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         Alte Typographie und Buchkunst. Originalblätter aus Büchern des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts. Hrsg. von H. Wendland. Beinwil am See, Edition Eichenberger, (1990). Titel, 12 Blätter, jeweils unter Passepartout montiert. Mit 17 Holzschnitten u. 1 Holzschnitt-Initiale sowie zahlr. roten u. blauen Lombarden. Folio. In OLwd.-Flügelmappe mit Deckelschild.

      Eines von 300 nummerierten Exemplaren.- Enthält je ein Originalblatt aus 1. Speculum humanae salvationis. Augsburg, Zainer, 1473. 5. Deutsche Bibel. Sorg Bibel. Augsburg, Sorg, 1480. 11. de Tudeschis. Lectura super V libros Decretalium. Basel, Ruppel/Richel/Wenssler, 1477. 19. Schedel. Das buch der Chroniken. Nürnberg, Koberger, 1493. Mit 17 Holzschnitten. 25. Publii Virgilii maronis opera. Straßburg, Grüninger, 1502. 34. Livius. Historiae romanae decades I,III et IV. Paris, Du Pré, 1486. 35. La des mer des histoires. Paris, le Rouge/Commin, 1488. 40. Missale ad usum Rothomagensem (?). Rouen, Morin, 1510. Mit 1 Holzschnittinitiale. 41. Gratianus. Libellus siue opus super decreto. Venedig, Arrivabenus, 1490. 42. Dante. Divina Commedia. Venedig, de Plasiis, 1491. 49. Rolevinck. Fasciculus temporum. (niederl.). Utrecht, Veldener, 1480. 50. Ludolphus de Saxonia. Boec van de leven ons heern Jesu Christi. Zwolle, van Os (?), 1499.- Ohne den Textband.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Daniel Schramm e.K.]
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         DE VITA SOLITARIA

      The R-printer (Adolf Rusch) not after 1473], [Strassburg - 286 x 212 mm. (11 1/4 x 8 1/4"). [89] leaves. Single column, 34 lines in roman type. FIRST EDITION. Pleasing 18th century crimson morocco, gilt, covers with triple fillet border, flat spine in compartments with central floral spray surrounded by small tools, curling floral vine cornerpieces, gilt titling, turn-ins with floral gilt roll, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Goff P-417; BMC I, 61. Joints lightly worn, covers with a few small stains and scratches, leaves with light dampstain to lower quarter, sometimes touching the last two line of text, one quire a little browned, with slightly darker dampstain, otherwise an excellent copy, generally clean and crisp, with generous margins and a sturdy binding. This is the first printing of Petrarch's autobiographical essay defending the solitary life, originally composed between 1346 and 1356. The ideal life, in Petrarch's view, was one spent in study and contemplation in a place of tranquility, far from the distractions of urban life. His treatise is considered the earliest example of psychological introspection in Western literature, and it gives the modern reader insight into the attitude and priorities of a humanist in the Renaissance. In addition to being a poet and a scholar, Petrarch (1304-74) was an ardent bibliophile, and one of the first known book collectors. The anonymous printer here is defined by the distinctive capital "R" in this typeface and has long been identified as Adolf Rusch of Strassburg, an apprentice for Johann Mentelin, the first printer in that city. Rusch married Mentelin's daughter Salome, and printed books for his own shop and for his father-in-law, before succeeding to Mentelin's press in 1477. He later gave up printing for dealing in paper. The typeface here was the first roman font to be used outside of Italy. While the present volume is entirely complete in itself, "Vita Solitaria" has more than once appeared in the marketplace bound with "Secretum de Contemptu Mundi," a related work by Petrarch published by Rusch at about the same time. ABPC records no separate copies of "Vita" at auction since at least 1975, while RBH finds four separate copies, all sold in the 1930s, one of them the present copy (at Anderson Galleries in 1935, price not recorded). This is the first printing of Petrarch's autobiographical essay defending the solitary life, originally composed between 1346 and 1356. The ideal life, in Petrarch's view, was one spent in study and contemplation in a place of tranquility, far from the distractions of urban life. His treatise is considered the earliest example of psychological introspection in Western literature, and it gives the modern reader insight into the attitude and priorities of a humanist in the Renaissance. In addition to being a poet and a scholar, Petrarch (1304-74) was an ardent bibliophile, and one of the first known book collectors. The anonymous printer here is defined by the distinctive capital "R" in this typeface and has long been identified as Adolf Rusch of Strassburg, an apprentice for Johann Mentelin, the first printer in that city. Rusch married Mentelin's daughter Salome, and printed books for his own shop and for his father-in-law, before succeeding to Mentelin's press in 1477. He later gave up printing for dealing in paper. The typeface here was the first roman font to be used outside of Italy. While the present volume is entirely complete in itself, "Vita Solitaria" has more than once appeared in the marketplace bound with "Secretum de Contemptu Mundi," a related work by Petrarch published by Rusch at about the same time. ABPC records no separate copies of "Vita" at auction since at least 1975, while RBH finds four separate copies, all sold in the 1930s, one of them the present copy (at Anderson Galleries in 1935, price not recorded). [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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         OPUS TRIVIUM

