viaLibri Requires Cookies CLICK HERE TO HIDE THIS NOTICE

Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1479


         Prent: 'Clare af-beeldinghe ofte effigien der voornaemste conspirateurs, staende op het lichaem vande hoofdeloose Arminiaensche slange. Waer in vertoont word hoe den Orangien boom, mitsgaders religie ende justitie (...) door de strael Gods beschermt wordt.'. 13 portretten op de slang rond de geknakte Arminiaanse boom en een bloeiende Oranjeboom. Anonieme gravure met eronder tekst in boekdruk in 3 kolommen. Gedrukt te Amsterdam door Jan Adriaensz voor Jan Amelisz te Utrecht, 1623. Betreft de same.

      16,5x23 cm., met tekst 39x29 cm.Muller 1479.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat A.G. VAN DER STEUR]
 1.   Check availability:     NVvA     Link/Print  


         Vitae Pontificum.

      Venice: Johannes de Colonia and Johannes Manthen, 1479. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Folio - over 12 - 15" tall. 11 June 1479. Chancery folio (309 x 206 mm). 240 unnumbered leaves, signatures a10 b-o8 p6 q-y8 z10 &8 aa-ee8 ff6 (a1r blank, a1v letter to the author by Squarzifacius, register, a2r text, ff6r colophon, ff6v blank). 40 lines, type: 8:109R3, 110Gk (on c4v). Two 7-line and numerous 2- and 3-line initial spaces, some with printed guide letters. Two large later illuminated initials, the first in liquid gold ornamented in black ink with quatrefoils on the arms of the M, an interlace down the central bar on a ground of blue and mauve, with silver/white penwork decoration of hairline stems and thistle plants, the second initial in blue on a reddish-mauve ground with similar filigree decoration, both with quarter borders of filigree floral sprays. Contemporary red or blue Lombard initials and yellow capital strokes throughout. Contemporary calf over wooden boards, sides ruled in blind with central panel of intersecting triple fillets forming diaper design, small star tools at intersections, rebacked in the 18th century, spine gold-tooled and with gilt lettering (rubbed), endpapers renewed, lacking the two fore-edge clasps and catches, some cracking of spine leather at hinges, several deckle edges preserved. Text generally crisp and clean, small hole in fore-margin of first few leaves, marginal worming in first 4 quires, marginal closed tears to k3-5, bb1 and dd1, not affecting text anywhere. Provenance: neat contemporary Latin marginalia by two different readers, one mixing Latin and Greek; Cornelius Papens (16th or 17th-c. inscription); Louvain, Oratorians, founded 1611 (18th-century inscription "Oratorii Lovaniensis" on first blank page); The Nakles copy (his single-owner sale "Nakles Collection of Incunabula" at Christie's New York, 17 April 2000, lot 106). A magnificient, wide-margined copy in contemporary binding, rarely found complete as here. ----FIRST EDITION of Platina's influential history of the popes from the Apostle Peter to Paul II (died 1471). Platina used his history to show Paul II in an unfavourable light, as he had dismissed Platina from his post in the papal chancery. Johannes de Colonia and Johannes Manthen had acquired their printing material from Venice's first printer, Vindelinus de Spira, in 1473, during the slump of Venetian printing; Johannes de Colonia had previously provided financial backing for de Spira's press. Along with Nicolas Jenson, they dominated Venetian printing during the 1470s, and merged their business with the successful Jenson enterprise in 1480. Complete copies, as here, of the editio princeps are rare and are often lacking the first leaf a1. Goff P768; HC 13045; BMC v 235; BSB-Ink P-565; Bod-inc P-342; GW M33887; Grosjean & O'Connell 94. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: Milestones of Science Books]
 2.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


         Summa Theologiae: Pars secunda, Secunda pars

      330 leaves (of 332, lacking v6-7), final leaf a blank. 51 lines, double column, Gothic type, capital spaces, numbers, & headings of Quaestiones supplied. Thick small folio, cont. Italian blindstamped brown goatskin over wooden boards (see below). Venice: [Leonardus Wild], 1479. Saint Thomas (1225?-74), was the first theologian of the medieval period to adapt Aristotelianism to Christianity. His works formed the foundation of theological studies from the 13th century onwards, and his Summa Theologica was, and still is, the basic theological textbook of the Church, dealing with the nature of God, human intellect, and free will. The Summa is an enormous work, and is divided into three sections: the first is about God, the second (itself in two parts referred to as Prima Secundae and Secunda Secundae) treating man and ethics, and the third (not completed by Saint Thomas) is concerned with Christology. The second part of part two, Secunda Secundae, deals with the virtues and vices. As a guide to morality and ethics, it had a wide circulation as an independent text. It was most frequently printed, from the first edition of Johann Mentelin [not after 1463]. Pars Prima was first printed in 1473, Prima Secundae in 1471, and Pars Tertia in 1474. No collective edition was published until the 1480s. There are throughout this copy of the Quaestio numbers written in the upper right-hand corner of the recto of leaves, with sometimes the actual heading. In certain sections this copy shows signs of careful and close reading, with marginal summaries (on p6 verso occupying the whole margin) and commentary, and occasional corrections to the text. The fact that the central bifolium of quire v is missing (v6-7) was detected early, and "deest hic" written in. The actual text missing is Quaestio CXVIII art 7 (ends "terminantur ad") to Quaestio CXX art 1 (beginning "Ad primum ergo dicedum quod epieikes..."), see St. Thomas, Opera omnia, Rome, 1897, IX, pp. 461a-468b. Vecellio Fore-edge Painting: This painting shows the full-length figure of Saint Thomas Aquinas in the black robes of his Dominican order writing or reading at his desk. His name is written vertically D. THOMAS, and horizontally in abbreviated form below lower clasp. Top and bottom edges are marbled with a criss-cross pattern. The painted decoration is the work of Cesare Vecellio (1521-1601), a cousin and pupil of Titian, in whose studio Vecellio worked until Titian's death. Among Vecellio's major paintings is the altarpiece at Belluno Cathedral. In addition to the painted fore-edges executed for the Pillones, Vecellio also painted a room in the Palazzo Pillone with the Four Seasons and the Rape of the Sabines. In his famous book on costume and manners, De gli habiti antichi et moderni (Venice: 1590), Vecellio mentions the library and other collections of the Pillone family as well as their generous hospitality. For his imagery, Vecellio took each book's author or content, so there are a series of author portraits, as here, or scenes, maps and views. 172 volumes were decorated in this way, 154 with fore-edges painted by Vecellio and 21 with original drawings on their vellum covers by him and other artists. Provenance: 1. Antonio Pillone (1464-1533), Belluno; binding. 2. Odorico Pillone (1503-1593), Belluno; fore-edges. 3. Sir Thomas Brooke (1830-1908), Armitage Bridge, Yorkshire; bookplate; sold by his heirs in 1957 to 4. Pierre Berès (1913-2008), Paris. The Pillone Library has long been celebrated. Noted already in the 16th century as a library of "molti e diversi libri," it is celebrated among bibliophiles today for the remarkable painted decoration of its fore-edges and as a rare survival up to the modern day of a Renaissance library. The Pillone family, originally of Val Cadore, was prominent in the civic history of Belluno. Their library at Villa Casteldardo outside Belluno was primarily formed by the father and son, Antonio (1464-1533), and Odorico (1503-94), the former a soldier and diplomat, the latter a learned jurist. In the 1580s Odorico Pillone (or possibly his son Giorgio) commissioned Vecellio to decorate the fore-edges of a substantial portion of the best books in the library with paintings related to the contents. The 172 volumes decorated by Vecellio have had a remarkably stable existence over the next four centuries, which accounts in large measure for their almost uniformly excellent state of preservation. They remained together with other family collections until 1874 when the library was sold to the Venetian antiquarian Paolo Maresio Bazolle. The decorated volumes were then bought en bloc by the Yorkshire baronet Sir Thomas Brooke (1830-1908), and remained in his family until they were acquired and finally dispersed by Pierre Berès in 1957. Thanks to their unusual decoration and to the fact that the library remained intact until the 1950s, all of the Pillone books have been preserved in their original bindings. Binding: Contemporary north-east Italian binding of brown goatskin over inner-bevelled wooden boards, panelled sides tooled with knotwork, cross and flower-head tools. Spine with three raised bands, the compartments with diagonal fillets and flower-heads. Originally four clasps: at upper and lower edge, and two at fore edge, with shaped metal catchplates on back cover. Flyleaf at each end from a decorated glossed manuscript on vellum of the decretals of Gregory IX, probably Bologna, c. 1300 (?). Numerous deckle edges preserved. Light marginal staining to first quire, a few sheets lightly browned, marginal paper flaw in p5 and x7. Two of four clasps preserved, binding a little scuffed, small areas of wear or loss, a few small wormholes, lightly restored. ❧ Berès, Bibliothèque Pillone, 60. Goff T-215. ISTC it00215000.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
 3.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Mammotrectus super Bibliam

      Venice: Nicolaus Jenson, 1479. 4to (212 x 146 mm). Collation: A10 B-C8; a-y8 1-68 710 (A1 blank, A2r-C8v subject index; a1r author's prologue, a1r-7/9v text, colophon on 7/9v, 7/10r-v table of contents). [260] leaves. Double column, 38 lines and headline. Types: 3:106G (headlines and openings of each book), 6:84(75)G (text). Capital spaces with guide letters. Rubricated: pearled Lombard initials in red, some with extenders, many with additional (slightly later?) black penwork infill, capital strokes and paragraph marks in red. A contemporary supplementary manuscript register of Biblical names on recto of blank leaf A1, neatly written in two columns; contemporary manuscript foliation (1-234), leaf numbers added to the table, and a few marginal notes, all in the same hand. A few mostly marginal wormholes in first few quires, more worming in last few quires, light marginal dampstaining to last 8 or so leaves, a couple of red smudges (rubricator's?) on r5v and y8r. Large copy, preserving some deckle edges. Binding: Contemporary South German or Austrian dark brown blind-stamped calf over wooden boards, covers with large central panel outlined by triple fillets and with intersecting fillets forming a saltire design, outer borders stamped with a repeated Maria banderole tool, the compartments of the panel stamped with two sizes of rosettes, a fleur-de-lis, a circular ihs tool, a three-leaved plant, a teardrop-shaped dragon tool, drawer-handle tool and larger leafy plant tool; ten incised and embossed brass corner-and centerpiece bosses, two brass fore-edge clasps and catches, the leather renewed, spine with banderole tools, with erroneous 19th-century paper label "S. Hieronym Expositio antiqua," 5 red-dyed parchment index tabs, quire liners of manuscript waste; spine rubbed, leather abraded at head and tail exposing endbands, oversewn with later thread, woming, especially to lower cover (possibly recased but apparently not a remboîtage, the worming in the inner covers matching the text block). Modern linen folding case. Provenance: contemporary manuscript imprecation against thieves on front pastedown, manuscript register and annotations as described above. *** A fine copy of Jenson's edition of this important Franciscan Biblical and liturgical aid, popular in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, containing hundreds of short entries providing etymological and grammatical explanations of terms found in the Vulgate and in liturgy. Written between 1279 and 1297, by Giovanni Marchesino, a friar from Reggio Emilia, the Mammotrectus was "maternal milk" for the uneducated clergy (the term had been used by Augustine in his Commentary on the Psalms). Using synonyms and paraphrases, Marchesino taught barely literate priests how to pronounce the Latin words from the Bible which they read aloud and sang in Church, what the words meant, and how to use them in sentences. The first and longest part, arranged in order of the books of the Bible, from Genesis to Apocalypse, provides definitions, etymology, pronunciation and declensions of difficult words. This is followed by sections on the Psalms, the Lives of the Saints, basic Biblical exegesis, information on Hebrew festivals and customs, and extensive explanations of liturgical texts, including antiphons and responses, Eucharistic prayers, hymns, and sermons for every day of the ecclesiastical calendar. Packed with information, the work remained for two hundred years "the chief manual for poorly-educated priests" (Moss). It was used by young friars, who needed to master the Biblical texts and to use them in preaching. A third part, found in some manuscripts but apparently not in the printed tradition, contained an explanation of the Franciscan rule and papal bulls related to the order. Twenty-three surviving 15th-century editions were followed by only a handful of editions in the early sixteenth century, by which time the Mammotrectus had become on object of derision on the part of the Reformists, for whom it was perhaps an unwelcome reminder of the ignorance of the clergy. Jenson's edition essentially reprinted the 1478 edition of Renner and Bartua (Goff M238). The omitted line and a half at the end of the second column on y8v appears to have been printed in this copy (not stamped in, as in British Library copy, IA. 197929). Quire 1 is here correctly printed (cf. BMC). The owner of this attractive copy supplied his own supplemental index of names. I have not been able to identify the binding shop; the tools are not reproduced in the Einbanddatenbank, Kyriss, or Schunke Schwenke Sammlung. Goff M-239; CIBN M-124; Walsh 1593, 1594; ; BMC V 180; BSB-Ink M-158; GW M20819. Cf. Ann Moss, "Latin Liturgical Hymns and their Early Printing History 1470-1520," Humanistica Lovaniensia, 36 (1987), 112-37, esp. p. 118; Frans van Liere, "Marchesino da Reggio (Giovanni Marchesini)", Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 69 (2007).

