-like creature holding aloft a shield with the IP monogram, in front of trees with birds and flanking putti, but is printed from a different block, unknown (unusually) to Renouard. Other printing oddities of the book are the calligrammatic colophon, and an upper-case A that is printed before the signature in the signature line of the first recto of each quire. This recalls the abbreviations of usage in the signature lines of French printed books of hours, and may have been a way of distinguishing this edition from the four other tracts by Henry published by Jean Petit at about the same time (3 are undated but attributed to 1516, cf. Moreau II 1374-1377); this would imply that the five editions were printed concurrently. Like all of Henry's books, this one is rare: OCLC, USTC and the sources cited below locate four copies in French libraries, of which two are imperfect. The present humble copy belonged to one of the greatest French book collectors, and among the greatest anywhere, "the paragon of the French bibliophile" (Coq), the Duc de La Vallière (1708-1780). The Duke bought and sold constantly, improving his collections; many of his books were sold as duplicates during his lifetime, usually through his bookseller de choix, Guillaume de Bure. The first of his large dispersals at auction was the 1767 sale by De Bure. In two volumes, it included many rarities, not least a copy (on paper) of the 1462 Fust and Schoeffer Bible (GW 4204), which brought the highest price in the sale. It should be noted that "in contrast to so many other bibliophiles, La Vallière only rarely marked his books with signs of personal possession ... It was as if he was content to have these books as part of his collection, even if it was only a matter of momentary possession" (Coq, p. 323, trans). Thus the faint pencil inscription of a lot number is in many cases the sole internal piece of evidence that a book passed through his hands. (The present binding, although already on the book at the time of the 1767 sale, was not the work of one of La Vallière's customary binders.) References: Moreau II:1373; Bechtel, Gothiques H-19 (incorrect collation); Higman, Piety and the People, H3; Brunet III:102. Cf. Dictionnaire de Spiritualité vol. 7 (1968), 259-263; Maureen Barry McCann Boulton, Sacred Fictions of Medieval France: Narrative Theology in the Lives of Christ and the Virgin, 1150-1500 (2015), p. 182; Denis Huë, "Reliure, clôture, culture : le contenu des jardins," Vergers et jardins dans l'univers médiéval, Aix-en-Provence, 1990, note 19; Geneviève Hasenohr, "Aspects de la Littérature de Spiritualité en Langue Française," Revue d'histoire de l'Église de France, vol. 77, no. 198, 1991, pp. 29-45; Evelyne Berriot-Salvadore, Les femmes dans la société française de la Renaissance (1990), pp. 289-90; Thomas Frank, Heilsame Wortgefechte: Reformen europäischer Hospitaler vom 14. bis 16. Jahrhundert (2014), chapter III.2, "Das Hotel-Dieu und andere Pariser Hospitäler im 15. Jahrhundert," pp. 157-158; Dominique Coq, "Le duc de la Vallière et sa collection," Histoire des bibliothèques françaises: les bibliothèques sous l'Ancien Régime 1530-1789, Paris: Promodis, 1968, pp. 316-331; Richard C. Christie, "The Catalogues of the Library of the Duc de la Valliere," The Library Chronicle, vol. II, London 1885, pp. 153-159.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
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         Q.Horatii Flacci Opera cum Commentariis Ode Quidem

      Badium Ascensium, Parisiis 1516 - 1 vol cm 27.5 –cc.4n.n.,cc.CXXX(130) + LXXXIII(83) , mezza pergamena sec XVII, bel frontis architettonico figurato, caratteri romani e gotici, vari capilettera piccoli e grandi a "fondo crible", lievi aloni inizio e fine, foro di tarlo alla cerniera ma esemplare bello e marginoso, terza e più corretta edizione, foglio 76 sostituito con elegante copia manoscritta coeva. 1 volume 27.5 cm, cc.4n.n., cc. CXXX (130) + LXXXIII (83), half parchment binding XVII century, nice figurative frontispiece, roman and gothic types, various small and large initial letters, light halos at beginning and end, wormhole to the joint but nice copy with wide margins, third more correct edition, sheet 76 replaced with elegant handwritten copy. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Redaelli Alberto]
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         Silve celebratissimam Francisci magni Valesii in Helvetios Victoriam cantatissima Caroli octavi et lodovici duodecimi prelia (quibus bellacissimus Iacobus chabannus eques auratus Franciae Marescalus fortiter ac triumphantissime interfuerit) necnon strenuissimi equitis aurati comensis prefecti et religiosissimi aniciensis ecclesiae antistitis preconia complexae.

      In Parrhisiorum Lutetia, apud Egidium Gormontium, 1516. - Petit in-8. 124ff. non chiffrés. Plein veau, dos lisse orné (reliure postérieure restaurée). Edition Originale. Rarissime recueil de poésies néo-latines célébrant les victoires de François Ier en Italie. "Ces poésies ne sont pas sans mérite, et elles ont même un certain intérêt historique. Outre les pièces indiquées sur le titre, le volume en contient d'autres, soit de Hugues d'Ambert, soit de quelques poètes contemporains. Parmi les pièces préliminaires est une lettre de Jean de Ville à Jacques de Chabannes, datée de Paris, 5° Idus Octobres, 1516, dans laquelle il a fait un grand éloge de ce général" (Brunet). François Ier possédait un exemplaire de cet ouvrage, relié à ses armes. Petit travail de ver marginal à quelques feuillets, sans atteinte au texte. Très bon exemplaire. Graesse, III, p. 386. Brunet, III, p. 366. Pas dans Adams. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librería Comellas]
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         Beatiss. Patris Nili, episcopi et martyris theologi antiquiss, sente[n]tiae morales e graeco in latinu[m] versae.

      Nurembergae: Fridericus Peypus, [1516]. 4to (20.3 cm; 8"). [10] ff. First edition of Saint Nilus of Sinai's Sententiae morales as translated by Willibald Pirckheimer from the Greek to Latin. Both talented men were great supporters of others in their lifetimes, Nilus being "a leading ascetical writer of the 5th century" while defending St. John Chrysostom, and German humanist Pirckheimer (1470–1530) befriending both the illustrator Albrecht Durer and the theologian Erasmus (Holweck, Biographical Dictionary of the Saints, p. 745). At the end here, on the final two leaves, is a sermon of St. John of Damascus, "Ex Sanctiss, Patriss [sic] Ioannis Damasceni sermonibvs."    A woodcut border cut in reverse (i.e., the background is black and the figures are white) with Pirckheimer's coat of arms and Grecian decoration, originally attributed to Durer but now attributed to Durer's pupil Hans Springinklee (ca. 1490/ 1495 – ca. 1540), adorns the title-page; the border was first used in Plutarchi Chaeronei de his qui tarde a numine corripintur libellus (1513).    Evidence of Readership: Words and phrases of text have been underlined in early ink, with one word added marginally.    Provenance: Illustrated bookplate of 20th-century German book collector Ida Schoeller on front pastedown; later in the library of American collector Albert A. Howard, small booklabel ("AHA") at rear. A pre-WWII German bookseller's description has been pasted on the rear pastedown.         VD16 N1760. On the title-page, see: Dodgson, German and Flemish Woodcuts, I, p. 379. Modern boards covered in an incunable leaf, light glue action to endpapers; small interior tear (or short slim wormtrack) to title-page and its top edge closely trimmed affecting edge of woodcut border. Readership/provenance markings as above, moderate age-toning and foxing with a few marginal spots/stains. => A good copy of an apparently unusual little work.

      [Bookseller: Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co]
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         Heures a lusaige de Rome tout au long sans riens requerir nouvellement imprimees a Paris pour Germain Hardouyn demourant entre les deux portes du palays a lenseigne Saincte Marguerite