      [Cologne: Ulrich Zel, not after 1473]. FIRST EDITION. This compendium of civil and canon law by an English Dominican friar was one of the earliest printed books to be indexed and cross-referenced, facilitating its use by preachers looking for sermon material. John Bromyard (d. ca. 1352) spent his career at a Dominican priory in Hereford, where, according to DNB, he "had a marked influence on homiletic literature in the later middle ages" by writing numerous handbooks for preachers, among them the present work, the first of his writings to appear in print. His aim was "to displace frivolous material such as animal lore and exotic stories from the pulpit, and replace it with the solid moral doctrine of canon law." The work is today perhaps of more interest for its organization than for its sermonizing. Bromyard employed then-revolutionary techniques, including an alphabetical index, standardized divisions of the text, and cross-references, all important milestones in the history of information organization. Ulrich Zel (fl. 1466-1507) was the first printer in Cologne, where his initial dated book was issued in 1466. His was a very substantial output, including approximately 180 works, all in Latin and generally characterized by conservative typography and design. He is perhaps better known in printing history for his contributions to the anonymous "Cologne Chronicle" (1499), in which his testimony supports both Gutenberg and (more controversially) Laurens Janszoon Coster of Haarlem as the person responsible for the origin of printing in the West. ISTC records just two incunabular editions of the present work--our Zel imprint and a 1500 Lyon printing. And the book is very rarely seen in the marketplace: according to ABPC/RBH, our edition has appeared just twice at auction since 1968 (and the Lyon edition once).. 305 x 220 mm. (12 x 8 1/2"). [296] leaves (of 298, lacking blank leaves 19 and 298).Edited by Philippus de Bronnerde. FIRST EDITION. Excellent recent retrospective calf, with numerous blind rules and blind-stamps in the style of the period, convincing replica clasps. Paragraph marks in red, capitals struck with red, numerous three-line initials in red or blue, 21 six-line puzzle initials with penwork elaboration in light brown and, sometimes, green, two of these with extensions running the length of the column to form a bar border. Goff J-258; BMC I, 192. First leaf a bit soiled, with fore-edge margin reinforced on verso, final leaf with three-inch square (of blank space) at lower fore-edge corner replaced (to remove inscription?), a little dust soiling to head edge, one page with printing error causing loss to a couple of words, occasional small stains, smudges, short tears, or trivial worming to margins, but an excellent copy despite minor defects, the text very clean and fresh, with ample margins, in an unworn retrospective binding. This compendium of civil and canon law by an English Dominican friar was one of the earliest printed books to be indexed and cross-referenced, facilitating its use by preachers looking for sermon material. John Bromyard (d. ca. 1352) spent his career at a Dominican priory in Hereford, where, according to DNB, he "had a marked influence on homiletic literature in the later middle ages" by writing numerous handbooks for preachers, among them the present work, the first of his writings to appear in print. His aim was "to displace frivolous material such as animal lore and exotic stories from the pulpit, and replace it with the solid moral doctrine of canon law." The work is today perhaps of more interest for its organization than for its sermonizing. Bromyard employed then-revolutionary techniques, including an alphabetical index, standardized divisions of the text, and cross-references, all important milestones in the history of information organization. Ulrich Zel (fl. 1466-1507) was the first printer in Cologne, where his initial dated book was issued in 1466. His was a very substantial output, including approximately 180 works, all in Latin and generally characterized by conservative typography and design. He is perhaps better known in printing history for his contributions to the anonymous "Cologne Chronicle" (1499), in which his testimony supports both Gutenberg and (more controversially) Laurens Janszoon Coster of Haarlem as the person responsible for the origin of printing in the West. ISTC records just two incunabular editions of the present work--our Zel imprint and a 1500 Lyon printing. And the book is very rarely seen in the marketplace: according to ABPC/RBH, our edition has appeared just twice at auction since 1968 (and the Lyon edition once).