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
 4.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


         Quadragesimale

      [Nuremberg]: Anton Koberger, 1479. Royal folio (414 x 284 mm). Collation as in BMC & GW. 246 leaves, unfoliated, including first and final blanks. 51 lines and headline, double column. Gothic types 4:160 (headings and headlines), 3:110a (text). Initial spaces. Fine large opening initial supplied in pink with foliate modelling, green filigree geometric infill and leafy extensions; rubricated in red with four-line Lombard pearled initials, some with flourishes, capital strokes and underlinings; small marginal section numbers supplied by the rrubricator. A large copy, preserving numerous deckle edges and many contemporary manuscript quire signatures in red ink. Fine condition (a few wormholes at end). Binding: contemporary Austrian blind-stamped white alum-tawed, skin, now faded to a tan color except where protected by the now missing metal furniture and title label, over wooden boards, from the cloister bindery of the Lambach Benedictines, sewn on four double sewing supports plus single supports (Kapitalbünde) at head and tail, the spine leather extending over the Kapitalbünde with perforated tabbed caps, an early textile ribbon bookmark knotted through one of the holes in the top extension, sides panelled with fillets, outer borders containing repeated impressions of small angled stick tools, large central panel with intersecting diagonal double fillets forming a saltire design, the interstices decorated with several tools including a rosette, palmette, quatrefoil, Ranke and star tool, evidence of removed center- and corner-pieces on both covers and of a parchment title label on upper cover, original small parchment label under the space for the title label with Lambach shelfmark "E.18" in red ink; two brass fore-edge catchplates on upper cover and two clasp-strap attachments on lower cover, the leather clasps fragmentary and lacking the metal hook clasps, the brass catchplates and one attachment stamped "Maria," plain endpapers, vellum manuscript spine liners from a fifteenth-century rubricated bible (see below), plain endpapers, later stencilled paper lettering piece on spine (rubbed, some scrapes, some worming, especially to lower cover). Provenance: Conrad Loher or Löher, 1499 presentation inscription to the Benedictines of Lambach: D[o]m[i]n[u]s Conradus Loher donauit hunc libru[m] Monasterio Lambacensi Anno d[omi]ni 1499; Lambach (Upper Austria), Benedictines, binding, shelfmark, inscribed identification of the work (full title and author) by the Lambach ?librarian on recto of initial blank leaf, with the number 37 in same hand; a couple of contemporary marginal notes in brown ink, a few manicules in outer margins in the same ink (ff. 14/6r, 27/7r, 28/5r, 29/2r, 30/6r, 31/4v, 31/5r and v); sold Hartung & Hartung, 14 May 2002, lot 150. *** The eighth of 24 known incunable editions of this popular collection of 50 Lenten sermons, and the first of three Koberger editions. The author is identified in the printed editions as Johannes Gritsch, or Grütsch, Professor of Theology (or Law) at Basel, but the true author, as shown by A. Murith in 1940, is now thought to have been Grütsch's brother Conrad, a Franciscan who served churches in Vienna, Zurich, and other locations in Alsace and Switzerland. Intended as a handbook for preachers, the sermons use exempla from the Bible and Church Fathers, as well as from secular medieval and classical sources, including Ovid, which may account for their huge popularity. The Verfasserlexikon notes the occasional use of Gerrman words and phrases in the Latin text. The work is organized by date, i,e., the Sundays throughout the year, and the 18-leaf subject Register of the two preliminary quires is keyed to both the Sunday (indicated by numbers in the headings and headlines) and the sections within each Sunday's sermon, which are indicated by letters. As these letters are buried in the text in this edition, the rubricator of this copy took care to lightly mark the letters in the outer margins to assist the reader. This very fine copy was probably rubricated and definitely bound in the monastic bindery of Lambach Abbey in Upper Austria, whose scriptorium was active from the 12th century. Lambach became a voracious buyer of books in the late 15th century, amassing a large number of printed books as well as manuscripts. A native of nearby Schwanenstadt, the local parish priest Conrad Loher or Löher (as spelled here) donated a group of manuscripts and printed books to the monastery in 1499. A number of these books were clearly bound in the monastic shop 20 or so years earlier, providing evidence that this large monastic bindery seems to have carried out work for customers outside the monastery (cf. Holter, p. 284). Similar inscriptions, all dated 1499, appear in the other books donated by Loher. The monastic inscription identifying the book, on the first blank leaf, appears to be in the same large rather spiky hand as the inscription in a Lambach incunable in the Morgan Library, PML 30218 (William of Ockham, In primum librum Sententiarum, [Urach: Conrad Fyner] 1483, Goff O-14). Approximately two-thirds of the Lambach books were later sold, or made their way to the Austrian National Library, mainly in the twentieth century. The tools on this binding, many first inventoried by Kurt Holter in 1954, are Einbanddatenbank s015770 (rhombus with four-petalled blossom), s015799 (little angled stick), s015776 (palmette), s015793 (6-pointed star), s015773 (rosette), s015782 (Ranke or leafy branch with fruits), s015769 (Steinbock or mountain goat), and s015800 (a tiny fleur-de-lis). Several impressions of one or two diamond-shaped tools are too rubbed to identify. The binding is noteworthy for the perforated extensions of the leather or skin of the spine at the head and tail, known as " tab caps" (see Ligatus, Language of Bindings website, http://www.ligatus.org.uk/lob/concept/3060), covering the Kapitalbünde (a distinctive feature of late 15th- and early 16th-century South German bookbindings). It appears that the perforations in the flaps may have been intended for other bookmarks, which would have made it easy for the reader to mark several pages at once. The textile bookmark attached to the top tabbed cap is "clearly early but looks to be an amateur addition making use of a convenient hole" (Nicholas Pickwoad, email correspondence) - our grateful thanks to Dr. Pickwoad for his invaluable comments on the binding material and structure. The Lambach monastic bindery regularly dismembered old manuscripts from the Abbey scriptorium and re-used them in bindings. Many fragments of older Lambach manuscripts have been recorded, including those held by the Beinecke Library, the subject of an exhibition in 1993 (cf. Babcock, Reconstructing a medieval library: fragments from Lambach, New Haven, 1993). In the present example, the vellum spine liner is from a fifteenth-century folio manuscript Bible in a large gothic hand, in 32 lines (recto and verso), a few lines being apparently commentary in smaller script, this leaf from Genesis 42.13-14. The strip at the front of the text block is blank, being from the margin, the strip visible at the end of the text block has the beginnings of the lines of the recto side and ends of the lines of the verso. On the recto are 5 decorated initials of which 4 in alternating red and blue with contrasting filigree infill. Goff G-494; BMC II 417 (with erroneous date 26 Feb. 1479); GW 11545. On Gritsch cf.Verfasserlexikon2 3:291-294; on the binding and provenance cf. Kurt Holter, "Zum gotischen Bucheinband in Österreich: Die Buchbinderwerkstatt des Stiftes Lambach," Gutenberg Jahrbuch 1954: 280-289.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
 5.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


         Biblia Latina

      Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, 1479. Third bible printed by Koberger, complete. Double column, 51 lines of Gothic type in Vulgate Latin, some printed marginalia, with versal letters in red & blue and decorative pen initials throughout, interior as if new, quires lettered in modern pencil. Marbled endpapers, a few contemporary annotations, first page now glued to end leaf. Brown calf with two clasps. Magnificent copy.

      [Bookseller: B & L Rootenberg Rare Books & Manuscript]
 6.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


         Vita Theoderici Regis Ostrogothorum Et Italiae, Autore Joanne Cochleo Germano. Cum Additamentis et Annotationibus, quae Sveo-Gothorum ex Scandia Expeditiones et commercia illustrant Opera Johannis Peringskiöld.

      Neuausgabe der Lebensbeschreibung von Theoderich (451/56-526), dem König der Ostgoten, aus der Feder des Johannes Cochlaeus (1479-1552), die Erstausgabe war 1544 erschienen. - Gering berieben, handschriftlicher Eintrag zur großen Seltenheit des Bandes ("Liber admodum infrequens ...") auf Innendeckel, Stempel mit Tilgungsvermerk (Stadtbibliothek Frankfurt) verso Titelblatt, insgesamt sehr wohlerhaltenes Exemplar.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Tautenhahn]
 7.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


         Reyneke Vosz de olde, nye gedrucket, mit sidlykem vorstande unde schonen figuren, erlüchtet unde vorbetert.(Colophon: Rostock, Stephan Mölleman for Laurentz Albrechts, in Lübeck), 1592. Small 4to (20 x 16 cm). With letterpress title printed in red and black in an illustrated woodcut border (partly coloured in an early hand), and 53 small woodcut costume-figures and 44 large woodcut illustrations in text. Blind-tooled vellum (dated 1603), with central oval ornament and the letters "MEL" and "IPR" and the numbers "16" and "03".

      Goedeke I, p. 482; Menke VI, 17 (1); VD16, R 998 (6 copies). Rostock-Lübeck edition of the phenomenal animal epic Reynard the Fox. The Reynard stories were already established as a coherent collection in the 12th century and were first printed in 1479, in a Dutch prose edition. A lot of variation exists between the Reynard stories, but the Dutch tradition, starting with the very well regarded and highly original adaptation by Willem, is the most dominant. The main story takes place in the court of a lion king, where all the other animal subjects complain to the monarch about Reynard's trickery, which leaves room for each animal to tell a story about the fox his wits, and cunning and criminal behaviour. The stories satirize nobility, clergy and peasants alike, not shunning scatological humour. The book, in German verse, is adorned with a large number of small woodcuts of male and female costumes, of noble-men and -women, monks, beggars, merchants, soldiers, etc., often repeated. The large woodcut illustrations were made after those in the first Rostock edition of 1539, of which 36 are ascribed to Erhard Altdorfer.With 17th-century manuscript entries. Browned, with some marginal water stains and some occasional spots. Recased with new endpapers, binding slightly soiled with some damage to outer border. Good copy.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
 8.   Check availability:     NVvA     Link/Print  


         Rationale divinorum officiorum. [Herausgegeben von Johannes Aloisius Tuscanus].

      [Treviso, Michele Manzolo], 1479. Fol. 280 nn. Bll. (Rom. Typ., 2 Kol., 49 Zeilen; Min. f. Init.), Blindgepr. gotischer Ldr.-Bd. d. Zt. a. 3 Bünden. Frühe und seltene Ausgabe dieses erstmals 1459 bei Fust in Mainz erschienenen Werkes. - Der französische Kanoniker Guillelmus Duranti (1237-1296) schrieb seinen liturgischen Traktat in Italien vor 1286. Das in zahlr. Handschriften und Inkunabeln überlieferte Werk zählt zu den wichtigen Quellen für die Kenntnis der westlichen Liturgie. Zur Bedeutung innerhalb des kanonischen Rechts vgl. Schulte, Lit. d. kanon. Rechts II, 144ff. - Einband beschabt, etw. bestoßen u. mit einigen Wurmspuren. Rücken u. Vorderdeckel m. Nummernschildchen. Schnitt m. alter Titelbeschriftung. Alte Besitzvermerke a. Innendeckel u. den ersten beiden Bll. Unterschiedlich gebräunt bzw. fleckig (Ränder tlw. etw. stärker). Tlw. Wurmspuren. Die letzten Bll. etw. feuchtrandig, dadurch wenige Bll. m. kl. Läsuren bzw. Fehlstellen im weißen Rand. Rückendeckel m. Resten einer zeitgen. Halterung für eine Kette, dadurch die letzten Bll. im oberen weißen Rand m. kl. Rostspuren. - GW 09119; Hain 6481; Goff D 419; Rhodes, Treviso 38; IGI 3628; Pellechet 4500; BSB-Ink D-337; Proctor 6471; Madsen 1469; BMC VI, 887; ISTC id00419000. Versand D: 12,00 EUR Duranti, Rationale divinorum officiorum. [Herausgegeben von Johannes Aloisius Tuscanus], Treviso, Inkunabel, Inkunabeln, Wiegendrucke

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
 9.   Check availability:     buchfreund.de     Link/Print  


         Biblia Latina

      Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, 1479. Third bible printed by Koberger, complete. Double column, 51 lines of Gothic type in Vulgate Latin, some printed marginalia, with versal letters in red & blue and decorative pen initials throughout, interior as if new, quires lettered in modern pencil. Marbled endpapers, a few contemporary annotations, first page now glued to end leaf. Brown calf with two clasps. Magnificent copy.