      Paris: Germain Hardouyin, 1516 16mo (107x68 mm); handsome early 18th-century French brown morocco à la dentelle, spine with four small raised bands, compartments richly gilt-tooled, marbled endpapers in comb pattern, housed in modern black morocco case; (96) leaves. Collation: A-M8. Gothic type, text in Latin, title and colophon in French (Les presentes heures a lusaige de Rome tout au long sans riens requerir ont este nouvellement imprimees a Paris pour Germain Hardouyn libraire demourant audit lieu entre les deux portes du Palays a lenseigne saincte Marguerite). With 15 large hand-painted woodcuts (ll. A1r, B2r, B5r, C7v, d5r, E3r, E4r, E5r, E8r, F3r, F6r, G1r, G5v, i1r, K2v), three-line initials in gold, on grounds of blue and dark pink, numerous one and two-line initials in gold on alternating dark pink and blue ground, rubricated in dark pink and blue. Overall an excellent copy, browned and stained in places, quire 'd' slightly loose, some illuminated initials slightly discolored.AN EXCESSIVELY RARE EARLY FRENCH EDITION of the book of hours, printed on vellum and datable, from the almanac printed at the beginning, to 1516. The volume was issued from the press of the leading Parisian publisher and illuminator Germain Hardouyn, active from ca. 1500/1505 to 1539/1541.Between the end of the fifteenth century and the early sixteenth century Paris was the principal center of production and trade for printed Books of Hours, which from a textual point of view followed the manuscript examples. Germain Hardouyn, together with his brother Gilles, printed almost exclusively Books of Hours, producing at least two or three editions per year (J. Guignard, Livres d'Heures de Germain Hardouyn à la Bibliothèque Nationale, Les trésors des bibliothèques de France, VII, 1942, pp. 30-42).For special clients Hardouyn produced handsome presentation copies of the Heures, printed on vellum and decorated with illuminations, like the copy offered here. It closely resembles an illuminated manuscript: it is printed on vellum in gothic type, with colophon but no title-page, illustrated with illuminated woodcuts, and decorated with numerous hand painted initials and line endings. He continued to produce illuminated copies of Hours even after other Parisian publishers had abandoned this production.In the present copy the first miniature shows St. Cecilia playing a lute, a feature which suggests that this precious copy on vellum was not a standardized one, but rather individually designed. Patrons could in fact request the inclusion of favorite or local saints, and this was particularly the case in books commissioned by distinguished women.Text: The edition includes all standard textual elements of Hours. It opens with the almanac, for the years 1516-1537; the other sections follow: extracts from the gospels, the Passion according to John, office of the virgin, Seven Penitential Psalms, Litanies, offices of the Dead, supplemented with short offices and Suffrages.Illumination: The text is accompanied by fifteen handsome illuminated woodcuts at the beginning of sections, and mostly depicting scenes from the life of the virgin Mary, derived in all likelihood from images previously used in other manuscripts or printed Books of Hours. The illumination was probably executed in Hardouyn's workshop. The leaves containing illuminated woodcuts are framed in gold-painted architectonic borders 'à l'antique', sketched in red on a gold yellow ground, and decorated with Hardouyn's characteristic dangling cords and tassels. The woodcuts are colored in the new quicker style with the lines of the cut largely obscured by paint, and only in a few areas do the underlying designs show through.fol. A1r: St. Ceciliafol. B2r: John the evangelist writingfol. B5r: Christ carrying the crossfol. c7v: Annunciationfol. D5r: visitationfol. e3r: Christ carrying the cross (in a different version)fol. e4r: Marriage of the virgine5r: Nativitye8r: Annunciation to the ShepherdsF3r: Adoration of the MagiF6r: Presentation in the Templeg1r: Flight into Egyptg5v: coronation of the virginI1r: King DavidK2v: Job on the DungheapH. Bohatta, Bibliographie der Livres d'heures des XV. und XVI. Jahrhunderts, Vienna, 1909, p. 34, no. 912.

      [Bookseller: Govi Rare Books LLC]
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         Vita philosophorum et poetarum; cum auctoritatibus et sententiis aureis eorundem annexis.

      Strassburg, Johann Knobloch d. Ä., 1516. - 4°, circa 20,2 x 14,4 cm. 8 ff., LII pp. 17th century decorated red leather with richly gilded covers (restored, rebacked) "VD16 B 9848; Schmidt, Rep. VII, 115. Rare Strasbourg edition, introduced by a "Carmen tumultuarium" on the title. The "De vita ac moribus philosophorum" is considered to be the "first attempt in modern times at writing a history of ancient philosophy" (Sandys). It starts with Thales and characterizes many ancient philosophers up to the times of Seneca. Walter Burley (1275-1345?) was teaching at Paris and Oxford and opposed the views of his contemporary William of Ockham. For the present work his sources were Diogenes Laertius, Vincent of Beauvais and others. Its elegant style and entertaining way of presenting the personal lives of eminent philosophers and their theories made it a favorite book in the later Middle Ages up to the Renaissance. This edition starts with twelve pages of index listing first the names of the philosophers and then enumerating sentences and authorities. - Minor browning, little spotting, mostly fine. Few old annotations ("barba decet virum", "homines bestias vocavit" etc.). The pretty binding is rebacked, the laces are gone, edges restored, endpapers well renewed, still quite pretty. " [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Thomas Rezek]
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         Epithome commentariorum Galeni in libros Hippocratis - Index eorum omniumque in hac arte parva Galeni pertractantur - Medicinale bellorum inter Galenum & Aristotelem gestum - Cathegorie medicinales

      Lyon, Jean Marion 1516 - Lyon, Jean Marion, 23 juin 1516. Petit in-4 de 4 parties en 1 volume de I. (12), 104 et (4) feuillets ; II. (16), 63 et (1) feuillets ; III. (24) feuillets ; et IV. (40) feuillets [dont le dernier blanc]. Vélin moderne, dos orné d’une pièce de titre, tranches bleues ciselées de l’époque. Le premier médecin français humaniste et érudit du XVIe siècle. Editions originales rares de ces quatre commentaires sur Galien par Symphorien Champier (1471-1539), tous imprimés à Lyon en 1516 chez Jean Marion pour Jean Simon. Médecin humaniste lyonnais, Champier est aujourd’hui plus connu des bibliophiles français pour son histoire de Lyon, ses chroniques et la biographie de son cousin le chevalier Bayard. Néanmoins, Champier fut à son époque surtout célèbre pour son activité de médecin humaniste. Son rôle d’éditeur, commentateur et praticien, durant la première Renaissance en France, fut important et influent. “Champier was born in a small village near Lyons and studied at the University of Paris. He entered the medical school at Montpellier in 1495 and his letters indicate that he was practicing medicine and teaching liberal arts within a year after matriculating. He returned to complete his degree in 1503. During his career, he engaged in the active practice of medicine and was a major figure in Lyons’Renaissance [.]” (Heirs of Hippocrates 167). En 1506, il publia chez Campis à Lyon, son De medicine claris scriptoribus in quinque partibus tractatus qui est aujourd’hui considéré comme le premier livre d’histoire de la médecine des temps modernes (voir Garrison/Morton 6376 et 6742.99). Les quatre œuvres ici réunies forment une synthèse des travaux humanistes de médecine et des idées médicales de Champier. La première partie, l’Epithome, constitue une nouvelle édition des classiques commentaires de Galien sur quatre œuvres d’Hippocrate : les Aphorismes, les Pronostiques, le Régime en cas de maladie aiguë et les Epidémies. Pour la seconde partie, Champier commente certains passages de l’Ars Parva de Galien d’après la traduction latine de Lorenzo Laurenziani en y ajoutant ses propres commentaires tirés des exégèses italiennes des XIVe et XVe siècles. Enfin, dans la quatrième partie, la plus personnelle, sur la pharmacologie et la botanique médicale, Champier développe une théorie personnelle sur l’emploi des médicaments simples en thérapeutique. « Champier made worthwhile contributions to the therapeutics of his day by severely criticizing apothecaries for many of their practices. He staunchly opposed alchemy and spoke out strongly against the use of polypharmaceutics because of their toxicity. It was believed that the potency of compound mixtures increased in direct proportion to the number of their ingredients. Champier was convinced that botanical simples were by far the best remedies available. In this treatise, he has drawn from Galen’s many pharmacological works, as well as those of Aristotle, to present a commentary on the various categories of medicines. Marginal references to the ideas of Haly Abbas, Averroës, and Avicenna are frequent. » (Heirs of Hippocrates 169). Vis-à-vis de la page de titre des Medicinale bellorum, intéressantes notes de l’époque sur l’interprétation politique et juridique des épidémies, avec renvois aux sources : Canond’Avicenne (Dieu est le juge, le médecin est l’avocat), le Methodus de Léonard Fuchs et l’Artificium de applicatione astrologiae Medicinam de Georgius Colimitus (Georg Tanstetter). Rarissime mise en recueil d’éditions de Galien et d’œuvres personnelles d’un des premiers médecins humanistes français du XVIe siècle. Divers ex-libris et notes manuscrites du XVIIIe siècle sur les feuillets de garde. Mouillure marginale ayant nécessité une restauration aux feuillets 53 à 92, quelques salissures, toutefois bon exemplaire qui réunit ces quatre ouvrages depuis leur impression comme l’atteste les tranches bleues ciselées d’origine, et ses feuillets de garde annotés à l’époque. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Le Zograscope]
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         The New Review. Consecutive run of 19 semi-monthly issues, Vol. III no 5 to Vol. IV no 2 (May 1 1915 to Jan 15, 1916)

      New York: The New Review, 1915-16. First Edition. A substantial, consecutive run of issues, covering most of the year 1915. An independent radical bi-monthly, The New Review claimed a distinguished board of editors, including most of the writers who would go on to found The Masses in 1916. Indeed, Goldwater says of The New Review: "...it was considered to have been absorbed into the Masses ... whose masthead for August to November, 1916, included its name." Unlike the Masses, however, New Review was primarily a news magazine devoted to developments in the growing international Socialist movement; it included no illustrations and comparatively little literary work. Contributors to the this run of issues include Louis Fraina, Elsie Clews Parsons, John Spargo, Floyd Dell, Ernest Boyd, Mary White Ovington, William English Walling, Harry Laidler, and a host of others. Not entirely uncommon, but seldom encountered in cohesive runs and rarely found in nice condition. GOLDWATER 185. Nineteen consecutive quarto issues in original wrappers. Staple-bound self-wraps; 24pp per issue. Mild toning and soil to outer pages on some issues; occasional mild creasing, but no serious wear - generally Very Good or better overall.

      [Bookseller: Lorne Bair Rare Books ]
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         Opera omnia quae reperiri potuerunt: ex antiquis exemplaribus diligentia & labore Mariani Victorii Reatini, emendata, atque argumentis & scholiis illustrata. Quibus supra ceteras editiones adiecimus Theophili Alexandrini Epistolas tres, quae vulgo Paschales appelantur, ab eodem Hieronymo in lat. sermonem conversas [...]. Adiecta est [...] vita D. Hieronymi [...] quam idem Marianus [...] collectam primus editit. Indices locupletißimi [...]. 9 in 5 Bänden.