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         Single Leaf from Beavais? Speculum historiale]

      Strasbourg: Johann Mentelin, 1473. The page is from the second edition of this work, printed in Strasbourg by Johann Mentelin in 1473. Printed, in black ink, on both sides in double columns containing 62 lines in thick roman script. Many of the capital letters are touched in yellow ink and there are paragraph rubrics in red as well as large rubricated capitals in red and blue. The leaf is headlined XXXI on one side in red and II on the other in blue. Folio, approx 18 by 12 inches, handsomely mounted in cream boards ruled in yellow and red Single leaf. Extremely well preserved, fine and very handsome. VERY RARE EARLY INCUNABULA BY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PRINTERS OF THE EARLY RENAISSANCE. Vincent of Beauvais was a Dominican friar who left the monastic life and eventually became lector and chaplain to the court of the French King Louis the IX. It was under such patronage that he undertook the task of writing three huge encyclopedias which he intended to include the sum of all knowledge from the time of creation to his own present day. The three major works were divided into the Speculum Majus, the Speculum Doctrinale and the Speculum Historiale. The last, despite its name, is not as much a historical overview as much as it is metaphysical commentary on religion, faith and other things supernatural. It is often regarded as the most personal and introspective of the three works and includes (as do the other two) pieces of poetry and music, possibly written by the author himself. Despite its many omissions and fallacies, all three sections of the Speculum were an influence and inspiration to poets and writers for centuries afterward, and was especially important to many of the Romantic writers, with Lord Byron often citing him as a primary influence.

      [Bookseller: Buddenbrooks, Inc.]
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         SPECULUM HISTORIALE