      [Bookseller: B & L Rootenberg Rare Books & Manuscript]
 10.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         Quadragesimale

      [Nuremberg]: Anton Koberger, 1479. Royal folio (414 x 284 mm). Collation as in BMC & GW. 246 leaves, unfoliated, including first and final blanks. 51 lines and headline, double column. Gothic types 4:160 (headings and headlines), 3:110a (text). Initial spaces. Fine large opening initial supplied in pink with foliate modelling, green filigree geometric infill and leafy extensions; rubricated in red with four-line Lombard pearled initials, some with flourishes, capital strokes and underlinings; small marginal section numbers supplied by the rrubricator. A large copy, preserving numerous deckle edges and many contemporary manuscript quire signatures in red ink. Fine condition (a few wormholes at end). Binding: contemporary Austrian blind-stamped white alum-tawed, skin, now faded to a tan color except where protected by the now missing metal furniture and title label, over wooden boards, from the cloister bindery of the Lambach Benedictines, sewn on four double sewing supports plus single supports (Kapitalbünde) at head and tail, the spine leather extending over the Kapitalbünde with perforated tabbed caps, an early textile ribbon bookmark knotted through one of the holes in the top extension, sides panelled with fillets, outer borders containing repeated impressions of small angled stick tools, large central panel with intersecting diagonal double fillets forming a saltire design, the interstices decorated with several tools including a rosette, palmette, quatrefoil, Ranke and star tool, evidence of removed center- and corner-pieces on both covers and of a parchment title label on upper cover, original small parchment label under the space for the title label with Lambach shelfmark "E.18" in red ink; two brass fore-edge catchplates on upper cover and two clasp-strap attachments on lower cover, the leather clasps fragmentary and lacking the metal hook clasps, the brass catchplates and one attachment stamped "Maria," plain endpapers, vellum manuscript spine liners from a fifteenth-century rubricated bible (see below), plain endpapers, later stencilled paper lettering piece on spine (rubbed, some scrapes, some worming, especially to lower cover). Provenance: Conrad Loher or Löher, 1499 presentation inscription to the Benedictines of Lambach: D[o]m[i]n[u]s Conradus Loher donauit hunc libru[m] Monasterio Lambacensi Anno d[omi]ni 1499; Lambach (Upper Austria), Benedictines, binding, shelfmark, inscribed identification of the work (full title and author) by the Lambach ?librarian on recto of initial blank leaf, with the number 37 in same hand; a couple of contemporary marginal notes in brown ink, a few manicules in outer margins in the same ink (ff. 14/6r, 27/7r, 28/5r, 29/2r, 30/6r, 31/4v, 31/5r and v); sold Hartung & Hartung, 14 May 2002, lot 150. *** The eighth of 24 known incunable editions of this popular collection of 50 Lenten sermons, and the first of three Koberger editions. The author is identified in the printed editions as Johannes Gritsch, or Grütsch, Professor of Theology (or Law) at Basel, but the true author, as shown by A. Murith in 1940, is now thought to have been Grütsch's brother Conrad, a Franciscan who served churches in Vienna, Zurich, and other locations in Alsace and Switzerland. Intended as a handbook for preachers, the sermons use exempla from the Bible and Church Fathers, as well as from secular medieval and classical sources, including Ovid, which may account for their huge popularity. The Verfasserlexikon notes the occasional use of Gerrman words and phrases in the Latin text. The work is organized by date, i,e., the Sundays throughout the year, and the 18-leaf subject Register of the two preliminary quires is keyed to both the Sunday (indicated by numbers in the headings and headlines) and the sections within each Sunday's sermon, which are indicated by letters. As these letters are buried in the text in this edition, the rubricator of this copy took care to lightly mark the letters in the outer margins to assist the reader. This very fine copy was probably rubricated and definitely bound in the monastic bindery of Lambach Abbey in Upper Austria, whose scriptorium was active from the 12th century. Lambach became a voracious buyer of books in the late 15th century, amassing a large number of printed books as well as manuscripts. A native of nearby Schwanenstadt, the local parish priest Conrad Loher or Löher (as spelled here) donated a group of manuscripts and printed books to the monastery in 1499. A number of these books were clearly bound in the monastic shop 20 or so years earlier, providing evidence that this large monastic bindery seems to have carried out work for customers outside the monastery (cf. Holter, p. 284). Similar inscriptions, all dated 1499, appear in the other books donated by Loher. The monastic inscription identifying the book, on the first blank leaf, appears to be in the same large rather spiky hand as the inscription in a Lambach incunable in the Morgan Library, PML 30218 (William of Ockham, In primum librum Sententiarum, [Urach: Conrad Fyner] 1483, Goff O-14). Approximately two-thirds of the Lambach books were later sold, or made their way to the Austrian National Library, mainly in the twentieth century. The tools on this binding, many first inventoried by Kurt Holter in 1954, are Einbanddatenbank s015770 (rhombus with four-petalled blossom), s015799 (little angled stick), s015776 (palmette), s015793 (6-pointed star), s015773 (rosette), s015782 (Ranke or leafy branch with fruits), s015769 (Steinbock or mountain goat), and s015800 (a tiny fleur-de-lis). Several impressions of one or two diamond-shaped tools are too rubbed to identify. The binding is noteworthy for the perforated extensions of the leather or skin of the spine at the head and tail, known as " tab caps" (see Ligatus, Language of Bindings website, http://www.ligatus.org.uk/lob/concept/3060), covering the Kapitalbünde (a distinctive feature of late 15th- and early 16th-century South German bookbindings). It appears that the perforations in the flaps may have been intended for other bookmarks, which would have made it easy for the reader to mark several pages at once. The textile bookmark attached to the top tabbed cap is "clearly early but looks to be an amateur addition making use of a convenient hole" (Nicholas Pickwoad, email correspondence) - our grateful thanks to Dr. Pickwoad for his invaluable comments on the binding material and structure. The Lambach monastic bindery regularly dismembered old manuscripts from the Abbey scriptorium and re-used them in bindings. Many fragments of older Lambach manuscripts have been recorded, including those held by the Beinecke Library, the subject of an exhibition in 1993 (cf. Babcock, Reconstructing a medieval library: fragments from Lambach, New Haven, 1993). In the present example, the vellum spine liner is from a fifteenth-century folio manuscript Bible in a large gothic hand, in 32 lines (recto and verso), a few lines being apparently commentary in smaller script, this leaf from Genesis 42.13-14. The strip at the front of the text block is blank, being from the margin, the strip visible at the end of the text block has the beginnings of the lines of the recto side and ends of the lines of the verso. On the recto are 5 decorated initials of which 4 in alternating red and blue with contrasting filigree infill. Goff G-494; BMC II 417 (with erroneous date 26 Feb. 1479); GW 11545. On Gritsch cf.Verfasserlexikon2 3:291-294; on the binding and provenance cf. Kurt Holter, "Zum gotischen Bucheinband in Österreich: Die Buchbinderwerkstatt des Stiftes Lambach," Gutenberg Jahrbuch 1954: 280-289.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
 11.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Mammotrectus super Bibliam.

      Venice: Nicolaus Jenson, 23 Sept. 1479. 4to (212 x 146 mm). Collation: A10 B-C8; a-y8 1-68 710 (A1 blank, A2r-C8v subject index; a1r author's prologue, a1r-7/9v text, colophon on 7/9v, 7/10r-v table of contents). [260] leaves. Double column, 38 lines and headline. Types: 3:106G (headlines and openings of each book), 6:84(75)G (text). Capital spaces with guide letters. Rubricated: pearled Lombard initials in red, some with extenders, many with additional (slightly later?) black penwork infill, capital strokes and paragraph marks in red. A contemporary supplementary manuscript register of Biblical names on recto of blank leaf A1, neatly written in two columns; contemporary manuscript foliation (1-234), leaf numbers added to the table, and a few marginal notes, all in the same hand. A few mostly marginal wormholes in first few quires, more worming in last few quires, light marginal dampstaining to last 8 or so leaves, a couple of red smudges (rubricator's?) on r5v and y8r. Large copy, preserving some deckle edges. Binding: Contemporary South German or Austrian dark brown blind-stamped calf over wooden boards, covers with large central panel outlined by triple fillets and with intersecting fillets forming a saltire design, outer borders stamped with a repeated Maria banderole tool, the compartments of the panel stamped with two sizes of rosettes, a fleur-de-lis, a circular ihs tool, a three-leaved plant, a teardrop-shaped dragon tool, drawer-handle tool and larger leafy plant tool; ten incised and embossed brass corner-and centerpiece bosses, two brass fore-edge clasps and catches, the leather renewed, spine with banderole tools, with erroneous 19th-century paper label "S. Hieronym Expositio antiqua," 5 red-dyed parchment index tabs, quire liners of manuscript waste; spine rubbed, leather abraded at head and tail exposing endbands, oversewn with later thread, woming, especially to lower cover (possibly recased but apparently not a remboîtage, the worming in the inner covers matching the text block). Modern linen folding case. Provenance: contemporary manuscript imprecation against thieves on front pastedown, manuscript register and annotations as described above. *** A fine copy of Jenson's edition of this important Franciscan Biblical and liturgical aid, popular in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, containing hundreds of short entries providing etymological and grammatical explanations of terms found in the Vulgate and in liturgy. Written between 1279 and 1297, by Giovanni Marchesino, a friar from Reggio Emilia, the Mammotrectus was "maternal milk" for the uneducated clergy (the term had been used by Augustine in his Commentary on the Psalms). Using synonyms and paraphrases, Marchesino taught barely literate priests how to pronounce the Latin words from the Bible which they read aloud and sang in Church, what the words meant, and how to use them in sentences. The first and longest part, arranged in order of the books of the Bible, from Genesis to Apocalypse, provides definitions, etymology, pronunciation and declensions of difficult words. This is followed by sections on the Psalms, the Lives of the Saints, basic Biblical exegesis, information on Hebrew festivals and customs, and extensive explanations of liturgical texts, including antiphons and responses, Eucharistic prayers, hymns, and sermons for every day of the ecclesiastical calendar. Packed with information, the work remained for two hundred years "the chief manual for poorly-educated priests" (Moss). It was used by young friars, who needed to master the Biblical texts and to use them in preaching. A third part, found in some manuscripts but apparently not in the printed tradition, contained an explanation of the Franciscan rule and papal bulls related to the order. Twenty-three surviving 15th-century editions were followed by only a handful of editions in the early sixteenth century, by which time the Mammotrectus had become on object of derision on the part of the Reformists, for whom it was perhaps an unwelcome reminder of the ignorance of the clergy. Jenson's edition essentially reprinted the 1478 edition of Renner and Bartua (Goff M238). The omitted line and a half at the end of the second column on y8v appears to have been printed in this copy (not stamped in, as in British Library copy, IA. 197929). Quire 1 is here correctly printed (cf. BMC). The owner of this attractive copy supplied his own supplemental index of names. I have not been able to identify the binding shop; the tools are not reproduced in the Einbanddatenbank, Kyriss, or Schunke Schwenke Sammlung. Goff M-239; CIBN M-124; Walsh 1593, 1594; ; BMC V 180; BSB-Ink M-158; GW M20819. Cf. Ann Moss, "Latin Liturgical Hymns and their Early Printing History 1470-1520," Humanistica Lovaniensia, 36 (1987), 112-37, esp. p. 118; Frans van Liere, "Marchesino da Reggio (Giovanni Marchesini)", Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 69 (2007).

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books]
 12.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


         Quadragesimale.