      Fol. (39 x 27 cm). Mit 9 (wiederh.) Holzschn.-Druckermarken a. d. Titeln u. zahlr. Holzschn.-Vignetten u. -Initialen im Text. Ldr.-Bde. d. Zt. a. 6 Bünden m. goldgepr. Deckelfileten, Rückenverg. u. goldgepr. Rückentiteln. Nachdruck der im selben Jahr bei Plantin in Antwerpen erschienenen Ausgabe. Die Werke des Kirchenvaters wurden erstmals 1516 von Erasmus gesammelt und herausgegeben. Eine katholische Redaktion des Textes erstellte dann M. Victorius 1565-1572. Dieser Ausgabe folgt die vorliegende: Cette édition a été faite sur plus vingt mss. et proprement alle est opposée à celle d'Erasme qui est accusé d'avoir corrompu ou non compris quinze cent passages (Graesse). - Der Kirchenvater Hieronymus (347-420) gehört in der katholischen Kirche zusammen mit Ambrosius von Mailand, Augustinus und Papst Gregor I. zu den vier spätantiken Kirchenlehrern des Abendlandes. Hieronymus ist der Verfasser der Vulgata, der lange Zeit maßgeblichen Bibelübersetzung der katholischen Kirche. Er übersetzte in ein Latein, das er behutsam dem Sprechlatein seiner Zeit annäherte. Für das Neue Testament überarbeitete er die ältere Übersetzung Vetus Latina (früher auch Itala genannt). - Die dekorativen Einbände beschabt u. an den Rücken u. Kanten fachm. restauriert. Schwach gebräunt bzw. stockfleckig. Ein Band im Kopfsteg schwach wasserrandig. Wenige Bll. mit Knickspuren. - Insgesamt dekoratives, sauberes Exemplar. - Vgl. Brunet III, 156 Graesse III, 273 u. BM STC, French Books 240 nicht bei Adams.

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         Gedrucktes Mandat mit Vollziehungsstempel und eigenh. Vollziehungsstrich ("se"): Verbot, in französische Kriegsdienste zu treten.

      Augsburg, 16. I. 1516. - Einblattdruck. 1 S. Qu.-Folio (560 x 400 mm). Mit papiergedecktem Siegel über rotem Wachs (weitgehend verloren). Gefaltet. Mandat, "das nyemannd aus dem hailigen Reich unnd sonnderlich Teutscher nacion weder zu Ross noch fuess, dem künig von Franckreich als unnserm und des Reichs offenbaren veinde zu diennst zuziehen" erlaubt sein solle, "sonnder wo dieselben so also des willenns weren, erfarn, angegriffen, und an irem leib gestrafft, auch der die darüber bey Franckreich beleiben, hab und gueter, als verwürckt und haimgefallen, eingezogen werden sollen [.]". - Kaiser Maximilians geschickte Heiratspolitik hatte das Haus Habsburg mit Spanien alliiert; aus der daraus entstehenden Einklammerung Frankreichs erwuchs der zweieinhalb Jahrhunderte währende sog. habsburgisch-französische Gegensatz, der erst mit Kaunitz' "Renversement des Alliances" ausklingen sollte. Das vorliegende Mandat geht dem Tod Ferdinands II. von Aragón und dem darauf folgenden Thronantritt von Maximilians Sohn Karl (als Carlos I., später Kaiser Karl V.) um eben eine Woche voraus. - Mit gedr. Handzeichen des Kaisers und einer gedr. Gegenzeichnung von Kanzler Cyprian von Serenthein. Kl. Fraßspur (etwas Papierverlust im Text). Verso von zeitgenöss. Hand bezeichnet: "Mandata das niemant in Franckreich zu roß oder fuß ziehenn soll".

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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         Historia naturale di Caio Plinio Secondo di lingua latina in fiorentina tradocta per il doctissimo homo miser Christophero Landino fiorentino novamente correcta: da infiniti errori purgada: Aggionte etiam di novo le figure a tutti li libri convenient

      Marchio Sessa e Piero di Ravani Bersano, Venetia 1516 - In Folio (mm 320x215); carte non num. 14, carte num. 259. Testo su due colonne completo, tre errori di numerazione delle carte, (carta XCIV malnumerata XCV, carta XCVII malnumerata XCXVII, cartaCXCVI malnumerata CXCVIII). Frontespizio in rosso e nero, testo su due colonne, marca editoriale di Sessa in silogr. raffigurante la celebre gatta col topo in bocca, altra marca incisa in legno con il mondo e croce entro riquadro in nero alla fine del "Repertorio" alla bb7 verso. 38 illustrazioni silografiche (alla bb8 recto inscrizione della tomba dei familiari di Plinio) e 37 grandi e raffinate iniziali ornate con motivi fitomorfi, racemi, animali e putti, poste all'inizio dei libri, oltre a centinaia di piccole iniziali. Piena pergamena settecentesca con titolo manoscritto a inchiostro bruno al dorso, tagli marezzati.Prima edizione italiana illustrata della pi? antica opera enciclopedico-scientifica pervenutaci dall'antichit?, che influenzÚ la conoscenza dell'umanit? fino al medioevo ed una delle pi? importanti produzioni uscite dai torchi dello stampatore veneziano. L'opera Ë una vera enciclopedia della conoscenza si occupa infatti di matematica, fisica, cosmografia, zoologia, agricoltura, botanica, mineralogia, metallurgia, geografia, antropologia, fisiologia, storia dell'arte, antropologia. Uno dei primi testi della scolastica in lingua volgare curato da Cristoforo Landino (prima editata nel 1476).Le raffinate incisioni (commissionate dai Sessa) appositamente realizzate per l'edizione latina del 1513, la prima figurata, impressa dai medesimi stampatori, qui sono riutilizzate, a parte una incisione all'inizio del libro IX, degli animali acquatici; il resto dell'apparato iconografico rappresenta: due piccole carte geografiche di Europa ed Africa, l'universo tolemaico, scene di cannibalismo, scene di agricoltura (viticoltura fra le altre), pazienti curati con le erbe, speziali mentre preparano medicine, apicoltori medievali al lavoro, bagni minerali, artisti all'opera, animali (elefanti, giraffe, mostri marini) ecc. Bell'esemplare con chiose al margine di alcune carte, macchie brune alla carta LXXXI, CLXXIX, CLXXX; piccoli fori di tarlo persistenti nel volume dalla carta LXXXVIII alla fine.Ex libris manoscritto cassato al frontespizio, qualche lieve alone nella parte superiore, minime saltuarie macchie e aloni marginali. Manca la carta bianca finale. Essling, I/1, S. 31, N. 5. British Library HMNTS 729. K. 34; Mortimer 38 scienze, storia naturale, medicina.

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         Martyrilogium viola sanctorumandnbsp

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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         Historia naturale di Caio Plinio Secondo di lingua latina in fiorentina tradocta per il doctissimo homo miser Christophero Landino fiorentino novamente correcta: da infiniti errori purgada: Aggionte etiam di novo le figure a tutti li libri convenient

      Marchio Sessa e Piero di Ravani Bersano, 1516. In Folio (mm 320x215); carte non num. 14, carte num. 259. Testo su due colonne completo, tre errori di numerazione delle carte, (carta XCIV malnumerata XCV, carta XCVII malnumerata XCXVII, cartaCXCVI malnumerata CXCVIII). Frontespizio in rosso e nero, testo su due colonne, marca editoriale di Sessa in silogr. raffigurante la celebre gatta col topo in bocca, altra marca incisa in legno con il mondo e croce entro riquadro in nero alla fine del "Repertorio" alla bb7 verso. 38 illustrazioni silografiche (alla bb8 recto inscrizione della tomba dei familiari di Plinio) e 37 grandi e raffinate iniziali ornate con motivi fitomorfi, racemi, animali e putti, poste all'inizio dei libri, oltre a centinaia di piccole iniziali. Piena pergamena settecentesca con titolo manoscritto a inchiostro bruno al dorso, tagli marezzati.Prima edizione italiana illustrata della più antica opera enciclopedico-scientifica pervenutaci dall'antichità, che influenzò la conoscenza dell'umanità fino al medioevo ed una delle più importanti produzioni uscite dai torchi dello stampatore veneziano. L'opera è una vera enciclopedia della conoscenza si occupa infatti di matematica, fisica, cosmografia, zoologia, agricoltura, botanica, mineralogia, metallurgia, geografia, antropologia, fisiologia, storia dell'arte, antropologia. Uno dei primi testi della scolastica in lingua volgare curato da Cristoforo Landino (prima editata nel 1476).Le raffinate incisioni (commissionate dai Sessa) appositamente realizzate per l'edizione latina del 1513, la prima figurata, impressa dai medesimi stampatori, qui sono riutilizzate, a parte una incisione all'inizio del libro IX, degli animali acquatici; il resto dell'apparato iconografico rappresenta: due piccole carte geografiche di Europa ed Africa, l'universo tolemaico, scene di cannibalismo, scene di agricoltura (viticoltura fra le altre), pazienti curati con le erbe, speziali mentre preparano medicine, apicoltori medievali al lavoro, bagni minerali, artisti all'opera, animali (elefanti, giraffe, mostri marini) ecc. Bell'esemplare con chiose al margine di alcune carte, macchie brune alla carta LXXXI, CLXXIX, CLXXX; piccoli fori di tarlo persistenti nel volume dalla carta LXXXVIII alla fine.Ex libris manoscritto cassato al frontespizio, qualche lieve alone nella parte superiore, minime saltuarie macchie e aloni marginali. Manca la carta bianca finale. Essling, I/1, S. 31, N. 5. British Library HMNTS 729. K. 34; Mortimer 38

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         Die Ritterlich und lobwürdig reiß [.] Sagend von den landen, Egypto, Syria, von beiden Arabia Persia, India und Ethiopia, von den gestalten, sitten, und dero menschen leben und glauben.