      [Strassburg]: Johann Mentelin, [1473]. Second Edition. 494 x 330 mm. (19 1/2 x 12 3/4"). [201] leaves (of 202, lacking initial blank). Double column, 62 lines, roman letter. Volume III (of four). Second Edition. Contemporary blind-stamped pigskin over thick wooden boards, covers with blind-ruled frame and diapered central panel accented with small stamps, including flowers, fleurs-de-lys, and pelicans, faded ink titling at head of frame, holes from corner and center bosses, raised bands, remnants of paper library labels on spine, two brass catches and clasps, pastedowns of vellum made from 15th century manuscript leaves, later free endpapers and flyleaves, original leather finding tabs at fore edge. Rubricated in red, capitals struck with red, initials in red, green, and blue, nine larger initials in red and blue, two puzzle initials in red, blue, and green. Goff V-283; BMC I, 57. Binding rather soiled, front joint cracked, but the board very firmly attached, small portions of leather lacking from head and tail of spine, boards exposed at corners, but the binding quite sound and with much of its antique appeal intact. First page a bit soiled, three leaves in quire ee with fore-edge margin cut away (resuling in minor loss from the text in one paragraph), two leaves with neatly repaired cuts, one leaf with marginal tear from missing tab, half a dozen leaves with small brown stains to text, occasional trivial thumbing and stains to the (generous) margins, but all of these defects minor, and the text generally fresh and quite appealing. This is a massive volume from the major encyclopedia of the Middle Ages, issued by the press of the proto-printer of Strassburg. The major work of Dominican friar Vincent of Beauvais (or Vincentius Bellovacensis, ca. 1190 - ca. 1264), the "Speculum Maius" ("Great Mirror") was composed of three parts: "Speculum Naturale" ("Mirror of Nature"), covering natural history; "Speculum Doctrinale" ("Mirror of Doctrine"), dealing with the arts and sciences; and "Speculum Historiale," containing the history of the world up to Vincent's time. The last was the most widely disseminated part of the encyclopedia, and provided source material for such writers as Chaucer, Mandeville, and Christine de Pisan. The present volume contains books 17 through 23 (of 32), which feature the histories of the monarchies in France and Britain, the lives of numerous saints, and the rise of Mohammed. This edition appeared the same year as the first, which was printed by Mentelin's son-in-law Adolph Rusch, known as the "R" printer. Mentelin (ca. 1410-78) began his career as an illuminator and scribe, and must have learned the art of printing in Mainz, the only place in Europe where it was being done at the time. He opened the first printing shop in Strassburg at the end of the 1450s, but did not put his name on the works he published until 1465. In 1466, he issued the first Bible to be printed in a vernacular language (German), 50 years before the appearance of Luther's translation. Copies of any particular early edition of any part of the "Speculum Maius" are uncommon on the market, and the our edition is no exception; in addition to the present copy, ABPC and Rare Book Hub list just one complete copy of any part of the 1473 Mentelin printing since 1937 (that being a complete book, sold in 2009 for $45,600). This is a massive volume from the major encyclopedia of the Middle Ages, issued by the press of the proto-printer of Strassburg. The major work of Dominican friar Vincent of Beauvais (or Vincentius Bellovacensis, ca. 1190 - ca. 1264), the "Speculum Maius" ("Great Mirror") was composed of three parts: "Speculum Naturale" ("Mirror of Nature"), covering natural history; "Speculum Doctrinale" ("Mirror of Doctrine"), dealing with the arts and sciences; and "Speculum Historiale," containing the history of the world up to Vincent's time. The last was the most widely disseminated part of the encyclopedia, and provided source material for such writers as Chaucer, Mandeville, and Christine de Pisan. The present volume contains books 17 through 23 (of 32), which feature the histories of the monarchies in France and Britain, the lives of numerous saints, and the rise of Mohammed. This edition appeared the same year as the first, which was printed by Mentelin's son-in-law Adolph Rusch, known as the "R" printer. Mentelin (ca. 1410-78) began his career as an illuminator and scribe, and must have learned the art of printing in Mainz, the only place in Europe where it was being done at the time. He opened the first printing shop in Strassburg at the end of the 1450s, but did not put his name on the works he published until 1465. In 1466, he issued the first Bible to be printed in a vernacular language (German), 50 years before the appearance of Luther's translation. Copies of any particular early edition of any part of the "Speculum Maius" are uncommon on the market, and the our edition is no exception; in addition to the present copy, ABPC and Rare Book Hub list just one complete copy of any part of the 1473 Mentelin printing since 1937 (that being a complete book, sold in 2009 for $45,600).

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         Epitoma rei militaris. Mit Widmungsbrief an Petrus Paulus de Comite, herausgegeben von Johannes Sulpitius.