      [Nuremberg]: Anton Koberger, 27 February 1479. Royal folio (414 x 284 mm). Collation as in BMC & GW. 246 leaves, unfoliated, including first and final blanks. 51 lines and headline, double column. Gothic types 4:160 (headings and headlines), 3:110a (text). Initial spaces. Fine large opening initial supplied in pink with foliate modelling, green filigree geometric infill and leafy extensions; rubricated in red with four-line Lombard pearled initials, some with flourishes, capital strokes and underlinings; small marginal section numbers supplied by the rrubricator. A large copy, preserving numerous deckle edges and many contemporary manuscript quire signatures in red ink. Fine condition (a few wormholes at end). Binding: contemporary Austrian blind-stamped white alum-tawed, skin, now faded to a tan color except where protected by the now missing metal furniture and title label, over wooden boards, from the cloister bindery of the Lambach Benedictines, sewn on four double sewing supports plus single supports (Kapitalbünde) at head and tail, the spine leather extending over the Kapitalbünde with perforated tabbed caps, an early textile ribbon bookmark knotted through one of the holes in the top extension, sides panelled with fillets, outer borders containing repeated impressions of small angled stick tools, large central panel with intersecting diagonal double fillets forming a saltire design, the interstices decorated with several tools including a rosette, palmette, quatrefoil, Ranke and star tool, evidence of removed center- and corner-pieces on both covers and of a parchment title label on upper cover, original small parchment label under the space for the title label with Lambach shelfmark "E.18" in red ink; two brass fore-edge catchplates on upper cover and two clasp-strap attachments on lower cover, the leather clasps fragmentary and lacking the metal hook clasps, the brass catchplates and one attachment stamped "Maria," plain endpapers, vellum manuscript spine liners from a fifteenth-century rubricated bible (see below), plain endpapers, later stencilled paper lettering piece on spine (rubbed, some scrapes, some worming, especially to lower cover). Provenance: Conrad Loher or Löher, 1499 presentation inscription to the Benedictines of Lambach: D[o]m[i]n[u]s Conradus Loher donauit hunc libru[m] Monasterio Lambacensi Anno d[omi]ni 1499; Lambach (Upper Austria), Benedictines, binding, shelfmark, inscribed identification of the work (full title and author) by the Lambach ?librarian on recto of initial blank leaf, with the number 37 in same hand; a couple of contemporary marginal notes in brown ink, a few manicules in outer margins in the same ink (ff. 14/6r, 27/7r, 28/5r, 29/2r, 30/6r, 31/4v, 31/5r and v); sold Hartung & Hartung, 14 May 2002, lot 150. *** The eighth of 24 known incunable editions of this popular collection of 50 Lenten sermons, and the first of three Koberger editions. The author is identified in the printed editions as Johannes Gritsch, or Grütsch, Professor of Theology (or Law) at Basel, but the true author, as shown by A. Murith in 1940, is now thought to have been Grütsch's brother Conrad, a Franciscan who served churches in Vienna, Zurich, and other locations in Alsace and Switzerland. Intended as a handbook for preachers, the sermons use exempla from the Bible and Church Fathers, as well as from secular medieval and classical sources, including Ovid, which may account for their huge popularity. The Verfasserlexikon notes the occasional use of Gerrman words and phrases in the Latin text. The work is organized by date, i,e., the Sundays throughout the year, and the 18-leaf subject Register of the two preliminary quires is keyed to both the Sunday (indicated by numbers in the headings and headlines) and the sections within each Sunday's sermon, which are indicated by letters. As these letters are buried in the text in this edition, the rubricator of this copy took care to lightly mark the letters in the outer margins to assist the reader. This very fine copy was probably rubricated and definitely bound in the monastic bindery of Lambach Abbey in Upper Austria, whose scriptorium was active from the 12th century. Lambach became a voracious buyer of books in the late 15th century, amassing a large number of printed books as well as manuscripts. A native of nearby Schwanenstadt, the local parish priest Conrad Loher or Löher (as spelled here) donated a group of manuscripts and printed books to the monastery in 1499. A number of these books were clearly bound in the monastic shop 20 or so years earlier, providing evidence that this large monastic bindery seems to have carried out work for customers outside the monastery (cf. Holter, p. 284). Similar inscriptions, all dated 1499, appear in the other books donated by Loher. The monastic inscription identifying the book, on the first blank leaf, appears to be in the same large rather spiky hand as the inscription in a Lambach incunable in the Morgan Library, PML 30218 (William of Ockham, In primum librum Sententiarum, [Urach: Conrad Fyner] 1483, Goff O-14). Approximately two-thirds of the Lambach books were later sold, or made their way to the Austrian National Library, mainly in the twentieth century. The tools on this binding, many first inventoried by Kurt Holter in 1954, are Einbanddatenbank s015770 (rhombus with four-petalled blossom), s015799 (little angled stick), s015776 (palmette), s015793 (6-pointed star), s015773 (rosette), s015782 (Ranke or leafy branch with fruits), s015769 (Steinbock or mountain goat), and s015800 (a tiny fleur-de-lis). Several impressions of one or two diamond-shaped tools are too rubbed to identify. The binding is noteworthy for the perforated extensions of the leather or skin of the spine at the head and tail, known as " tab caps" (see Ligatus, Language of Bindings website, http://www.ligatus.org.uk/lob/concept/3060), covering the Kapitalbünde (a distinctive feature of late 15th- and early 16th-century South German bookbindings). It appears that the perforations in the flaps may have been intended for other bookmarks, which would have made it easy for the reader to mark several pages at once. The textile bookmark attached to the top tabbed cap is "clearly early but looks to be an amateur addition making use of a convenient hole" (Nicholas Pickwoad, email correspondence) - our grateful thanks to Dr. Pickwoad for his invaluable comments on the binding material and structure. The Lambach monastic bindery regularly dismembered old manuscripts from the Abbey scriptorium and re-used them in bindings. Many fragments of older Lambach manuscripts have been recorded, including those held by the Beinecke Library, the subject of an exhibition in 1993 (cf. Babcock, Reconstructing a medieval library: fragments from Lambach, New Haven, 1993). In the present example, the vellum spine liner is from a fifteenth-century folio manuscript Bible in a large gothic hand, in 32 lines (recto and verso), a few lines being apparently commentary in smaller script, this leaf from Genesis 42.13-14. The strip at the front of the text block is blank, being from the margin, the strip visible at the end of the text block has the beginnings of the lines of the recto side and ends of the lines of the verso. On the recto are 5 decorated initials of which 4 in alternating red and blue with contrasting filigree infill. Goff G-494; BMC II 417 (with erroneous date 26 Feb. 1479); GW 11545. On Gritsch cf.Verfasserlexikon2 3:291-294; on the binding and provenance cf. Kurt Holter, "Zum gotischen Bucheinband in

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books]
 13.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


         Mammotrectus super Bibliam

      Venice: Nicolaus Jenson, 1479. 4to (212 x 146 mm). Collation: A10 B-C8; a-y8 1-68 710 (A1 blank, A2r-C8v subject index; a1r author's prologue, a1r-7/9v text, colophon on 7/9v, 7/10r-v table of contents). [260] leaves. Double column, 38 lines and headline. Types: 3:106G (headlines and openings of each book), 6:84(75)G (text). Capital spaces with guide letters. Rubricated: pearled Lombard initials in red, some with extenders, many with additional (slightly later?) black penwork infill, capital strokes and paragraph marks in red. A contemporary supplementary manuscript register of Biblical names on recto of blank leaf A1, neatly written in two columns; contemporary manuscript foliation (1-234), leaf numbers added to the table, and a few marginal notes, all in the same hand. A few mostly marginal wormholes in first few quires, more worming in last few quires, light marginal dampstaining to last 8 or so leaves, a couple of red smudges (rubricator's?) on r5v and y8r. Large copy, preserving some deckle edges. Binding: Contemporary South German or Austrian dark brown blind-stamped calf over wooden boards, covers with large central panel outlined by triple fillets and with intersecting fillets forming a saltire design, outer borders stamped with a repeated Maria banderole tool, the compartments of the panel stamped with two sizes of rosettes, a fleur-de-lis, a circular ihs tool, a three-leaved plant, a teardrop-shaped dragon tool, drawer-handle tool and larger leafy plant tool; ten incised and embossed brass corner-and centerpiece bosses, two brass fore-edge clasps and catches, the leather renewed, spine with banderole tools, with erroneous 19th-century paper label "S. Hieronym Expositio antiqua," 5 red-dyed parchment index tabs, quire liners of manuscript waste; spine rubbed, leather abraded at head and tail exposing endbands, oversewn with later thread, woming, especially to lower cover (possibly recased but apparently not a remboîtage, the worming in the inner covers matching the text block). Modern linen folding case. Provenance: contemporary manuscript imprecation against thieves on front pastedown, manuscript register and annotations as described above. *** A fine copy of Jenson's edition of this important Franciscan Biblical and liturgical aid, popular in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, containing hundreds of short entries providing etymological and grammatical explanations of terms found in the Vulgate and in liturgy. Written between 1279 and 1297, by Giovanni Marchesino, a friar from Reggio Emilia, the Mammotrectus was "maternal milk" for the uneducated clergy (the term had been used by Augustine in his Commentary on the Psalms). Using synonyms and paraphrases, Marchesino taught barely literate priests how to pronounce the Latin words from the Bible which they read aloud and sang in Church, what the words meant, and how to use them in sentences. The first and longest part, arranged in order of the books of the Bible, from Genesis to Apocalypse, provides definitions, etymology, pronunciation and declensions of difficult words. This is followed by sections on the Psalms, the Lives of the Saints, basic Biblical exegesis, information on Hebrew festivals and customs, and extensive explanations of liturgical texts, including antiphons and responses, Eucharistic prayers, hymns, and sermons for every day of the ecclesiastical calendar. Packed with information, the work remained for two hundred years "the chief manual for poorly-educated priests" (Moss). It was used by young friars, who needed to master the Biblical texts and to use them in preaching. A third part, found in some manuscripts but apparently not in the printed tradition, contained an explanation of the Franciscan rule and papal bulls related to the order. Twenty-three surviving 15th-century editions were followed by only a handful of editions in the early sixteenth century, by which time the Mammotrectus had become on object of derision on the part of the Reformists, for whom it was perhaps an unwelcome reminder of the ignorance of the clergy. Jenson's edition essentially reprinted the 1478 edition of Renner and Bartua (Goff M238). The omitted line and a half at the end of the second column on y8v appears to have been printed in this copy (not stamped in, as in British Library copy, IA. 197929). Quire 1 is here correctly printed (cf. BMC). The owner of this attractive copy supplied his own supplemental index of names. I have not been able to identify the binding shop; the tools are not reproduced in the Einbanddatenbank, Kyriss, or Schunke Schwenke Sammlung. Goff M-239; CIBN M-124; Walsh 1593, 1594; ; BMC V 180; BSB-Ink M-158; GW M20819. Cf. Ann Moss, "Latin Liturgical Hymns and their Early Printing History 1470-1520," Humanistica Lovaniensia, 36 (1987), 112-37, esp. p. 118; Frans van Liere, "Marchesino da Reggio (Giovanni Marchesini)", Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 69 (2007).