      Strasbourg, Johann Knobloch, 1516. - 4to. 226 pp., final blank f. With title woodcut and 47 woodcuts in the text (including 1 full-page illustration). Blindstamped dark blue morocco by Riviere & Son with giltstamped spine title. All edges gilt. Marbled endpapers. The first illustrated edition (in its second issue) of one of the most famous early travel reports and the first western encounter with the Arab world. Of the utmost rarity; not a single copy could be traced on the market for the past sixty years; not a single copy in the USA (cf. OCLC). Lodovico de Varthema’s "Itinerario" describes the first recorded eyewitness account by a westerner of the holy cities of Mecca and Medina. All early editions of Varthema’s "Itinerario" are exceedingly rare (even the 2013 Hajj exhibition at the MIA, Doha, only featured the 1654 reprint; cf. below). This - the first illustrated one - is certainly the rarest of them all: international auction records list not a single copy. The 1510 editio princeps was offered for US$ 1 million at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair in April 2011. - Varthema, a gentleman adventurer and soldier from Bologna, left Venice at the end of 1502. In 1503 he reached Alexandria and ascended the Nile to Cairo, continuing to Beirut, Tripoli, Aleppo and Damascus, where, adopting Islam and taking the name of Yunas, he joined a Mameluke escort of a Hajj caravan and began the pilgrimage to Mecca. Varthema was amazed by what he observed: "Truly I never saw so many people collected in one spot as during the twenty days I remained there", he begins, and arriving at the Great Mosque, continues, "it would not be possible to describe the sweetness and the fragrances which are smelt within this temple." Thanks to his knowledge of Arabic and Islam, Varthema was able to appreciate the local culture of the places he visited. Impressed and fascinated, he describes not only rites and rituals, but also social, geographical, and day-to-day details. "I determined, personally, and with my own eyes", he declares in the prefatory dedication, "to ascertain the situation of places, the qualities of peoples [.] of Egypt, Syria, Arabia Deserta and Felix, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, remembering well that the testimony of one eye-witness is worth more than ten hear-says." His good fortune did not continue unabated, however: after embarking at Jeddah and sailing to Aden, he was denounced as a Christian spy and imprisoned. He secured his release and proceeded on an extensive tour of southwest Arabia. Stopping in Sanaa and Zebid as well as a number of smaller cities, he describes the people, the markets and trade, the kind of fruits and animals that are plentiful in the vicinity, and any historical or cultural information deemed noteworthy. Returning to Aden, and after a brief stop in Ethiopia, he set sail for India. In addition to visiting Persia, Varthema explored the coasts of Malabar and Coromandel, including a very documented stay at Calicut at the beginning of 1505. He also purports to have made extensive travels around the Malay peninsula and the Moluccas. Returning to Calicut in August 1505, he took employment with the Portuguese at Cochin and, in 1508, made his way back to Europe via the Cape of Good Hope. - First published in 1510, Varthema's account became an immediate bestseller. In addition to his fascinating account of Egypt, Syria, the Arabian Peninsula, and the holy Muslim cities, "Varthema brought into European literature an appreciation of the areas east of India [.] which it had previously not received from the sea-travelers and which confirmed by firsthand observations many of the statements made earlier by Marco Polo and the writers of antiquity" (Lach, I. i. 166). "Varthema was a real traveller. His reports on the social and political conditions of the various lands he visited are reliable as being gathered from personal contact with places and peoples. His account of the overland trade is of great value in that we are made to see it before it had begun to give [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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         Psalterium Hebreum, Grecu[m], Arabicu[m], & Chaldaicu[m], cu[m] tribus latinis i[n]terp[re]tat[ion]ibus & glossis.

      Genoa, Pietro Paulo Porro, 1516. - Folio (binding 250 x 335 mm, inner book 236 x 327 mm). 200 leaves, complete. Title printed in red and black within woodcut arabesque border, printer's device on final leaf. With parallel text in Hebrew, Latin, Greek, Arabic and Chaldaean (in their respective types), 4 columns to a page, 41 lines. 13 woodcut floriated initials (5 Latin, 4 Hebrew, 2 Greek and 2 Arabic). Rebound in near contemporary brown calf, carefully restored, edges and corners repaired, spine fully rebacked in seven compartments with modern gilt title and date. First edition. - The first polyglot edition of any part of the Bible, and also the first polyglot work ever published. It is of the utmost importance in several further respects, constituting the second book printed in Arabic from movable type (following Gregorio de Gregorii's "Kitab salat as-sawa'i", a Horologion for the Lebanese Melchites, printed in 1514), as well as the earliest Arabic printing of any portion of the Bible. It also contains the first edition of the Aramaic text of the Psalter and offers for the first time Kabbalistic texts from the Zohar. Furthermore, Giustiniani’s commentary provides the first substantial biographical reference to Columbus, and is thus noted as an Americanum. - The learned Dominican Agostino Giustiniani (1470-1536) was Bishop of Nebbio in Corsica from 1514 and later became the first Professor of Arabic and Hebrew at Paris. On his death he bequeathed his extensive library to the state of Genoa. He edited, supervised and financed the present edition and also wrote the commentary. - His book is the first multilingual edition of any part of the Bible. Aldus Manutius had planned a Psalter in three languages as early as the late 15th century, but his project was not realised. Printed in eight parallel columns on double pages, Giustiniani’s work comprises the text in Hebrew, a literal Latin translation thereof, the Latin Vulgate, the Greek Septuagint, Arabic, Aramaic (Chaldee), a literal Latin translation from the Aramaic, and scholia in the same languages. While Giustiniani aimed to edit the entire Bibel in this form, no further sections were published. He described his difficulties in selling the edition in his History of Genoa (1537), recording an edition size of 2,000 paper copies and 50 copies on vellum. - Giustiniani’s extensive commentary includes a long note to Ps. 19:4 ("et in fines orbis omnia verba eorum"; C7r-D1r), about the Genoese Christopher Columbus, who had died in 1506, containing previously unpublished information on his second voyage: "In this interesting sketch of the life and voyages of his fellow-townsman, Bishop Giustiniani gives an interesting account of the discovery of the new world, and states some facts not mentioned elsewhere" (Sabin). - This edition is also the only book printed at Genoa in the 16th century. The Milanese printer Pietro Paulo Porro maintained a press at Turin with his brother Galeazzo. Giustiniani summoned Porro to Genoa especially for the production of this edition, and had set up a press in the house of his brother Nicolo Giustiniani Paulo. The types were designed and cut for this edition under Porro’s direction. - Mild browning throughout, with some occasional waterstaining (more pronounced near beginning). Adams B 1370. Darlow/Moule 1411, 1634 & 2401. Smitskamp, PO, 236. Alden-Landis 516/4. Harrisse, BAV no. 88 (pp. 154-158). Sabin 66468. Sander 5957. G. Roper, Early Arabic Printing in Europe, in: Middle Eastern Languages and the Print Revolution. A Cross-Cultural Encounter (Westhofen 2002), pp. 129-150, at p. 132, with colour ill. IV. StCB 25. Vinograd Genoa 1. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

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         Abramo ripudia Agar