      4. 58 nn. Bll. (Rom. Type, 33 Zeilen, Min. f. Initialen), Mod. HLdr. m. goldgepr. Rückentitel. Frühe Inkunabelausgabe dieses um 400 n. Chr. geschriebenen und erstmals in Utrecht um 1473 gedruckten Handbuches der Kriegskunde, das die Gebiete der militär. Organisation, der Taktik, des Belagerungswesens u. der Seekriegsführung umfaßte. Das Buch entsprang patriotischer Begeisterung die Darstellung beruht auf guten Quellen [...] der Stärkung der Verteidigungskraft sollte sein Werk dienen [...] (Volpi S. 648f.). - Kleiner zeitgen. Namenszug am ersten Blatt. Zwei kl. Wurmlöcher im Unterrand, Ein Blatt mit hinterl. Randeinriß. Vereinzelt gering fleckig. - Insgesamt schönes und breitrandiges Exemplar auf starkem Papier. - GW M49495 Hain/C. 15913 Goff S343 (A) Klebs 1019.4 BSB-Ink V-62 Proctor 3824 BMC IV, 107 IA 18862 ISTC iv00106500.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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         Sermones dominicales super evangelia et epistolas.

      Fol. 368 nn. Bll. (ohne das erste u. letzte weiße Got. Type, 2 Spalten, 42-43 Zeilen mit zahlr. Initialspatien), Mod. Sämischldr.-Bd. a. 7 Bünden. Bedeutende mittelalterliche Sammlung von Sonntagspredigten über die Evangelien und Briefe. Der Verfasser Hugo de Prato Florido trat nach einem Studium der Theologie in Neapel im Jahre 1301 in Pisa in den Dominikanerorden ein und verstarb 1322 in Prato. - Eindrucksvoller Frühdruck, wahrscheinlich aus der Werkstatt Georg Husners, der seit 1473 in Strassburg nachweisbar ist. Ab etwa 1480 bis 1498 blieben seine Arbeiten stets ohne Druckerangaben. - Oberes Kapital m. gekl. Einriß. Das erste Registerbl. am Kopfsteg hinterlegt (ohne Textverlust). Ganz vereinzelt rubriziert bzw. mit zeitgen. Marginalien. Fast durchg. kl. Wurmstich (mit unbedeutendem Buchstabenverlust). Schwach gebräunt u. tlw. leicht fingerfleckig bzw. wasserrandig. - GW 13574 Hain/C. 9003 BSB-Ink H-416 Proctor 633A Goff H509 BMC I, 130 ISTC ih00509000.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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         "Ungarn (Matthias Corvinus) 1473 (1472)-1477 [...] Erblande ". Manuscript. N. p. o. d.

      1473. 4to. 180 ff. Collection of copies of letters and other documents concerning the reign of the Hungarian king and the "dominions".

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris]
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         Speculum historiale. Blatt aus: Secundi Voluminis Liber XI (GWM 50587, C 6246). Cap. 4 bis Cap. 7.

      Straßburg Johann Mentelin 4 Dezember Type 8 1473 - Zweispaltiges, 72-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit Liber-Nummer in roter und blauer Schrift im oberen Rand mit drei roten u. blauen Lombarden, gelb gestrichenen Versalbuchstaben, roten Rubriken und rot unterstrichenen Titeln auf klanghellem und festem Papier. Blattgröße: 32 x 47 cm. - - - Im rechten unteren Blattrand befindet sich eine von Mentelin handgestempelte Signatur des Blattes. Die Signatur hat die Buchstaben "ai". Handgestempelte Signaturen in den Drucken deutscher Werkstätten sind eine Seltenheit und gehören fast immer einer Zeit an, in der anderwärts die Signaturen bereits in unmittelbarem Anschluss an den Text hergestellt wurden. Die ersten Signaturen wurden, wie bei Albrecht Pfister in Bamberg, noch handschriftlich angebracht. Die meisten dieser Signaturen fielen beim Einbinden des Buches dem Beschneiden zum Opfer. Der erste Drucker, der Signaturen zugleich mit dem Textsatz hergestellt hat, war Johann Koelhoff in Köln. (vgl. Haebler 1925, 50f)

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         Speculum humanae salvationis cum speculo S. Mariae Virginis (lateinisch u. deutsch). (GWM 43054, H 14929). "Lamech ward gepeynniget von czweyen seynen haußfrawen Sella und Oda" und "Ochior der fürer der kinder Omon ward gebunden von der warheyt wegen an eynen bawm".