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
 14.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Historia Naturalis. Edited by Philippus Beroaldus

      1479. Roman type, double column, 50 lines per page. Numerous initials & rubrics supplied in red & blue alternately, illuminated with 37 large initials in gold and colors, and a painted border heightened with gold & including a coat of arms on fol. 23. 358 leaves (without first and final blank). Folio (298 x 206 mm.), Italian 17th-century brown morocco (some worming to spine, some wear to joints & top of binding), covers richly gilt with three different borders with floral tools and rosettes at the corners, the second frame decorated with tools forming fans in the corners, in the centre an empty shield formed of two fillets enclosing a painted brown listel with gilt dots, all surrounded by small tools and helmet on top, a.e.g. Treviso: Michael Manzolus, "25 August 1479" [but not before 13 October]. Sixth Latin edition, the second edited by Filippo Beroaldo, of the greatest general scientific and encyclopedic work of antiquity, a storehouse of physical, geographical, and historical knowledge which profoundly affected the Western world's thought for more than 1500 years. It deals with mathematics, physics, geography, astronomy, medicine, physiology, zoology, botany, geology, mineralogy, anthropology, philosophy, history, agriculture, the arts and letters, etc. The Historia naturalis was especially popular among the humanists. One of them was the philologist Filippo Beroaldo the Elder (1453-1505), the most important exponent of humanism in Bologna. He taught rhetoric and poetry at the University of Bologna, and he edited and commented the works of numerous classical authors, as for example, Apuleius, Suetonius, Aulus Gellius, Propertius, and others. The edition of Pliny's Historia naturalis is one of his first major works, first published in Parma 1476 by Stephanus Corallus. The present edition, printed at Treviso by Michele Manzolo or Manzolinus (born in Parma 1420-ca. 1482), is a reprint from the Parma edition. However, it contains on the first two leaves an Apologia of Pliny and a poem by Filippo Beroaldo that are not to be found in earlier editions. The colophon is dated 25 Aug. 1479 but the poem (fol. a3v) is dated "Tarvisii tertio idus Octobres Mcccclxxix" (13 October 1479). ILLUMINATION: Our copy has been splendidly illuminated by a contemporary Italian artist in the distinct tradition of Italian humanist manuscripts of the 15th century, with letters surrounded by "white vine scroll," a form of interlacing plant scroll in which emphasis is on the branch, not on the leaves. The finely drawn and colored decoration comprises an initial with a full border on leaf c1, the beginning of Pliny's text (Book II), and 36 large initials opening the other books. The elaborate border is composed of intricate white vine-scroll on red and green grounds on a blue surround with white triple dots. The lower border incorporating a coat of arms painted on a blue ground with a green frame; it shows a black eagle on gold ground above a red and white (silver) checkerboard pattern (see our Provenance note). The large initials in burnished gold are decorated in the same style, several with extensions into the margins. Interestingly, this decoration is found in several Bolognese manuscripts and incunabula in the period of 1468 until 1500 (see for several examples: Guernelli 2006). Could it be that the editor Beroaldo was somehow instrumental in the link between Treviso, where the book was printed and his hometown Bologna, where the decoration was added? PROVENANCE: The coat of arms inserted in the border on the beginning of Pliny's text shows a black imperial eagle or surmounting chequy argent gule. These are the arms of the counts Ottoni, rulers of Matelica, near Macerata (The Marches). Members of this celebrated Italian family excelled, with the papal army, at the wars of the Papal State against the Italian states and foreign powers. In particular, the illumination of the present Historia naturalis might have been made for Alessandro Ottoni (d. 1485). Count Alessandro, "saggio e magnifico sovrano," was captain of the papal army in the wars against Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta and the king of Naples. He was a patron of the arts and crafts, builder of churches and Renaissance monuments at Matelica, and restored ancient buildings of that town. Although the edition is represented quite frequently in public collections, it is extremely rare on the market. Only one other copy is listed in ABPC (1975-2013), sold at auction in 1984. A fine and large copy with wide margins. First three leaves reinforced at the gutter, some worming to first and last few leaves, some minor thumbing and staining, light water-staining in outer margins of nine last quires.Some worming to spine, damages at joints and top of binding. We kindly thank D. Guernelli for information on the decoration. ❧ Goff P-791. Klebs 786.6. On the Ottoni family see: R.W. Lightbown, Carlo Crivelli, Yale 2004, p. 473f. On the illumination see: Daniele Guernelli, "Note per una tipologia umanistica bolognese." in: Schede Umanistiche, no. 1 (2006), pp. 21-42.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc. ]
 15.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         Der heiligen Leben ] Der Hochen vntailbarlichen Tryfaltikayt zu lob Marie wirdigsten Junckfrawen vñ müter vnsers herren Jesu Christi zueren vnd allen hayligen vnd den Christnmenschen zu hayl ... der hayligen lebñ ... das Summertayl. Beigebunden: Das Passional oder der Hayligen Leben .... Winterteil, Augsburg 1518

      Bll. 25 - 148(XXV - CXLVIII) Bll. + 1 Bl. Registerl./ beigeb.: Bll.: 1 - 155 (I - CLV)[von 172 Bll.] ca. 25 Bll. mit teilweisem Textverlust, handwerklich sauber, aber nicht hochwertig restauriert. (wahrscheinlich erst in der. 2. Hälfte des 20. Jh.) Bei der neuen Bindung Bll. teilweise oben kapp beschnitten, ohne Textverlust im Blocksatz. Bll. teilw. altersbed. fleckig. Mit 215 Holzschnitten im Text (ca. 8,5 x 8,5 cm) 27 x 18 cm Blattgröße in Halbleinenband des 20. Jh. VD16 H 1479

      [Bookseller: REDIVIVUS Antiquariat & Buchhandlung]
 16.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


         Liber de vita Christi ac pontificum omnium. [Vitae pontificum].

      Fol. 128 nn. Bll. (Got. Typ., 2 Kol., 54-55 Zeilen), Späterer Ldr.-Bd. (wohl des 18. Jhds.) m. goldgepr. Deckelbordüren, Rückenverg. u. goldgepr. rotem Rückenschild. Erste in Deutschland gedruckte Ausgabe, zuvor wohl nur einmal (1479 in Venedig) gedruckt. - Mit einem Vorwort des Autors an Papst Sixtus IV. sowie mit einem Widmungsbrief an den Autor von Hieronymus Squarzaficus. - Sehr frühe Ausgabe dieses überaus beliebten Werkes Platinas (Bartholomaeus Sacchi aus Piadena, d. i. Platina bei Cremona) über das Leben der Päpste, das noch bis ins 18. Jahrhundert wiederholt gedruckt wurde. Ab 1475 Präfekt der vatikanischen Bibliothek griff Platina für die ältere Papstgeschichte auf überlieferte Quellen zurück, für die Zeit von Eugen IV. bis Paul II. konnte er sich auf Augenzeugen und eigene Erfahrungen stützen. - Einband etw. beschabt u. bestoßen. Rücken unter Verwendung alten Materials erneuert. Innendeckel m. altem Eintrag u. gest. Exlibris (Theodore Low De Vinne Mitbegründer des Grolier Clubs). Vorsatzbl. m. altem bibliogr. Eintrag. Das erste Bl. auf der leeren Vorderseite m. kl. zeitgen. Besitzvermerk, m. gekl. Einriß u. mit ergänzter Randfehlstelle im Bug oben (dadurch wenige Zeilen mit min. Textverlust). Durchgehend von alter Hand an der oberen Ecke paginiert und ebenso mit alter Durchnummerierung der Papstviten. Wenige Bll. mit Unterstreichungen bzw. kl. Marginalien von alter Hand bzw. kl. Wurmspuren im unteren weißen Rand. Vereinzelt schwach gebräunt, fleckig bzw. wasserrandig, sonst innen sauberes u. besonders seitlich u. unten breitrandiges Exemplar. - Hain/C. 13047 GW M33881 BMC II, 420 Goff P-769 BSB, Inkunabeln P-566 Hase, Koberger 446, 50.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
 17.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


         Allzeitfertiger Hauß-Verwalter, Worinnen ein Garten-, Koch-, Condir- und Distillir-, Wie auch Artzney-Buch. Allen Hauß-Vätern, Hauß-Müttern, Verwaltern, Pachtern, Gärtnern, Köchen, Kellnern, Distillirern und andern curieusen Liebhabern zu grossen Nutzen mit sonderbahren Fleiß, auch seinen Figuren, Vorrede und Registern ausgefertiget. 3 Teile und Anhang in 1 Band.

      6 Bll., 360 S. 1 Bl., 128 S. 105 (1) S., 22 Bll. 16 S. Mit 1 Holzschnitt-Frontispiz zum Arzneibuch und 32 Textholzschnitten. Halblederband im Stil der Zeit. Jöcher II, 1479. Weiss 3497 (Kochbuch). Enthält in 3, jeweils mit eigenen Titeln versehenen Teilen, ein Hausvater-, ein Koch- u. ein Arzneibuch. Durchgehend schwach gebräunt bzw. stockfleckig.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Müller & Gräff e.K.]
 18.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


         Historia Naturalis

      Edited by Philippus Beroaldus. Roman type, double column, 50 lines per page. Numerous initials & rubrics supplied in red & blue alternately, illuminated with 37 large initials in gold and colors, and a painted border heightened with gold & including a coat of arms on fol. 23. 358 leaves (without first and final blank). Folio (298 x 206 mm.), Italian 17th-century brown morocco (some worming to spine, some wear to joints & top of binding), covers richly gilt with three different borders with floral tools and rosettes at the corners, the second frame decorated with tools forming fans in the corners, in the centre an empty shield formed of two fillets enclosing a painted brown listel with gilt dots, all surrounded by small tools and helmet on top, a.e.g. Treviso: Michael Manzolus, "25 August 1479" [but not before 13 October]. Sixth Latin edition, the second edited by Filippo Beroaldo, of the greatest general scientific and encyclopedic work of antiquity, a storehouse of physical, geographical, and historical knowledge which profoundly affected the Western world's thought for more than 1500 years. It deals with mathematics, physics, geography, astronomy, medicine, physiology, zoology, botany, geology, mineralogy, anthropology, philosophy, history, agriculture, the arts and letters, etc. The Historia naturalis was especially popular among the humanists. One of them was the philologist Filippo Beroaldo the Elder (1453-1505), the most important exponent of humanism in Bologna. He taught rhetoric and poetry at the University of Bologna, and he edited and commented the works of numerous classical authors, as for example, Apuleius, Suetonius, Aulus Gellius, Propertius, and others. The edition of Pliny's Historia naturalis is one of his first major works, first published in Parma 1476 by Stephanus Corallus. The present edition, printed at Treviso by Michele Manzolo or Manzolinus (born in Parma 1420-ca. 1482), is a reprint from the Parma edition. However, it contains on the first two leaves an Apologia of Pliny and a poem by Filippo Beroaldo that are not to be found in earlier editions. The colophon is dated 25 Aug. 1479 but the poem (fol. a3v) is dated "Tarvisii tertio idus Octobres Mcccclxxix" (13 October 1479).ILLUMINATION: Our copy has been splendidly illuminated by a contemporary Italian artist in the distinct tradition of Italian humanist manuscripts of the 15th century, with letters surrounded by "white vine scroll," a form of interlacing plant scroll in which emphasis is on the branch, not on the leaves. The finely drawn and colored decoration comprises an initial with a full border on leaf c1, the beginning of Pliny's text (Book II), and 36 large initials opening the other books. The elaborate border is composed of intricate white vine-scroll on red and green grounds on a blue surround with white triple dots. The lower border incorporating a coat of arms painted on a blue ground with a green frame; it shows a black eagle on gold ground above a red and white (silver) checkerboard pattern (see our Provenance note). The large initials in burnished gold are decorated in the same style, several with extensions into the margins. Interestingly, this decoration is found in several Bolognese manuscripts and incunabula in the period of 1468 until 1500 (see for several examples: Guernelli 2006). Could it be that the editor Beroaldo was somehow instrumental in the link between Treviso, where the book was printed and his hometown Bologna, where the decoration was added?PROVENANCE: The coat of arms inserted in the border on the beginning of Pliny's text shows a black imperial eagle or surmounting chequy argent gule. These are the arms of the counts Ottoni, rulers of Matelica, near Macerata (The Marches). Members of this celebrated Italian family excelled, with the papal army, at the wars of the Papal State against the Italian states and foreign powers. In particular, the illumination of the present Historia naturalis might have been made for Alessandro Ottoni (d. 1485). Count Alessandro, "saggio e magnifico sovrano," was captain of the papal army in the wars against Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta and the king of Naples. He was a patron of the arts and crafts, builder of churches and Renaissance monuments at Matelica, and restored ancient buildings of that town. Although the edition is represented quite frequently in public collections, it is extremely rare on the market. Only one other copy is listed in ABPC (1975-2013), sold at auction in 1984. A fine and large copy with wide margins. First three leaves reinforced at the gutter, some worming to first and last few leaves, some minor thumbing and staining, light water-staining in outer margins of nine last quires. Some worming to spine, damages at joints and top of binding. We kindly thank D. Guernelli for information on the decoration. ? Goff P-791. Klebs 786.6. On the Ottoni family see: R.W. Lightbown, Carlo Crivelli, Yale 2004, p. 473f. On the illumination see: Daniele Guernelli, "Note per una tipologia umanistica bolognese." in: Schede Umanistiche, no. 1 (2006), pp. 21-42.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
 19.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Illuminiertes Breviermanuskript.