      1516 - Bulino, 1516, datato e monogrammato in lastra in basso al centro. Esemplare nella prima variante di tre. Bellissima prova, impressa su carta vergata coeva priva di filigrana, irregolarmente rifilata alla linea marginale, in buono stato di conservazione. La scena rappresenta l’episodio biblico, raccontato nella Genesi, di Agar ripudiata e abbandonata nel deserto insieme al figlioletto Ismaele. Poiché Sara, moglie legittima di Abramo non riesce ad avere figli, offre al marito la schiava Agar, da cui nascerà Ismaele. Quando però Sara dà alla luce Isacco, impone ad Abramo di allontanare la donna e anche il piccolo Ismaele. Abramo così li mandò via, lasciando alla donna del pane e dell’acqua. La donna si smarrì col piccolo nel deserto e quando l’acqua finì Dio intervenne in soccorso, mostrando alla donna un pozzo d’acqua. Il soggetto incontrerà grande fortuna anche nella pittura, basti pensare - solo per citarne alcune tra le più famose - alle tele del Guercino, di Van Dick e di Malatesta, con variazioni che riguardano l’ambientazione, il numero di figure – spesso sono rappresentati anche Sara e Isacco, l’espressione di Abramo più o meno commossa. Qui è rappresentato il momento del congedo di Abramo dalla donna e Ismaele, appena fuori dalla città. Sul viso di Agar si coglie sofferenza mentre il bimbo osserva innocente e timoroso Abramo, nascondendosi dietro la madre. L’espressione di Abramo è un misto tra fermezza e dolore, il gesto della mano sinistra che tocca il braccio della donna lascia intuire che il distacco è duro anche lui, benché ineluttabile. Engraving, 1516m signed and dated on plate. Example of the first state of three. A very good impression, printed on laid paper, irregularly trimmed at the platemark, good conditions. The scene represents the Biblical story, as told in Genesis, Hagar repudiated and abandoned in the desert along with her son Ishmael. As Sarah, Abraham's legitimate wife is unable to have children , it gives the husband the slave Hagar, Ishmael, from whom will be born. But when Sarah gave birth to Isaac, requires Abraham to remove the woman and also the little Ishmael. Abraham so he sent them away, leaving the woman of bread and water. The woman was lost in the desert with little water and when finished God intervened in the rescue, showing the woman a well of water. The subject will meet with great success in painting , just think - just to name some of the most famous - the paintings by Guercino , Van Dick and Malatesta, with variations that affect the environment , the number of figures - often are also represented Sarah and Isaac, Abraham 's expression more or less moved. Here is accounted for by the time the leave of Abraham and Ishmael woman , just outside the city. On the face of suffering Agar is gathered while the child looks innocent and timid Abraham, hiding behind her mother. The expression of Abraham is a mixture of firmness and pain, the gesture of the left hand touching the woman's arm suggests that the gap is too hard, though inevitable. The New Hollstein, p. 47, 18 a/c; Filedt Kok (1978) 18 a/b; Bartsch 18; Salamon, Lucas van Leyden, n. 69. Dimensioni 125 1mm [Attributes: Signed Copy]

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         Omnia que gesta sunt in Orie[n]te inter Sophi & Maximum Turcarum & Suldanum, & que[m]admodum dux Turcaru[m] caepit Alepum & Damascum & Hierusalem cum om[n]ibus circumiace[n]tibus oppidis, & quo[rum] maximus Turcaru[m] voluit audire una[m] missam apud sanctu[m] sepulchru[m] Iesu Christi.[Basel, Pamphilus Gengenbach, 1518]. 4to. With woodcut illustration on title-page. 19th-century pink wrappers.

      Göllner 115; USTC 679549; VD 16, O 738. Rare 16th-century news pamphlet on the Ottoman-Mamluk War (1516-1517). The booklet relates the events from June 1516 to July 1517, followed by an account of Sultan Selim's visit to Jerusalem. During the Ottoma-Mamluk war the Ottoman Sultan Selim I, known as "the Grim", conquered Syria and defeated the Mamluk Sultan in the Battle of Ridaniya. He subsequently captured and sacked Cairo, thereby placing the holy cities Mecca and Medina under Ottoman rule, which marked the beginning of Ottoman power in Arabia.With two bookplates, some browning, otherwise in very good condition.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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         Biblia cum concordantiis veteris et novi testamentis

      Lyon, 1516. Condition: 7,5 . With 2 full page woodcuts and circa 130 woodcuts in the text. Rubricated Copy. Edition of one of the Sacon-Koberger Bibles printed between 1512 and 1522 by Sacon from Lyon for Anton Koberger. Binding: Contemporary Half Leather Folio

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         Figurarum biblie opus conducibile & putile Quam in eo omnes materie contente: per clarissimum virum Anthonium de Rampegolis: ordinis sancti Augustini in Bibliam studiose applicantur.

      Argentine [i.e. Strasbourg]: Joannem Knoblouch, [1516]. Argentine [i.e. Strasbourg]:: Joannem Knoblouch, [1516].. Small 8vo. Collation: AA12, BB8, A-Z8, Aa-Jj8. Foliation: [20], cclvi ff. Title printed in red and black, large woodcut title vignette of the virgin Mary holding the baby Jesus at her breast surrounded by four angels, 3 small woodcuts, woodcut initial letter. Original full blind-stamped calf, raised bands, two later black leather gilt-stamped labels; rebacked mounting earlier labels, seemingly preserving originally used manuscript [ca. 15th century or earlier] sheets used as pastedowns, manuscript title[?] applied to bottom edge [near spine]. Bound very tightly. Manuscript inscriptions on title obscured with ink. Fine. Early sixteenth century edition of this text from the theologian Antonio Rampegollo printed in Strasbourg by Johannes Knobloch I (d.1528). Knobloch started printing as early as 1497 and was responsible for much of the printing and publishing in this town for the rest of his life, then his son Johannes Knobloch II, continued the business. The text for this edition was previously printed in Cologne by Cornelius von Zierickzee [1505 and 1511]. Perhaps it is significant to point out that the German Reformation, initiated by Martin Luther, began with his Ninety-five Theses issued in 1517, just after this work being printed. ¶

      [Bookseller: Jeff Weber Rare Books ]
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         Institutio principis christiani

      Basel: Johann Froben, May, 1516. saluberrimis refererta praeceptis, per Erasmum Roterodamum, cum alijs nonnullis eodem pertinentibus, quorum catalogum in proxima reperies pagella [bound with 2 other works – see below.] Quarto (209 x 153 mm). Institutio: collates a–p4 q6 A–Z4 AA–BB4: 166 leaves, complete. Contemporary blind-stamped pigskin backing beech boards, clasps and catches, title in contemporary manuscript to fore edge, spine lettered and dated in ink at a much later date. Title pages within woodcut borders, woodcut initials. Early Greek quotation from Hesiod to front free endpaper; contemporary inscription "Isatt"[?] at head of first title and misdated 1516 below the place of publication, struck through and corrected in a later hand; early marginalia and underlining in at least two distinct hands. Backstrip very slightly soiled, but an excellent copy in an unrestored contemporary binding. First edition of Erasmus's famous treatise Institutio principis christiani, published at about the same time as Machiavelli's Il Principe. Written as advice for Prince Charles of Spain (later the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V), Erasmus's work goes far beyond the education of the Prince, and is in fact, like Machiavelli's, a general treatise on the state, its structure, the art of government and the conduct of the Prince; Erasmus, however, aims at harmony and peace, recognizing the rights and duties both of the Prince and the people. Other pieces treating the same subject were added, a list of which is given on verso of the title. Of these Erasmus's translation of a letter by Isocrates to King Nicocles on the importance of education for a king is published here for the first time. Further added are his Panegyricus to Philip the Fair, composed at the occasion of his return to Brussels in 1504 and already containing the same ideas as postulated in the Institutio, together with his letters in defence of this work to Paludanus and Nicolas Ruter. At the end of this part an extra printer's colophon is present, dated April 1516. The dedication, according to Allen, must date from March 1516 and the whole work at the end is dated May 1516. The second part then contains Erasmus' translations of Plutarch's treatises on true friendship, on the use to be made of enemies, on government by the Prince's personal qualities rather than by fear, and on the value of philosopher-friends to the Prince. The first two are respectively dedicated to Henry VIII, king of England, and to Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. The Institutio principis christiani is bound first in the volume with two other works. At the end of the volume is the second edition of a collection of Erasmian texts headed by Enchiridion militis christiani (Handbook of a Christian Knight), Strasbourg: Matthias Schürer, September 1515. In the same month Enchiridion militis Christiani was published as a separate work at Leipzig by Valentin Schumann, at Hieronymus Emser's urging, as it was then in short supply in Saxony. A similar collection was first published at Antwerp, Th. Martens, November 1509. Bound between the two is an incomplete copy of Erasmus's translations from Plutarch (Basel: J. Froben, August 1514), lacking the title leaf.