      Augsburg oder St Ulrich und Afra Günther Zainer Type 2 1473 - Einspaltiges, 34-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit zwei Holzschnitten jeweils 11,9 x 7,3 cm. Im unteren Rand gering fingerfleckig. Blattgröße: 19,5 x 29,4 cm. Incunabula text woodcut leaf. - - - Blatt aus der Erstausgabe des Speculum humanae. Der Inkunabelkatalog (INKA) und der BVB geben an, dass das Werk im Kloster St. Ulrich und Afra gedruckt wurde. Der erste Holzschnitt zeigt Gewalt von Frauen gegen einen Mann. Bei diesem frühen Beispiel wird Lamech von seinen Ehefrauen Zilla und Ada mit Knüppeln verprügelt. Lamech sind dabei die Hände gebunden. Der zweite Holzschnitt zeigt wie Achior der Führer des Stammes Amon, an einen Baum gebunden wird. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         Singularia cum allegationibus (Singularia juris, secundum alphabetum ordinata) (GWM34972, IBE 4732). Blatt 71/ 72.

      (Segovia) Johannes Parix de Heydelberga Type 1 (111R) 1473 - Einspaltiges, 34-zeilige O-Inkunabelblatt. Blatt mit 5 Wurmlöchern im Randbereich, Blatt etwas fleckig und Sammlerstempel im unteren Randbereich, Blattgröße: 20,5 x 29,5 cm. Leaf, text. Rara! Sehr selten! Ein Blatt aus der Ersten Druckerei Spaniens, die von dem Deutschen Drucker Johann Parix aus Heidelberg im Jahre 1472 in Segovia (Aguilafuente) gegründet wurde. Odriozola und ordnet Parix acht Bücher zu, die er in Segovia zwischen 1472 und 1474 druckte. Alle acht Bücher aus Segovia druckte er mit einer einzigen Type, seiner „111R". 1474 verlegt Juan Párix seinen Druckort nach Toulouse. Das hier angebotene Blatt aus dem "Segovianer Pontanus" gehört nach Odriozola zum sechsten (IBE 4733), in Segovia gedruckten Werk und gehört in die Frühzeit des spanischen Buchdruckes (Protoincunables). (vgl. Antonio Odriozola: Los protoincunables (1472-1479) impresos por Juan Parix en Segovia (Espana) y Toulouse (Francia) In : Gutenberg-Jahrbuch 1976, 130ff.) Der Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke verzeichnet von Johann Parix 46 Drucke, die er mehrheitlich ab 1474 in Toulouse druckte. Die "Singularia iuris" beinhaltet kurze juristische Hinweise für Laien. (Juan Parix Primer impresor en Espana 2004, p. 298

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         De revolutionibus orbium coelestium, libri VI . . . Narratio prima, per M. Georgium Ioachimum Rheticum ad D. Ioan. Schonerum scripta.

      With printer?s device on title and verso of last leaf and numerous text woodcuts and tables. Contemporary vellum, author and title in ink on spine; title page repaired on upper corner and on fore - edge. A fine, clean copy. Second edition of Copernicus? epochal work. Copernicus (1473 - 1543), the founder of modern astronomy, was the first to propound the theory of planetary orbits. This work revealed one of the greatest advances in human thought proving that the Earth was not after all the central point around which the entire universe revolved. Copernicus initially was hesitant to have his system printed, believing that any suggestion that the Earth moved would be considered heretical and cause him trouble. It was likely that this edition ?was printed soon after the 1543 printing had sold out; the two editions must have been almost identical in size because the same number of each printing survive (Gingerich).? Added here for the first time is Rheticus? famous tract, Narratio prima, printed in the form of a letter to his teacher Joh. Schoener, the Nuremberg astronomer. This great rarity, first published in 1540, contains the actual first announcement of Copernicus?s system and has exercised a profound influence on all succeeding scientific endeavors. Rheticus, a disciple and friend, surveys the principal features of Copernicus? heliocentric universe and describes the new discoveries made by Copernicus ?" probably the most important scientific text of the sixteenth century.