      [Wohl Österreich], February-Mai 1479.] - Lateinische Handschrift auf Pergament. 540 Bll. (in Tinte foliiert 1-77, in Bleistift bis 210 fortgesetzt, danach nur sporadisch und fehlerhaft). Vollständig bis auf das letzte Blatt (wenn kein Kalender beigebunden war): i-ix10, x8, xi-xxxiv10, xxxv6 (von 10, vii-x ausgeschieden), xxxvi-xxxviii10, xxxix12, xl-xliv10, xlv-li8, lii9 (+ ix), liii11 (+ i), liv-lv10, lvi8. In Tinte auf 31-32 bzw. 42-44 Zln. regliert (Bll. 434-499v). Wohl von mehreren Händen; ausführliche Rubriken in rot. Mit 10 illuminierten Initialen im Psalter, 10zlg. illuminierten Initialen mit Blattwerkseinfassung (darunter ein Vogel) und 9 ähnlichen, kleineren Initialen. Pergament des 17. Jhs. über blindgepr. Holzdeckeln; 2 Schließen; Griffregister. 8vo (155 x 110 mm). Die attraktiven illuminierten Initialen, vorwiegend im ersten Teil des Bandes zu finden, sind typische Produkte einer österreichischen oder bayerischen Werkstatt; die meisten zeigen hochpoliertes Blattgold und ein charakteristisches blasses Grün und Rosa. Die größte Initiale weist konventionelle Blattwerksdekoration auf, besticht jedoch durch die naturalistische Rose und den Vogel am unteren Rand. - Inhalt: Ferialpsalter Bll. 1-77v; Hymnar Bll. 78-94 (mit dem Hl. Kilian Bl. 87 und der Hl. Ursula Bl. 90); Gebete Bll. 94v-7v; Temporale Bll. 98- 339v, mit weißer Seite 321v und Evangeliumslesungen für die Sonntage Bll. 322-339v; Rubriken für das Sanctorale (am Schluß getilgter Text und Stege entnommener Blätter) Bll. 340-342v; Sanctorale Bll. 343-499v, mit dem Hochfest des Hl. Augustinus als "summum festum" Bl. 458, seine Translatio als "medium festum" 477v; weiße Seite 500r/v; Commune Sanctorum und Kirchenwidmung Bll. 501-536; Gebete, darunter mehrere für den Hl. Augustinus und den Evangelisten Johannes Bll. 536v-538; zusätzliche liturgische Elemente am vorderen Vorsatz sowie zusätzliche Gebete, darunter für Johannes "apostolo et patrono" und Augustinus Bl. 538r/v. - Zwei Kolophone datiert Montag, 8. Februar 1479 und 19. Mai 1479 (Bll. 499v und 538). Demnach anscheinend geschrieben für ein dem Evangelisten Johannes gewidmetes Augustinerkloster ("sanctissimi patris nostri Augustini", f. 458, "patris nostri et patroni", f. 398); die Heiligen im Sanctorale weisen auf einen Ursprung im südöstlichen Deutschland oder - wahrscheinlicher - nortwestlichen Österreich, so etwa der Hl. Florian mit 9 Lektionen und vollem Offizium (Bl. 397), der Hl. Ulrich (vor allem in Augsburg und Salzburg verehrt), Bl. 434, der Hl. Koloman (dessen Zentren der Verehrung in Melk, Wien und Linz lagen), Bl. 478v, sowie des Hl. Virgil von Salzburg, f. 499v. Zahlreiche Nachträge belegen den fortgesetzten Gebrauch bis ins 17. Jahrhundert. Aus der Bibliothek auf Schloß Jegenstorf bei Bern; später versteigert bei Klipstein & Kornfeld (13.-15. Nov. 1947, Nr. 345). - Einige wenige Bll. eingerissen (ohne Textverlust). Einband an den Ecken etwas bestoßen; Vordergelenk angeplatzt. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
 20.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         Commentarius in primum librum Sententiarum Petri Lombardi

      [Strassburg: Printer of Henricus Ariminensis (Type 2), 1479. Royal folio (401 x 278 mm). Collation: [a-c10 d8 e6 f-h10 i4 k-m10 n8 o-q10 r8 s10; t4]. 168 leaves, [a]1 and [t]3-4 blank. 62 lines, double column. Type 2:93. Nine- to two-line initial spaces. Rubricated in red: pearled Lombard capitals, headlines, chapter numbers, paragraph marks and capital strokes. Paper: at least 3 different paper stocks with watermarks of 8-petalled daisies, diameters 55, 45, 36 mm.; the same paper was used by the binder for the three blank leaves at front and four at back and for the pastedowns. A vertical impression between the text columns is visible in the last 20 or so leaves, with a small round impression at each end. Minor dampstaining in quire 13 and to final text leaf (s10). Manuscript quiring in center of lower margins, guides to headlines for rubricators in extreme upper margins (most of both cropped but a few preserved). Binding: contemporary blind-stamped alum-tawed pigskin over part-bevelled wooden boards, from the "Phönix" workshop (Kyriss 162), covers panelled with triple fillets forming compartments, the two covers differently laid out but both with repeated impressions of Maria banderole, Phoenix, Agnus Dei and cross-hatched quatrefoil tools, and, on the front cover, two central rows of a repeated rectangular tool with animals. Two brass fore-edge clasps and catchplates with incised lettering. Quire liners and spine liners from a manuscript on vellum. 19th-century library shelfmark stencilled on spine. Covers rubbed and with some wormholes. Provenance: occasional contemporary marginal corrections or one-word notes; Hilprand Brandenburg (d. 1514), hand-colored armorial woodcut bookplate (Warnecke 245), showing an angel holding aloft a shield with his arms: azure, a bull passant argent; given to the Carthusians at Buxheim, and probably bound for him; contemporary ex-dono inscription in the hand of the prior, Jakob Louber (Liber Cartusiensium in Buchshaim prope Memmingen proveniens a confratre nostro domino Hilprando Brandenburg de Bibraco, donato sacerdote, continens Bonaventuram super primo libro sententiarum / Oretur pro eo et pro quibus desideravit), contents note (titulus) at top also in Louber's hand, later Buxheim inkstamp rather tastelessly stamped in the center of opening rubricated initial on first page; Graf von Otstein; Graf Hugo von Waldbott-Bassenheim, sale, Munich (Carl Förster), 20 September 1883; Estelle Doheny, her gift to St.Mary of the Barren's, Perryville, Missouri (sale, Christie's NY, 14 December 2001, lot 40, to): Joseph A. Freilich (sale, Sotheby's NY, 13 December 2002, lot 15).*** First edition of any of Bonaventura's commentaries on the first book of Peter Lombard's four-part theological handbook, a very fine copy from the library of Hilprand Brandenburg, bound in his customary bindery, with his celebrated woodcut bookplate and the inscription of Jakob Louber, librarian of the Carthusians of Basel, recording the donation of the book to the library. The Sentences of the 12th-century scholastic theologian Peter Lombard, Bishop of Paris, remained the most oft-consulted and influential of all such systematic compilations and expositions of theological texts from the Bible and the church fathers, especially Augustine, for three centuries. "By the time Bonaventura was at the University of Paris, it had become the custom for bachelors seeking the masters in theology (the medieval university's highest degree) to comment on the Lombard," who was known as the "magister" (C. Cullen, Bonaventura [2006], p. 15). Bonaventura's commentaries on the Sentences are considered his most important theological and philosophical work. His commentaries on Book II were first printed in Treviso by Hermann Liechtenstein in 1477. Three different types and groups of books were assigned to the rubric "Printer of 'Henricus Arminensis'. Those of type 1 are now thought to have been printed by Heinrich Eggestein, and those of type 3 by Georg Reyser, but the Type 2 books have yet to be assigned to any known Strassburg printer: cf. Needham and de Marez Oyens, The Estelle Doheny Collection, part 1, lot 19. Of the 450 books recorded in the benefactor's book at Buxheim as a record of Hilprand Brandenburg's donation to Buxheim, fully 26 were printed in Strassburg. Many of his books were bound in a single shop, some of whose tools were attributed by Kyriss to the Weissenau Praemonstratian convent, and others to a workshop he dubbed the "Phoenix," localizing it to Biberach or Memmingen precisely because of the connection with Hilprand. It is likely that there was in fact only a single shop. The tools on this binding, of which the first four reproduced by Kyriss, are Einbanddatenbank S001534: 4-pointed hatched shape, stamped to create a field of petals; s001529: Agnus Dei; s001523: phoenix; s001533: Maria banderole; and s001458: a rectangular tool with two animals. Goff B-870; H 3536*; BMC I, 80 CIBN B-625; Bod-inc B-423; BSB-Ink B-657; GW 4656. On the binding see E. Kyriss, Verzierte gotische Einbände im alten deutschen Sprachgebiet (1951-58), no. 162 (pp. 129-130, pl. 325). On Hilprand Brandenburg, see, among other articles, Victor Scholderer, "Hilprand Brandenburg and his books," in Fifty Essays in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century Bibliography (Amsterdam 1966), 219-223; Paul Needham, "The Library of Hilprand Brandenburg," Bibliothek und Wissenschaft 29 (1996), pp. 95-125, and "Thirteen More Books from the library of Hilprand Branbenburg," Einbandforschung 4 (Feb. 1999), 23-25; Eric M. White, "Three Books Donated by Adolf Rusch to the Carthusians at Basel," Gutenberg-Jahrbuch 81 (2006), 231-235; Oliver Auge, "Frömmigkeit, Bildung, Bücherliebe Konstanten im Leben des Buxheimer Kartäusers Hilprand Brandenburg (1442-1514)," in Bücher, Bibliotheken und Schriftkultur der Kartäuser (Tübingen 2002), 399-422.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
 21.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Il Driadeo d'Amore. (In fine, colophon:) Florentie, (Nicolaus Laurentii Alamanus), die tertia Aprelis M.CCCC.LXXVIIII. (Firenze, 1479)

      Alamanus, 1479. in - 8, ff. 58 (i primi due ff., con la dedica, sono stati ricomposti tipograficamente nell'Ottocento): già nel XIX secolo era talmente raro da obbligare a ricomporre 2 fogli per completarlo. Legatura in marocchino granata con decoraz. oro, filetto ai piatti, tagli dor., dent. int., titolo al dorso (bound by Lloyd).(questo esemplare apparve nella vendita Hoepli, 23 - 28 aprile 1923). Prima edizione di mitica rarità del ''Driadeo d'amore'', dedicato dall'autore nel 1465 a Lorenzo de' Medici. Si tratta di un poema mitologico in ottava rima, celebre per aver fatto parte della biblioteca di Leonardo da Vinci. La scena è ambientata sui monti Calvanei nel Mugello, avvicinabile per l'argomento al Ninfale Fiesolano del Boccaccio. Racconta l'amore del satiro Severe per la ninfa Lora, come Diana lo trasformò in un liocorno, e come fu ferito dalla stessa Lora, nel fiume Sieve, e come poi la ninfa fosse tramutata nel fiume Lora, che si confonde col Sieve. Luca Pulci (Firenze 1431, morto in prigione per debiti a Roma nel 1470) fu fratello del più noto Luigi, che probabilmente lo aiutò a stilare il Driadeo. ''La comica vicenda narrata da Severe nel secondo libro del Driadeo è il celebre Anfitrione di Plauto. Il testo plautino, com'è noto, conobbe un'ininterrotta fortuna nel medioevo e nel Rinascimento'' (Lanza pp. 110 - 36). Testo poetico in volgare in edizione censita in sole quattro biblioteche nel mondo (Manchester, Harvard, Firenze Nazionale e Riccardiana). Ottimo esemplare (ex collezione Martini), malgrado la mancanza iniziale.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Pregliasco]
 22.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