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         La Temperanza

      1516 - Bulino, 1516-1518 circa, monogrammata in basso a destra MAF, e numerata "5", in basso a sinistra. Da un disegno perduto già attribuito a Raffaello. Bella prova, impressa su carta vergata coeva, priva di filigrana, rifilata alla linea marginale, in ottimo stato di conservazione. L’incisione è la numero 5 della serie le Sette Virtù, che rappresenta le tre virtù teologali e le quattro cardinali collocate all’interno di nicchie. La figura della Temperanza è ritratta con una leggera ed elegante torsione del corpo verso sinistra, mettendo in mostra le redini appoggiate sul braccio, con un capo stretto nella mano. I disegni preparatori per questa serie non si sono conservati. L’attribuzione a Raffaello, accolta da Bartsch e Passavant, risale al Vasari che, nella Vita del Raimondi (V, 413) afferma appunto che la serie sia stata incisa su disegno dell’Urbinate. Già Delaborde dubitava dell’attribuzione, pensando invece ad un possibile allievo come Giulio Romano. Frommel, seguendo un’indicazione di Oberhuber, ne attribuisce l’invenzione al Peruzzi, datando la realizzazione al 1524-27 circa. Bianchi, riprende Delaborde solo in parte, sostenendo che Giulio Romano abbia disegnato solo le tre virtu teologali, mentre quelle cardinali sarebbero invenzione di Raffaello. La serie però è stilisticamente molto omogenea, e senz’altro riconducibile a un progetto unitario. Se l’attribuzione a Raffaello risulta dubitativa per l’assenza della morbidezza e organicità che caratterizzano le sue figure, l’attribuzione al Peruzzi risulta invece più plausibile: sono infatti diverse le corrispondenze tra alcune figure di questa serie con altre opere firmate dal Peruzzi. La datazione sarebbe riconducibile al 1516-1518, a favore della quale depone anche la tecnica esecutiva delle incisioni stesse, con le linee distanziate le une dalle altre a formare incroci semplici che si riscontra in altre opere del Raimondi riferibili allo stesso periodo. Engraving, 1516-1518 c., signed with monogram 'MAF' lower centre, numbered lower left: '5'. After a drawing formely attributed to Raphael. Only state. Good example, printed on contemporary laid paper, trimmed to the margins, in very good conditions. The engraving is the plate 5 from The Seven Virtues, series of seven prints representing the three theological and the four cardinal virtues placed in niches. The figure of Temperance is turned slightly to the left, holding a bridle. The preparatory design, now lost, of the series was assigned to Raphael by Bartsch and Passavant, by following Vasari, and to Giulio Romano by Delaborde. Frommel, following an indication of Oberhuber, attributes the invention to Peruzzi, dating the realization about 1524-27. Bianchi, resumes Delaborde in part, arguing that Giulio Romano has only drawn the three theological virtues, while the Cardinals would invention of Raphael. The series, however, is stylistically homogeneous, and certainly due to a single project. If the attribution to Raphael is doubtful for the absence of softness and organic unity that characterize his figures, the attribution to Peruzzi is instead more plausible: they are different correspondences between some of the figures in this series with other works signed by Peruzzi. The dating would be attributable to 1516-1518, and it’s supported by the engravings technique, with lines spaced from each other to form simple crosses that found in other works of Raimondi referable to the same period. Bartsch, XIV, p. 295 n. 390; Passavant, VI, p. 34 n. 205-211; A. Gnann, Roma e lo stile classico di Raffaello, pp. 122-127 Dimensioni 110 224mm [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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         Gesù Cristo

      1516 - Bulino, 1516 circa, monogrammato in lastra in basso a sinistra. Magnifica prova, ricca di toni, impressa su carta vergata coeva, rifilata al rame, in perfetto stato di conservazione. L’incisione appartiene alla serie Gesù Cristo e gli Apostoli. I disegni preparatori del ciclo – oggi conservati a Chatsworth - sono tradizionalmente attribuiti a Raffaello, mentre è ormai abbandonata l’attribuzione a Giulio Romano, che pure era stata avanzata. Passavant, a torto, ha ritenuto i disegni copie degli apostoli della sala dei Chiaroscuri in Vaticano. È più verosimile che l’Urbinate abbia creato la serie proprio come modello per essere trasposti incisioni. Oltre a Marco Dente, i disegni furono utilizzati anche dal Raimondi. Una parte dei critici ritiene che la serie del Dente sia stata realizzata prima, in ordine di tempo, e provenga direttamente dagli originali di Raffaello, rispetto ai quali risultano in controparte; al contrario, il ciclo del Raimondi sarebbe derivato proprio da queste incisioni, e nello stesso senso dei disegni. Proprio come nei disegni di Chatworth, le aureole di Dente hanno una forma a raggiera, mentre in Marcantonio costituiscono cerchi chiusi. Con ogni probabilità, le incisioni furono realizzate nella stessa epoca dei disegni originali; la tecnica è, infatti, riferibile alle opere giovanili del Dente: le lunghe linee parallele a creare contrasti forti tra chiaro e scuro; la linea di contorno delle figure è la medesima che ricorre nella Venere Anadiomene, del 1516. La serie del Raimondi appare invece più tarda, e incisa all’epoca della morte di Raffaello, o subito dopo. Engraving, about 1516, monogrammed in the plate in the bottom left corner. Magnificent proof, rich tones, printed on contemporary laid paper, trimmed to copperplate, in perfect condition. The incision belongs to the series Jesus Christ and the Apostles. The preparatory drawings of the cycle - now preserved at Chatsworth - are traditionally attributed to Raphael, but is now abandoned the attribution to Giulio Romano, who also had been made. Passavant, wrongly, considered the drawings copies of the apostles of the room Chiaroscuri in the Vatican. It is more likely that the Urbinate has created the series just like the model to be transposed incisions. In addition to Marco Dente, the drawings were also used by Raimondi. One of the critics believed that the series of the tooth has been done before, in chronological order, and comes directly from the original by Raphael, in respect of which result in the counterparty; on the contrary, the cycle of Raimondi would be derived from these incisions, and in the same sense of the drawings. Just as in the drawings of Chatsworth, the halos of tooth have a form in a radial pattern, while Marcantonio are closed circles. In all likelihood, the incisions were made in the same period of the original drawings; the technique is, in fact, referring to the early works of the Tooth: long parallel lines to create strong contrasts between light and dark; the outline of the figures is the same as that used in the Venus Anadiomene, 1516. The series appears instead of Raimondi later, and engraved at the time of Raphael's death, or shortly thereafter. Bartsch, XIV, n. 74; Delaborde, p. 283; Le Blanc, III, p. 275; Oberhuber, pp. 79 - 81. Dimensioni 134 205mm [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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         Institutio principis christiani saluberrimis refererta praeceptis, per Erasmum Roterodamum, cum alijs nonnullis eodem pertinentibus, quorum catalogum in proxima reperies pagella [bound with 2 other works – see below.]

      Basel: Johann Froben, May 1516 - Quarto (209 x 153 mm). Institutio: collates a–p4 q6 A–Z4 AA–BB4: 166 leaves, complete. Contemporary blind-stamped pigskin backing beech boards, clasps and catches, title in contemporary manuscript to fore edge, spine lettered and dated in ink at a much later date. Early Greek quotation from Hesiod to front free endpaper; contemporary inscription "Isatt"[?] at head of first title and misdated 1516 below the place of publication, struck through and corrected in a later hand; early marginalia and underlining in at least two distinct hands. Backstrip very slightly soiled, but an excellent copy in an unrestored contemporary binding. Title pages within woodcut borders, woodcut initials. First edition of Erasmus's famous treatise Institutio principis christiani, published at about the same time as Machiavelli's Il Principe. Written as advice for Prince Charles of Spain (later the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V), Erasmus's work goes far beyond the education of the Prince, and is in fact, like Machiavelli's, a general treatise on the state, its structure, the art of government and the conduct of the Prince; Erasmus, however, aims at harmony and peace, recognizing the rights and duties both of the Prince and the people. Other pieces treating the same subject were added, a list of which is given on verso of the title. Of these Erasmus's translation of a letter by Isocrates to King Nicocles on the importance of education for a king is published here for the first time. Further added are his Panegyricus to Philip the Fair, composed at the occasion of his return to Brussels in 1504 and already containing the same ideas as postulated in the Institutio, together with his letters in defence of this work to Paludanus and Nicolas Ruter. At the end of this part an extra printer's colophon is present, dated April 1516. The dedication, according to Allen, must date from March 1516 and the whole work at the end is dated May 1516. The second part then contains Erasmus' translations of Plutarch's treatises on true friendship, on the use to be made of enemies, on government by the Prince's personal qualities rather than by fear, and on the value of philosopher-friends to the Prince. The first two are respectively dedicated to Henry VIII, king of England, and to Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. The Institutio principis christiani is bound first in the volume with two other works. At the end of the volume is the second edition of a collection of Erasmian texts headed by Enchiridion militis christiani (Handbook of a Christian Knight), Strasbourg: Matthias Schürer, September 1515. In the same month Enchiridion militis Christiani was published as a separate work at Leipzig by Valentin Schumann, at Hieronymus Emser's urging, as it was then in short supply in Saxony. A similar collection was first published at Antwerp, Th. Martens, November 1509. Bound between the two is an incomplete copy of Erasmus's translations from Plutarch (Basel: J. Froben, August 1514), lacking the title leaf. Institutio: VD 16, E 3133; IA 161.467; Adams E 380; Bezzel 1245. Enchiridion: II. VD 16, E 2745; IA 161.462; Adams E 689; Bezzel 846.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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         AD MORTALIUM OBLECTATIONEM . . . ULTIMA PARS OPERIS