      [Bookseller: B & L Rootenberg]
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         DECRETALES EPISTOLAE SUMMORUM PONTIFICUM, A GREGORIO NONO PONTEFICE MAXIMO COLLECTAE.

      "Mendis sanè quamplurimis summa diligentia repurgatae". "Adiectis passim ad marginem, tam Bibliorum quàm Iuris Civilis concordantiis". Testo latino. Cm.16,4x10,7. Pg.56 non numerate, 824 numerate solo al recto. Legatura in piena pergamena, con lievi spellature. Alcuni capilettera incisi. Si tratta di una delle edizioni a stampa cinquecentesche dei celebri Decreti di Papa Gregorio IX, al secolo Ugolino dei Conti Segni, salito al soglio pontificio il 19 marzo 1227 come successore di Onorio III. Fiero avversario di Federico II, a lui si deve l'istituzione, nel 1232, del Tribunale dell'Inquisizione. Il testo dei "Decretales", in cinque libri, fu fatto compilare dal suo cappellano Ramon De Penaforte, e inviato il 5 settembre 1234 alla Università di Bologna: conteneva i principi fondamentali del diritto canonico medioevale e come tale fu poi inserito nel Corpus Iuris Canonici fino alla riforma di Benedetto XV. La prima edizione a stampa fu edita a Mayence nel 1473.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Pera]
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         Speculum historiale. Blatt aus: Secundi Voluminis Liber X / XI (GWM 50587, C 6246). (Blatt 56).

      Straßburg, Johann Mentelin, 4. Dezember 1473. Type 8.. Zweispaltiges, 72-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit Liber-Nummer in roter und blauer Schrift im oberen Rand, einer 5-zeiligen blau-roten Initiale, vier roten u. blauen Lombarden, roten Versalien, roten Rubriken und rot unterstrichenen Titeln. Wasserzeichen. Blatt mit einigen Tintenspuren und einer Knickspur im Rand. Blattgröße: 31 x 45 cm.. Das Werk ist unter folgendem Link online einsehbar: http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0003/bsb00035799/images/index.html

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         [Dialogus inter clericum et militem super dignitate papali et regia:] Disputacio inter clericum et militem. - Compendium de vita Antichristi