         Historia Ecclesiastica

      Mantua: Johannes Schallus, 1479. Hardcover. Good+. [Mantua: Johannes Schallus, [not before 15] July 1479]. Folio (286 x 202mm). 34 lines, Roman letter with catchwords, initials printed with guide letters and supplied in red and brown ink by a contemporary hand. Most engaging is the extensive Latin marginalia in brown and red ink written in a humanistic script. In this copy, an early annotator made ample references to biblical figures from the Old and New Testaments and extracted names of Roman emperors, philosophers, and early church fathers. The system seems to highlight the major figures of the Eusebius?' passages by name and enters them in the margin for easy reference. This is also done for scenes and major historical events, written in abbreviated Latin for space. The majority of the inscriptions are written in an attractive red ink and date to probably the beginning of the sixteenth century. 166 (of 172) leaves, 133 are bound and 33 leaves loose and starting on page three of the table of contents (lacking some preliminary material: initial blank, Gonzaga?'s address, start of contents which are pp. 1-5, also 14-15 (last page of contents), and pp. 16-19 (prologue and incipit pages), loose leaves starting again on p. 20 in Book I and lacking p. 37 (beginning of Book III) and the final blank). Bound section beginning on p. 42 in Book III; leaves 48-49 and 164-66 bound between leaves 41 and 42. Modern alum-tawed leather; (loose leaves slightly thumbsoiled and dampstained, contents of bound volume washed with residual soiling on first and last pages, last leaf rehinged with edges silked, margins trimmed close on some pages; linen folding case). Late nineteenth-century ownership stamp of Chaplain Luke V. McCabe, bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of Pennsylvania. McCabe likely rebound the book and probably misplaced the front loose leaves as they did not make it into the volume; a significant portion of the text is present though. Fifteenth-century Mantuan edition of this most famous work on church history from apostolic times to the mid-fourth century by Eusebius, also known as the ?"Father of Church History,?" the work is derived from the Latin translation by Rufinus of Aquileia (345-410). The eager student of this book devoured the contents and filled every margin of every page with reminders of Eusebius?' content; the annotations are a veritable ?"who?'s who?" in the text from the point of view of an early modern reader. This is a fine Mantuan early printing by Joannes Schallus, who also took the title ?"doctor artis Apollinee.?" Works from the Schallus press were known for their great beauty and elegant production. The printed types are a mixture of those used in the early Milan and Parma presses, but were notably taller. Mittarelli observed in his Annals that Schallus was unaware of the previous impressions of 1474 and 1476 as his preface wrongly states he was the first the rescue the author from the ?"dust and obscurity of antiquity.?" Though, it is not known if Schallus had consulted any unknown or now lost manuscripts by Rufinus, which would make this edition the more celebrated. This edition contains eleven books, not nine, as the previous version. A Greek version of the original text would not appear until 1544, nearly sixty-five years later. This was an important reference work for late medieval theologians as the sources Eusebius used to write the history were not readily available or lost to time. This copy retains a near complete portion of the text and is most interesting for its studious inscriptions. ISTC ie00127000. Fifteenth-century Mantuan edition of this most famous work on church history from apostolic times to the mid-fourth century by Eusebius, also known as the ?"Father of Church History,?" the work is derived from the Latin translation by Rufinus of Aquileia (345-410). The eager student of this book devoured the contents and filled every margin of every page with reminders of Eusebius?' content; the annotations are a veritable ?"who?'s who?" in the text from the point of view of an early modern reader. This is a fine Mantuan early printing by Joannes Schallus, who also took the title ?"doctor artis Apollinee.?" Works from the Schallus press were known for their great beauty and elegant production. The printed types are a mixture of those used in the early Milan and Parma presses, but were notably taller. Mittarelli observed in his Annals that Schallus was unaware of the previous impressions of 1474 and 1476 as his preface wrongly states he was the first the rescue the author from the ?"dust and obscurity of antiquity.?" Though, it is not known if Schallus had consulted any unknown or now lost manuscripts by Rufinus, which would make this edition the more celebrated. This edition contains eleven books, not nine, as the previous version. A Greek version of the original text would not appear until 1544, nearly sixty-five years later. This was an important reference work for late medieval theologians as the sources Eusebius used to write the history were not readily available or lost to time. This copy retains a near complete portion of the text and is most interesting for its studious inscriptions. ISTC ie00127000.

      [Bookseller: Sanctuary Books]
 23.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Opera

      Venice: Andreas de Paltasichis and Boninus de Boninis, de Ragusia, 1479 12 March 1479. Collation: a10; b-d8; e10; f-m8; M8; N6; n-r8; s-t6; u8; x8; y6; z8; &8; (1); (8); Blank. Blue and red initials, contemporary notes on the margins, some restore on the inner margins of some leaves. New blind-stamped binding with brass clasps and brass book corner (front and back). SUPERB BINDING!!!! Acid-free clamshell box. The date in the colophon is printed "1478". As Mocenigo did not become Doge until 18 May 1478 there must be an error in this date. Contents: De divinis institutionibus; De ira dei; De opificio dei vel de formatione hominis; De phoenice carmen. Epitome divinarum institutionum [cap. LVI-LXXIII]. Venantius Fortunatus: De resurrectione Christi. Goff L8 ; HC 9813; BMC V 251 ; BSB-Ink L-8. PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

      [Bookseller: Louis Caron]
 24.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Fernziel: Schwarzes Meer Der Landser, Erlebnisberichte zur Geschichte des Zweiten Weltkrieges Band 1479

      Rastatt Erich Pabel Verlag,. 66 S. Kl.-8°, geh. Gut erhaltenes Exemplar. Seiten alters- und papierbedingt leicht gebräunt, Band 1479 K15178.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Buchhandel Daniel Viertel Ei]
 25.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         Historia Naturalis

      Edited by Philippus Beroaldus. Roman type, double column, 50 lines per page. Numerous initials & rubrics supplied in red & blue alternately, illuminated with 37 large initials in gold and colors, and a painted border heightened with gold & including a coat of arms on fol. 23. 358 leaves (without first and final blank). Folio (298 x 206 mm.), Italian 17th-century brown morocco (some worming to spine, some wear to joints & top of binding), covers richly gilt with three different borders with floral tools and rosettes at the corners, the second frame decorated with tools forming fans in the corners, in the centre an empty shield formed of two fillets enclosing a painted brown listel with gilt dots, all surrounded by small tools and helmet on top, a.e.g. Treviso: Michael Manzolus, "25 August 1479" [but not before 13 October]. Sixth Latin edition, the second edited by Filippo Beroaldo, of the greatest general scientific and encyclopedic work of antiquity, a storehouse of physical, geographical, and historical knowledge which profoundly affected the Western world's thought for more than 1500 years. It deals with mathematics, physics, geography, astronomy, medicine, physiology, zoology, botany, geology, mineralogy, anthropology, philosophy, history, agriculture, the arts and letters, etc. The Historia naturalis was especially popular among the humanists. One of them was the philologist Filippo Beroaldo the Elder (1453-1505), the most important exponent of humanism in Bologna. He taught rhetoric and poetry at the University of Bologna, and he edited and commented the works of numerous classical authors, as for example, Apuleius, Suetonius, Aulus Gellius, Propertius, and others. The edition of Pliny's Historia naturalis is one of his first major works, first published in Parma 1476 by Stephanus Corallus. The present edition, printed at Treviso by Michele Manzolo or Manzolinus (born in Parma 1420-ca. 1482), is a reprint from the Parma edition. However, it contains on the first two leaves an Apologia of Pliny and a poem by Filippo Beroaldo that are not to be found in earlier editions. The colophon is dated 25 Aug. 1479 but the poem (fol. a3v) is dated "Tarvisii tertio idus Octobres Mcccclxxix" (13 October 1479).ILLUMINATION: Our copy has been splendidly illuminated by a contemporary Italian artist in the distinct tradition of Italian humanist manuscripts of the 15th century, with letters surrounded by "white vine scroll," a form of interlacing plant scroll in which emphasis is on the branch, not on the leaves. The finely drawn and colored decoration comprises an initial with a full border on leaf c1, the beginning of Pliny's text (Book II), and 36 large initials opening the other books. The elaborate border is composed of intricate white vine-scroll on red and green grounds on a blue surround with white triple dots. The lower border incorporating a coat of arms painted on a blue ground with a green frame; it shows a black eagle on gold ground above a red and white (silver) checkerboard pattern (see our Provenance note). The large initials in burnished gold are decorated in the same style, several with extensions into the margins. Interestingly, this decoration is found in several Bolognese manuscripts and incunabula in the period of 1468 until 1500 (see for several examples: Guernelli 2006). Could it be that the editor Beroaldo was somehow instrumental in the link between Treviso, where the book was printed and his hometown Bologna, where the decoration was added?PROVENANCE: The coat of arms inserted in the border on the beginning of Pliny's text shows a black imperial eagle or surmounting chequy argent gule. These are the arms of the counts Ottoni, rulers of Matelica, near Macerata (The Marches). Members of this celebrated Italian family excelled, with the papal army, at the wars of the Papal State against the Italian states and foreign powers. In particular, the illumination of the present Historia naturalis might have been made for Alessandro Ottoni (d. 1485). Count Alessandro, "saggio e magnifico sovrano," was captain of the papal army in the wars against Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta and the king of Naples. He was a patron of the arts and crafts, builder of churches and Renaissance monuments at Matelica, and restored ancient buildings of that town. Although the edition is represented quite frequently in public collections, it is extremely rare on the market. Only one other copy is listed in ABPC (1975-2013), sold at auction in 1984. A fine and large copy with wide margins. First three leaves reinforced at the gutter, some worming to first and last few leaves, some minor thumbing and staining, light water-staining in outer margins of nine last quires. Some worming to spine, damages at joints and top of binding. We kindly thank D. Guernelli for information on the decoration. ❧ Goff P-791. Klebs 786.6. On the Ottoni family see: R.W. Lightbown, Carlo Crivelli, Yale 2004, p. 473f. On the illumination see: Daniele Guernelli, "Note per una tipologia umanistica bolognese." in: Schede Umanistiche, no. 1 (2006), pp. 21-42. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
 26.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Opera

      Andreas de Paltasichis and Boninus de Boninis, de Ragusia, 1479, Full-Leather, Book Condition: Very Good ConditionSize: 20cm x 28cm, 12 March 1479. Collation: a10; b-d8; e10; f-m8; M8; N6; n-r8; s-t6; u8; x8; y6; z8; &8; (1); (8); Blank. Blue and red initials, contemporary notes on the margins, some restore on the inner margins of some leaves. New blind-stamped binding with brass clasps and brass book corner (front and back). SUPERB BINDING!!!! Acid-free clamshell box. The date in the colophon is printed "1478". As Mocenigo did not become Doge until 18 May 1478 there must be an error in this date. Contents: De divinis institutionibus; De ira dei; De opificio dei vel de formatione hominis; De phoenice carmen. Epitome divinarum institutionum [cap. LVI-LXXIII]. Venantius Fortunatus: De resurrectione Christi. Goff L8 ; HC 9813; BMC V 251 ; BSB-Ink L-8. PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST, Livre

      [Bookseller: Louis Caron]
 27.   Check availability:     Bookzangle     Link/Print  


         Biblia Latina, Nicolaus Jenson, Venedig 1479. Latin Bible 1479

      Venedig, Nicolaus Jenson, 1479.. Fol., Ledereinband. Jensons gesuchte zweite Ausgabe (EA 1476) da größer (Folio) und schönerer Drucktyp. 439 ff.(von 452, ohne a1[flieg.Vorsatz], a4-7, A2&9, U2-7). 51 Zeilen, zweispaltiger Druck mit rubrizierten Initialen, rot oder blau, a2 Initiale Gold und Polychrom, viele Randanmerkungen in schwarzer Tinte des 16.Jhdts, einige Alt-Restaurationen, teilweise stock-oder schmutzfleckig, getäfelter, etwas späterer Pergamenteinband. [BMC V, 180; Goff B-563; Hain 3073; Proctor 4119] Provenance: 1. Matthaeus Rhedarius, Mai 1550 (Eintrag in Tinte Fußleiste a2). 2. Residentiae Soc:Jesu, Hirschberg 1706 (Eintrag in Tinte Kopfleiste a2). ----- English: Double column, 439 ff. (of 452, lacking a1 (blank), a4-7, A2&9 and U2-7), 51 lines and headline, Gothic type, a2 initial in gold and colours with marginal decoration in blue and white, other initials supplied in red or blue, 16th century ink marginalia, sig. a a few marginal repairs (occasionally obscuring small part of marginalia), a10 repaired tear within text, minor loss, P2 short repaired tear at head, some staining, soiling or spotting, 17th century panelled vellum, soiled, (BMC V, 180; Goff B-563; Hain 3073; Proctor 4119), folio, Venice, Nicolaus Jenson, 1479.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat an der Universität München]
 28.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         Illuminiertes Breviermanuskript.