      Lugduni: Bernard Lescuyer, 1516. This is an excellent example of a Parisian trade binding of the early 16th century, a category of volumes that Goldschmidt points out have sometimes unjustifiably been "called 'specimens from the Library of Louis XII of France' merely on account of the[ir] very frequent [use of the] . . . roll of bees," a motif that sometimes adorned his bindings. (In any case, the present volume would not have been bound for that monarch, who died the year before the date of publication.) These trade bindings were rarely signed, so we can only say that the present binding was crafted by a Parisian atelier according to the prevailing fashion of the day. The contents here represent several minor works by Baptista Mantuanus (1447-1516), one of the most prolific poets of the Renaissance and someone whose verse became enormously popular and influential in the early modern period, particularly after his eclogues were translated into English. Shakespeare adopted some of his poetry, and both Milton and Spenser also found inspiration in his work. There has been considerable confusion over the collation of this book, based primarily on the lack of page numbers, the presence of more than one colophon, and errors by both Panzer and Brunet. Baudrier gives the most in-depth study of this work, listing two separate volumes and proposing an order of the minor works therein; but he also notes that they are so often jumbled that one can only have a "moderate confidence in the the order they represent." This copy is no exception, and it is likely that the missing signatures were relegated to the second volume (not present here). Several copies on OCLC have similarly discordant foliation. On the other hand, ours does include a brief work by the 4th century Christian poetess Proba which is not present in some other copies. The distinguished previous owner of this volume, George Dunn (1865-1912), was a keen collector of early manuscripts, printed books, and bindings, as well as English law books. His impressive library was sold by Sotheby's in 1913, following his untimely death.. 170 x 100 mm. (6 5/8 x 4"). [248] leaves lacking the "Agelariorum Libri Sex" often found in this volumeVolume I of II FINE CONTEMPORARY ELABORATELY BLIND-STAMPED CALF over pasteboards, covers with frame of rosettes in a curling vine enclosing a central panel with three vertical rolls of bees; raised bands, front joint and spine ends very expertly renewed (corners also probably with some tiny restoration). Front pastedown with book label of George Dunn of Woolley Hall near Maidenhead. Baudrier II, 7-10. For the binding: Goldschmidt 48. Short crack to leather on lower board, other minor wear to binding, title page a bit soiled and a little frayed at edges, other occasional insignificant stains or short tears from paper flaws, but an excellent copy, generally extremely clean and fresh internally, and the binding sound and with well-preserved decoration.This is an excellent example of a Parisian trade binding of the early 16th century, a category of volumes that Goldschmidt points out have sometimes unjustifiably been "called 'specimens from the Library of Louis XII of France' merely on account of the[ir] very frequent [use of the] . . . roll of bees," a motif that sometimes adorned his bindings. (In any case, the present volume would not have been bound for that monarch, who died the year before the date of publication.) These trade bindings were rarely signed, so we can only say that the present binding was crafted by a Parisian atelier according to the prevailing fashion of the day. The contents here represent several minor works by Baptista Mantuanus (1447-1516), one of the most prolific poets of the Renaissance and someone whose verse became enormously popular and influential in the early modern period, particularly after his eclogues were translated into English. Shakespeare adopted some of his poetry, and both Milton and Spenser also found inspiration in his work. There has been considerable confusion over the collation of this book, based primarily on the lack of page numbers, the presence of more than one colophon, and errors by both Panzer and Brunet. Baudrier gives the most in-depth study of this work, listing two separate volumes and proposing an order of the minor works therein; but he also notes that they are so often jumbled that one can only have a "moderate confidence in the the order they represent." This copy is no exception, and it is likely that the missing signatures were relegated to the second volume (not present here). Several copies on OCLC have similarly discordant foliation. On the other hand, ours does include a brief work by the 4th century Christian poetess Proba which is not present in some other copies. The distinguished previous owner of this volume, George Dunn (1865-1912), was a keen collector of early manuscripts, printed books, and bindings, as well as English law books. His impressive library was sold by Sotheby's in 1913, following his untimely death.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         T. Livii Patavini historici clarissimi quae extant Decades ad decem diversa exempla acri iudicio repositae. Cum L. Flori in omneis libros Epitome recognita. Cum annotationibus M. Antonii Sabellici diligenter recognitis.

      Paris, Jodocus Badius Ascensius. 1516 - Folio. 32 n.n. Bl., 280 num. Bl. (8, bb8-dd8, a8-z8, A8-M8 Mit einem Holzschnitt-Titelvignette mit der Druckermarke und schöner Holzschnittbordüre und vielen, zum Teil grossen Initialen in Metallschnitt (?). Titel in Schwarz- und Rotdruck. Schweinslederband der Zeit mit Rollstempelverzierung und 2 intakten Metallschliessen. Moreau II Nr. 1420. - Graesse 4, 226. - 2. Druck der schön gedruckten Ausgabe mit einem schönen Titelblatt und Initialen. - Es fehlt der Bogen aa8 mit einem Teil des Index. - Mit handschriftlichem Besitzvermerk "Joannes Faber Herbstadianj" auf dem Innendeckel und dem Titelblatt sowie vielen handschriftlichen Annotation, Unterstreichungen und Kommentaren von 2 verschiedenen Händen. Johannes Faber (Bamberg 1574 - Rom 1629) war Mediziner, Botaniker, Kunstsammler und eines der ersten Mitglieder der Accademia dei Lincei, Arzt des Papstes und Leiter des Botanischen Gartens des Vatikans. Er schuf den Begriff des Mikroskopes als Gegenteil des Teleskopes. ohannes Fabers Bedeutung wurde erst in den letzten Jahren mit der Aufarbeitung der Geschichte der Accademia dei Lincei erkannt. - Papier stellenweise gebräunt und gewellt. Meist jedoch sauber. Breitrandig, in gutem, wohlerhaltenem Einband.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Thierstein]
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         Sefer T[e]hillim [Hebrew]. Hebraicum Psalterium. Edited by Conradus Pellicanus (1478-1556), with additional corrections by Sebastian Muenster (1488-1552). [Part 2:] WOLFGANG FABER CAPITO (1478-1541). Institutiuncula in Hebraeam linguam

      Basel: Johann Froben, 1516. 16mo (105 x 72 mm). Collation: a-z8 A-B8 C4 (without C4 blank): [203] leaves, imposed in the Hebrew manner; aa-bb8: [16] leaves, imposed in the Roman manner. Hebrew, Roman and Greek types. Froben's woodcut caduceus device on title, one metalcut initial, full-page table of the alphabet in the Institutiuncula. A few small smudges, some very faint marginal discoloration, lower edge of p5 slightly trimmed. Contemporary blind-tooled pigskin, both covers with outer lozenge and floral roll-tool and central panel with a repeated parallel roll-tool forming an allover foliate decor, two brass clasps and catches, plain edges, no free endpapers (one clasp with old string repair, rubbed, spine darkened, some worming to pastedowns); modern calf-backed folding case. Provenance: Philip Jakob Spimberg (?), 17th- or 18th-century signature on front pastedown; with H. P. Kraus, Inc., August, 2002, collation note on lower pastedown. *** first edition of the first pocket edition of any part of the hebrew bible, the first independent hebrew book edited and printed by christian scholars and printers, and the first hebrew text to be printed in basel. This small volume, in its original binding and in exceptional condition, is a great rarity. I locate a single copy in an American library (Mt. Holyoke). No other copies appear to have surfaced in the book trade for at least the past half-century. The present edition was the first of a series of Hebrew editions published by Johann Froben, who was to make of Basel a center of Hebrew printing, at least for Christian Hebraists (Jews were not allowed to reside there other than temporarily). Its production was a collaboration of three humanists associated with the scholarly press. The text was edited by Conrad Pellicanus (Konrad Kürschner), an Alsatian Franciscan who later embraced the Reform, who had published a Hebrew grammar in 1504 (De modo legendi et intelligendi Hebraeum, Strassburg, 1504). Pellicanus' pupil Sebastian Muenster corrected the text and provided the 12-page errata printed at the end of the psalter (B6r-C3v). Cosmographer, mathematician, and "one of the greatest Christian Hebraists of the sixteenth century" (Valmadonna catalogue), Muenster went on to publish many Hebrew works, mostly in Basel, including, 20 years later, the complete Hebrew Bible (also published by Froben). The short Hebrew grammar accompanying the Hebrew text is by another Alsatian humanist, Wolfgang Köpfel or Capito (or Volphangus Faber or Fabritius). At the time professor of theology at Basel, he would later support the Reform, and was an associate and editor of Erasmus. This was the first sextodecimo book printed in Hebrew. Froben's newly designed "slanting Germanic (Ashkenazic) types, similar to those used elsewhere in the German lands, were also employed a few years later by the humanist printer Sébastien Gryphius at Lyons" (Valmadonna catalogue). Froben went on to publish six more editions of the Psalms "in usum itineris" (as described in Capito's preface); the handy format would be copied by printers of Hebrew books throughout Europe. VD16 B 3102; Darlow & Moule 5081; Steinschneider 23; Prijs, Die Basler hebräischen Drucke 1492-1866, no. 6; Hebraica from the Valmadonna Trust (1989 Morgan Library exhibit), no. 19.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
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         Il Petrarcha

      In fine: (Impresso in Milano, in cassa de Alexandro Minutiano, 1516 del mese de febr.) - in-8, ff. CLXXXIIII, (24), raffinata legatura in vitellino verde, ai piatti riquadro di filetti spessi e al centro un'edicola, impressi in oro e bordura floreale a secco; titolo, indicazioni di stampa e fregi in oro al dorso. Testo in carattere corsivo; dati tipografici posti in fine dei Trionfi; segue l'indice e la ristampa della dedica di Aldo ai lettori impressa nel 1514. Rarissima e pregiata edizione eseguita ad imitazione delle aldine; il Minuziano, umanista ed editore e tipografo, nato a San Severo verso il 1450, la dedica a "Ioanne Groliero del Primo re del Mondo Secretario et Thesaurario". Jean Grolier era evidentemente già stimato bibliofilo, malgrado la giovane età. Esemplare assai fresco e puro di edizione veramente inusuale, censita in sole 6 biblioteche pubbliche italiane. Hortis 32; Fowler p. 90-91; Editori e tip. a Milano nel '500, v.2, p.41. Reiner Speck n.200. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Pregliasco]
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         DE TOTA GRAECIA LIBRI DECEM quibus non solum urbium situs, locorumq(ue) intervalla accurate est complexus, sed Regum etiam familias, bellorum causas & eventus, sacrorum ritus, Rerumpub. status copiose descripsit hactenus a nemine in linguam latinam conversi, nuncque prim in lucem editi: Abrahamo Loeschero interprete. ANGEBUNDEN / BOUND WITH: Gerbelius, Nicolaus.