      [Wohl Österreich], February-Mai 1479.]. Lateinische Handschrift auf Pergament. 540 Bll. (in Tinte foliiert 1-77, in Bleistift bis 210 fortgesetzt, danach nur sporadisch und fehlerhaft). Vollständig bis auf das letzte Blatt (wenn kein Kalender beigebunden war): i-ix10, x8, xi-xxxiv10, xxxv6 (von 10, vii-x ausgeschieden), xxxvi-xxxviii10, xxxix12, xl-xliv10, xlv-li8, lii9 (+ ix), liii11 (+ i), liv-lv10, lvi8. In Tinte auf 31-32 bzw. 42-44 Zln. regliert (Bll. 434-499v). Wohl von mehreren Händen; ausführliche Rubriken in rot. Mit 10 illuminierten Initialen im Psalter, 10zlg. illuminierten Initialen mit Blattwerkseinfassung (darunter ein Vogel) und 9 ähnlichen, kleineren Initialen. Pergament des 17. Jhs. über blindgepr. Holzdeckeln; 2 Schließen; Griffregister. 8vo (155 x 110 mm).. Die attraktiven illuminierten Initialen, vorwiegend im ersten Teil des Bandes zu finden, sind typische Produkte einer österreichischen oder bayerischen Werkstatt; die meisten zeigen hochpoliertes Blattgold und ein charakteristisches blasses Grün und Rosa. Die größte Initiale weist konventionelle Blattwerksdekoration auf, besticht jedoch durch die naturalistische Rose und den Vogel am unteren Rand. - Inhalt: Ferialpsalter Bll. 1-77v; Hymnar Bll. 78-94 (mit dem Hl. Kilian Bl. 87 und der Hl. Ursula Bl. 90); Gebete Bll. 94v-7v; Temporale Bll. 98- 339v, mit weißer Seite 321v und Evangeliumslesungen für die Sonntage Bll. 322-339v; Rubriken für das Sanctorale (am Schluß getilgter Text und Stege entnommener Blätter) Bll. 340-342v; Sanctorale Bll. 343-499v, mit dem Hochfest des Hl. Augustinus als "summum festum" Bl. 458, seine Translatio als "medium festum" 477v; weiße Seite 500r/v; Commune Sanctorum und Kirchenwidmung Bll. 501-536; Gebete, darunter mehrere für den Hl. Augustinus und den Evangelisten Johannes Bll. 536v-538; zusätzliche liturgische Elemente am vorderen Vorsatz sowie zusätzliche Gebete, darunter für Johannes "apostolo et patrono" und Augustinus Bl. 538r/v. - Zwei Kolophone datiert Montag, 8. Februar 1479 und 19. Mai 1479 (Bll. 499v und 538). Demnach anscheinend geschrieben für ein dem Evangelisten Johannes gewidmetes Augustinerkloster ("sanctissimi patris nostri Augustini", f. 458, "patris nostri et patroni", f. 398); die Heiligen im Sanctorale weisen auf einen Ursprung im südöstlichen Deutschland oder - wahrscheinlicher - nortwestlichen Österreich, so etwa der Hl. Florian mit 9 Lektionen und vollem Offizium (Bl. 397), der Hl. Ulrich (vor allem in Augsburg und Salzburg verehrt), Bl. 434, der Hl. Koloman (dessen Zentren der Verehrung in Melk, Wien und Linz lagen), Bl. 478v, sowie des Hl. Virgil von Salzburg, f. 499v. Zahlreiche Nachträge belegen den fortgesetzten Gebrauch bis ins 17. Jahrhundert. Aus der Bibliothek auf Schloß Jegenstorf bei Bern; später versteigert bei Klipstein & Kornfeld (13.-15. Nov. 1947, Nr. 345). - Einige wenige Bll. eingerissen (ohne Textverlust). Einband an den Ecken etwas bestoßen; Vordergelenk angeplatzt.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris, Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
 29.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         ROTHSCHILD MISCELLANY (Fine Facsimile Edition of Illuminated 15th Century Manuscript)

      Facsimile Editions. New. Hardcover.

The most lavish of all Hebrew manuscripts. 948 pages containing 70 religious and secular works including the Passover Haggadah and Siddur. 816 illuminated pages and miniatures illustrate in exquisite detail almost every custom of Jewish life. Executed in northern Italy in 1479. A strictly limited facsimile edition of 550 numbered copies.

Size 21cm x 15.6cm x 10.2cm (8.25" x 6.125" x 4") approximately (page sizes vary slightly). 948 Pages, 474 folios numbered 0-473. 816 illuminated pages with raised burnished gold, flat gold, powdered gold, silver and brilliant delicate colours. 160gsm, uncoated, neutral pH paper.

A paper mill in Italy took more than a year to make a paper that accurately reproduces the opacity, texture and thickness of the manuscript's vellum and has been widely acclaimed as the closest likeness to vellum ever achieved. The paper was developed exclusively for this facsimile.

David Harris the renowned Israeli photographer, photographed the manuscript at the Israel museum in Jerusalem using large-format Ektachrome film in order to capture the finest details. In order to completely eliminate any curvature close to the spine the manuscript was disbound prior to photography so that it could be photographed flat. Specially manufactured glass which is both 'optically flat' and 'optically white' was used to hold the manuscript flat during photography. The printed page is, therefore, exactly the same size as the original.

Offset lithography in up to twelve colours. The three different types of gold found in the manuscript have all been faithfully copied in the facsimile. The raised burnished gold of the original has been reproduced by applying the metal leaf to a specially built up area (replicating the original gesso) exactly where the leaf is raised in the original manuscript. Flat gold was reproduced by applying a metal leaf by hand. Gold powder was applied to all the illuminations that contain it in the original. Silver metal leaf was applied by hand wherever it appeared in the original. Wherever the silver had oxidised, a darker leaf and special varnish was used to accurately portray the oxidisation.

The scribe's pricking holes on either side of each folio were reproduced for the first time ever in a facsimile. Once printed each page was cut to the exact size and shape of the original and then aged at the edges. No previously published facsimile has achieved this level of precision and accuracy.

Fine morocco goatskin, blind-tooled on both covers and the spine. The book block is sewn over hand-made head and tail bands. Four oxidised sterling silver clasps are attached by leather thongs to silver catch plates which are themselves attached by tiny silver nails. 256 pages (46 in colour) printed on mould-made cold-pressed Magnani 160gsm paper.

The commentary volume is bound in blind-tooled morocco goatskin and presented in a cloth covered slip-case to compliment the facsimile. The facsimile and commentary are individually housed in hand made slip-cases. The slip case for the facsimile has been specially constructed to accommodate the clasps.

Each facsimile can be personally dedicated at no extra charge. Whether the facsimile is intended as a gift to an institution or a private individual, our calligrapher can inscribe a beautiful illuminated gift certificate with an appropriate inscription.

Strictly limited to 500 numbered and 50 Ad Personam copies. Each volume. Discreetly numbered by hand on the inside back cover using minute steel dies, is accompanied by a numbered and signed certificate carrying the seal of the Israel Museum. On completion of the edition the printing plates were destroyed to protect the significant investment value of each facsimile.

Price includes robust protective packaging, worldwide courier delivery and insurance. Courier service, usually by UPS. International overnight service usually available at no extra charge. If you would like to have your copy dedicated, please supply us with the inscription separately upon placing your order.

Our Promise to You: ALL OUR DUST JACKETS COME WITH CLEAR BRODART PROTECTIVE COVERS. (Please read listing to determine if this book comes with a dust jacket.) Your order will be CAREFULLY PACKAGED IN A BOX for safe transition. We strive for 100% customer satisfaction!; 8.25"x6.125"x4"; 948 pages .


      [Bookseller: New Boston Fine and Rare Books]
 30.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         SERMONES QUADRAGESIMALES DE LEGIBUS DICTI

      Vicenza: Stephan Koblinger, 1479. Hardcover. A Substantial BookPrinted by the Prototypographer of Vienna. 327 x 200 mm (12 7/8 x 7 7/8"). 404 unnumbered leaves. Double column, 52 lines of text in gothic type. Contemporary Northern Italian blindstamped calf over bevelled wooden boards, covers with multiple frames, one containing palmette tools, another a chain roll, the frames around a central panel filled with rows of hatched Greek crosses, raised bands, neatly rebacked preserving much of original backstrip, traces of four clasps (covers with some recent and expert repair to replicate original decoration). Occasional (slightly later?) red paragraph marks, one decorative initial in red ink. Tail edge of text block with library shelf markings of the (17th century) Count Del Borgo; occasional red ink marginalia in a fine humanist hand; a2 with (17th century?) ink signature of Francisco de Menabio. Goff L-148; BMC VII, 1043. Binding with moderate traces of wear, first two and last two gatherings with very faint marginal dampstaining, otherwise only quite minor defects internally and generally A REMARKABLY ATTRACTIVE COPY, the original binding expertly and solidly restored, the text especially clean, fresh, and bright, and the vast margins occupying more space than the columns of text. Containing works of compelling interest to its contemporaneous audience, this is a hefty incunable from the 1470s of special interest to us as an item done by a printer who produced only a few books, including the first one issued at Vienna. These "Sermones" represent the second of just four known works printed by Stephan Koblinger in Vicenza, and BMC tell us that Koblinger returned to his native Vienna in 1481, where he is almost certainly the printer of the unsigned "Vocabolista Italico-Tedesco," the first book published in that city. Leonardus de Utino (ca. 1400-70) was a popular Dominican preacher whose work was much influenced by the scholasticism of Thomas Aquinas. According to the catalogue of the Nakles sale held at Christie's in 2000, our edition "is a page-for-page reprint of the first edition, printed in 1473 at Venice by Franciscus Renner and Nicolaus de Frankfordia. Koblinger probably trained in Renner's office, since the material and texts of all three of Koblinger's signed Vicenza editions show connections with Renner, including the unusual method of signing using the alphabet (a-y) followed by arabic numerals. . . . Koblinger presumably acquired the punches and/or types after the dissolution of the Renner-Frankfordia partnership in 1477." The present edition is quite rare: our copy, purchased (for $8,000 plus buyer's premium) at the Nakles sale in 2000, is the only one to appear in ABPC since 1960.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 31.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Opera

      Venice: Andreas de Paltasichis and Boninus de Boninis, de Ragusia, 1479 12 March 1479. Collation: a10; b-d8; e10; f-m8; M8; N6; n-r8; s-t6; u8; x8; y6; z8; &8; (1); (8); Blank. Blue and red initials, contemporary notes on the margins, some restore on the inner margins of some leaves. New blind-stamped binding with brass clasps and brass book corner (front and back). SUPERB BINDING!!!! Acid-free clamshell box. The date in the colophon is printed "1478". As Mocenigo did not become Doge until 18 May 1478 there must be an error in this date. Contents: De divinis institutionibus; De ira dei; De opificio dei vel de formatione hominis; De phoenice carmen. Epitome divinarum institutionum [cap. LVI-LXXIII]. Venantius Fortunatus: De resurrectione Christi. Goff L8 ; HC 9813; BMC V 251 ; BSB-Ink L-8. PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

      [Bookseller: Louis Caron]
 32.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Historia Ecclesiastica

      Translated from the Greek by Rufinus of Aquileia (345-410). 171 (of 172) leaves, without the final blank. 34 lines, Roman letter, initials in red or blue, several with extensions in green or brown ink in the margins, headline & paragraph marks all supplied in red or blue. Small folio (301 x 200 mm.), early 19th-cent. straight-grained blue morocco, sides panelled in gilt, bud & leaf tools at the corners of the inner & outer frames & in the middle of the outer frame, Spencer arms on sides in gilt, spine in compartments gilt, a.e.g. by Charles Hering with his ticket. Mantua: J. Schall, July 1479. Fourth edition, and a fine copy, of this attractive book. Dibdin wrote of this copy in the Bibliotheca Spenceriana, III, p. 309-"It is seldom that we behold a more elegant specimen of ancient typography than that which is now before us...The present is a beautiful copy, in blue morocco binding. From the Roxburgh [sic] Collection." This is the most celebrated work of Eusebius (ca. 260-ca. 340), known as the "Father of Church History." The "Ecclesiastical History" is the "principal source for the history of Christianity from the Apostolic Age till his own day...it contains an immense range of material on the Eastern Church."-Cross, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, p. 473. Provenance: signature of Johannes Gerlinger on fol. 1r and at the end of the text; the Benedictine Abbey of St. Peter, Salzburg, with an ownership inscription at the head of fol. 2v; John, third Duke of Roxburghe, sale London, May 1812, lot 7786; George John, Earl Spencer. A fine copy, preserved in a box. A few fore-margins with small repairs (where index tabs were repaired and upper outer corner of fol. 20 restored. ❧ Goff E-127. GKW 9437. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
 33.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  

______________________________________________________________________________


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     561 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service     


Copyright © 2017 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.