      Folio. 5 nn. leaves, 438 pp, 23 nn. leaves Index. Contemporary pigskin binding, the front fly is missing, the rear is partly splayed. Zeitgen

      [Bookseller: J.J. Heckenhauer e.K.]
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         Libro sulla verità della fede Cristiana sul glorioso Triompho della croce di Christo. (In fine:) Firenze, Io. Stephano di Carlo da Pavia, 1516

      1516. in-4, ff. (76) in bel caratt. tondo, leg. d'amatore a imitazione '500 in p. pelle, filett. e fregi a secco e dorati sui piatti e al dorso. Titolo entro splendida larga bordura silogr. fig., al centro della pag. stupenda vignetta raffig. Dio Padre che regge Cristo in croce, attorniato da cherubini; altra piccola Crocifissione in fine. (La bordura era già stata usata nell' "Arte del ben morire" del 1497. Il legno centrale e quello in fine compaiono per la prima volta). Edizione rarissima, esemplare assai bello.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Pregliasco]
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         15th-century Breviary.

      Low Countries 15th century. Folio (28,1 x 18,0 cm). 129 (of probably 134) leaves, including 3 blank leaves. Two columns. Textblock 20 x 12,5 cm; 31 lines to the page. Written in 15th-century black textura, probably by two hands. Capitals and sentence-heads in red. Later (unreliable) foliation in pencil. Richly blind-tooled calf over wooden boards, gothic binding, spine with five raised bands. Two leather ties without metal clasp. 15th-century Liturgical Manuscript on vellum. Part of a Breviary. Origin probably the Low Countries. The text is divided into 3 parts. The first part of the text (on leaves 1 - 12 recto) contains Psalms. Verso of leaf 12 and the two following leaves (numbered 14 and 15) are blank. The second part of the text, written by another hand, starts rather abruptly on leaf 16 recto in the middle of the Officium text, probably the Officium (parvum) Beatae Mariae Virginis. This part ends on leaf 69-recto. Leaf 69-verso and the next leaf, numbered as 70, are blank. The third part of the text, starting on leaf 71 recto, has been written seemingly by the same (second) hand. It starts, again rather abruptly, in the middle of a sentence and is an account of the lives of the Saints. The composition of this text is as follows: The three parts are separated by the blank leaves 14, 15 and 70 (actually 13, 14 and 69 as the numbering jumps from 12 to 14 and leaf 13 has never existed). Although the pencil numbering of the leaves is unreliable, we have retained it as such. Five (or six) leaves have been cut out and only the inner margin has been kept (after leaves 70, 105, 106, 108, 119 and maybe, but not likely, after 90). Altogether, we think that the original manuscript contained 134 leaves, to be collated as a - n10, o4. Missing leaves g10, l6,l8, m1 and n3. The leaf between i10 and k1 probably never existed. It seems that, apart from the leaves that have been cut out, this manuscript was never completed and that intermediate leaves were left blank in order to be completed later. Another blank leaf, albeit already with the rulings in pencil, mounted on back cover as last endpaper. On leaf 1-recto a large seven-line initial B(eatus vir) in red with threee pictorial elements kept free within (a drollery, a flower ornament and a butterfly. Many two- and three-line lombards in red and blue. Likewise heading markers in red and blue, especially in the third part of the text. Text neatly written (both hands). Contemporary ex-libris in old handwriting on frontal endpaper "Burgundt purcklin im 1516 Jar". Index in old handwriting also in old handwriting: "Hymnarion complens / Psalmos, Cantilena / & Orationes". A very nice contemporary binding of calf over wooden boards with elaborate blind-tooling of both covers, consisting of a great number of blind-tooled pictorial elements (imperial eagles and fleur-de-lys) in rhomboid segments within larger rhomboid sections, formed by oblique lines within a frame, again surrounded by a combination of two larger frames with blind-tooled tendrils, imperial eagles, fleur-de-lys and free roses. Backcover and spine with a few skilfully restored leather-damages; lower margin of first leaf with two holes (probably weak spots of the used skin), but altogether a fine, well-kept example of a neatly written, unfinished breviary manuscript with 129 of the original 134 leaves in a fine contemporary binding. For a full description and more images please visit www.zaalbooks.nl .

      [Bookseller: Zaal Books]
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         Ars juris illuminati doctoris R. Lulii. Que breuissima è et artificio quodam intellectuali clauditur.

      Rome, Jacob Mazochium, 1516. ____ Première édition. Elle a été éditée par Salvatore Gavelli. La pensée lullienne qui a influencé profondément les hommes de la Renaissance est ici appliquée au droit. Titre dans un encadrement gravé sur bois et deux roues des connaissances gravées dont une presque à pleine page. Traces d'humidité dans la marge inférieure, une gravure a peine rognée dans la marge extérieure.***** First edition. It was edited by Salvatore Gavelli. The Llull thought that deeply influenced the men of the Renaissance is here applied to law. Engraved title and two woodcuts of wheels of knowledge, one almost at full page. Very rare. OCLC : No copy in North-America. 2 copies in Germany (Berlin, Erfurt) and 2 copies in British Library. Rogent, Duran, Bibliografía de les impressions Lullianes 63, have never seen a copy. In-4. Collation : 28 ff. [notés 27] Demi-vélin à coins. (Reliure du XIXe.).

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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         De proportione proportionum disputatio.

      Rome: Giacomo Mazzochi, 1516. Extremely rare first edition of this influential and controversial work, an important step towards the arithmetization of the theory of proportion. In the Eudoxian theory of proportion, treated in Book V of Euclid's Elements, proportion is a relation between magnitudes of the same kind, and is not identified with a numerical value. Thus, the ratio of the diagonal of a square to a side is a valid concept in the Euclidean theory of proportion, although it is not identified with a number as this number would (in modern terms) be irrational. The evolution from proportion to numerical ratio began with Umar al-Khayyam in the 12th century and was continued by Nicole Oresme in the 14th. The most decisive progress in the modern era was made by Clavius in his great commentary on Euclid (first published in 1574). Clavius there criticized and completed the Euclidean theory of proportion, and took the first steps toward its arithmetization. According to Rommevaux (p. 72), Clavius's critique was 'certainly inspired' by the present work of Ridolfi, which treats proportions as quantities, so that proportions are just the same as proportions of quantities. Ridolfi's work was attacked by Jean Fernel in his De proportionibus libri duo (1528), who argued that treating proportions as quantities was inconsistent with Euclid, Book V, and that it fails to see when these proportions of proportions are irrational (although understanding this had been one of the major achievements of Oresme). History found in Ridolfi's favour, however, when the arithmetization of the theory of proportion was completed in the next century. S. Rommevaux, Clavius: Une Clé pour Euclide au XVI Siècle, 2006. W. R. Laird & S. Roux (eds.), Mechanics and Natural Philosophy before the Scientific Revolution, 2008 (see pp. 103-105). Smith, Rara Arithmetica, addenda, p. 11; Riccardi I 387; STC Italian, Vol. 3, p. 35. OCLC lists copies at Brown, Columbia, Madison Wisconsin, Michigan and Tübingen; not in COPAC. 4to, ll [28], several marginal woodcut diagrams. Nineteenth-century boards (spine a little worn), housed in a brown morocco-backed folding box.

      [Bookseller: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS]
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         De duplici copia verborum ac rerum commentarii duo Ab authore ipso diligentissime recogniti and emaculati atque in plerisque locis aucti Strassburg Matthias Schürer Oct 1516 Bound with HUTTEN Ulrich von Greek title OUTIS Nemo Augsburg in officina Millerana 9 Sep 1518 and BURLEY Walter Vita philosophorum et poetarum cum auctoribus et sententiis aureis eorundem annexis Strassburg Joannes Knobloch June

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd. ]
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        Stiftskirche zu Thann im Elsass. Bauanfang 1430 Vollendung 1516.

      - Lithographie von Simon Quaglio nach Dominicus Quaglio, ca. 1821. ca. 52 x 67 cm. Einige Knitterspuren im weißen Rand. Zeigt die Stiftskirche von Nord-Westen. Sehr detailreiche Darstellung des Kirchengebäudes, vor allem der Skulpturenschmucks am Westportal. Vor der Nordseite der Kirche liegt ein Marktplatz mit einem Brunnen. Kleine Marktstände sind aufgebaut. Durch das Nordportal verläßt eine kleine Prozession mit Lampenträgern die Kirche. Markt und Kirche sind von Bürgerhäusern umgeben. Unterhalb der Darstellung mit den Künstler- und Druckvermerken: "Aufgenommen u. gemalt von D. Quaglio", "Gedruckt in der Cotta'schen lith. Anstalt" und "Auf Stein gez. v. S. Quaglio". Wie alle Quaglio-Lithographien der Frühzeit ein graphisches Meisterwerk. Shows the collegiate church of North-West. Very detailled illustration of the building, especially the decoration of the sculptures at the west-porch. In front of the north side of the church we find a market and a fountain. Market and church are surrounded by houses. Like all Quaglio-lithographes of the dawn a graphical masterpiece. A few minor wrinkles at the white margin.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Peter Fritzen]
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