      [Cologne: ca. 1473].. Chancery half-sheet 4to (209 x 147 mm). Collation: [1-28] (1/1r-2/5v Disputatio inter clericum et militem, 2/6r-2/8v Compendium de vita Anticristi). 16 leaves. 26 lines. Type: 100(107). Two 4-line initial spaces. Initials and paragraph marks alternating in red and blue, the first with infill and flourishing in blue. First leaf rehinged, repairs in gutter margin of last leaf, marginal paper flaw to 1/7, some marginal soiling. Old vellum (recased); folding cloth case. Provenance: contemporary inscription on a1r: occam he[re]tic[us]; Charles Lemuel Nichols (1851-1929), bookplate; Mrs. Philip D. Sang (sale, Sotheby's New York, 24 September 1986, lot 144).*** first edition of this tract on the proper boundary between papal and lay power, couched as a dialogue between a cleric and a knight, probably composed shortly before 1302 in the context of the struggle between Pope Boniface VIII and Philip the Fair of France. The direct target of the anonymous author's veiled attack on papal power is the Flemish clergy who agitated against Philip. Formerly ascribed to William of Ockham, as is evident from the early inscription on the first page, the pamphlet is considered the work of Petrus de Bosco (Pierre Dubois), one of Philip?'s publicists and pamphleteers. The pamphlet's interest to Cologne readers of the 1470s lay in in its discussion of the legitimacy of taxation of ecclesiastical properties by local civil authorities, a question of urgent relevance to the city of Cologne in 1473, in desperate need of funds for defense against the aggressions of Charles the Bold of Burgundy. The anonymous Compendium de vita Antichristi is appended to all 13 recorded fifteenth-century editions. Of these nine were printed at Cologne, all unsigned and most undated. A stemma of the Cologne editions was recently established by Wolfgang Schmitz ("Die Kölner Ausgaben des Dialogus inter clericum et militem," Gutenberg Jahrbuch 1999, pp. 106-112). This work was one of the first printed books to be banned. Cologne was the site of the first successful prosecution of printers by ecclesiastical authorities for alleged misuse of the press (cf. Grendler, The Roman Inquisition, Princeton 1977, p. 71). In 1479 the University of Cologne obtained from Sixtus IV the authority to censure printed books, and to apply this authority with the support of the local magistrates through prosecution of printers, booksellers and readers. The present pamphlet seems to have been one of several tracts hostile to the papacy which were forbidden by the city council between 1479 and 1483. Following four editions printed at Cologne in 1473 and 1475 and one in 1478, there is a telltale gap of about eleven years before the appearance of another edition there, followed by three more in the early 1490s. The Augustinus `De fide?' press produced 11 quarto and 2 folio editions, all datable to 1473-74, of which two mention Cologne as the place of printing. The single type used by the press is a variant of a type probably cut by Johann Veldener, and used, with slight variations, by several Cologne shops, including Caxton's first shop. The press has been variously identified with Goiswin Gops (cf. BMC I, 23) and, more recently, Johann Schilling (S. Corsten, Die Anfänge des Kölner Buchdrucks, Cologne 1955, pp. 44-45), but Paul Needham has argued for retaining the eponymous appellation because of the slight but consistent variations in the type of this group of editions (Ars Impressoria... Festgabe für Severin Corsten, Munich 1986, pp. 103-131). Goff D-147 (Huntington and Morgan Library); HC 6111*, H 1147 (the Compendium); BMC I, 233 (IA.3717); BSB-Ink D-105; GW 8261.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
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         Geographia, Libri XVI

      Translated by Guarinus Veronensis and Gregorius Tiphernas, edited by Johannes Andreas, Bishop of Aleria. 46 lines, Roman type; small initials supplied in blue. 238 leaves (of 240, without the first & final blanks). Folio (379 x 261 mm.), 18th-century Italian red morocco (spine partly rebacked, later endpapers, more spotting), covers with a gilt dentelle border, cover edges and turn-ins gilt with ornamental rolls, spine gilt, a.e.g. Rome: Conrad Sweynheym & Arnold Pannartz, 12 February 1473. Third edition, the second to be issued by Sweynheym and Pannartz. This is the only surviving work of the Greek geographer and historian Strabo (ca. 63 B.C.-ca. A.D. 23). Composed of seventeen books, it was the first comprehensive work to bring together all the geographical knowledge of the world known in his time. The Geographia is based on his own observations during extensive travels, but for the most part on the works of earlier writers, including Homer, Eratosthenes, Polybius and others. The Greek text was not translated into Latin before the middle of the 15th century. The humanist Guarino Veronese (1374-1460), translated books 1-10 and Gregorio Tifernate (1414-ca. 1462) translated books 11-17. This celebrated Latin version was edited by the humanist Giovanni Andrea Bussi (1417-75), bishop of Aleria, and was first published in 1469 in Rome by the same printers that produced the present third edition. The second edition was printed in Venice by Vindelinus de Spira, in 1472. Three further editions appeared by the end of the century; the first Greek edition, however, was published only in 1516 by the Aldine press. This very fine volume comes from the second printing workshop of the two German printers that introduced the art of printing to Italy, Konrad Sweynheym (d. 1477) and Arnold Pannartz (d. 1476). As one of their major innovations, the two German printers developed a prototype of Antiqua typefaces (Roman type), based on humanistic script, which was preferred in Italy. Sweynheym and Pannartz thus were the first printers to employ Roman type in their books instead of the textura or blackletter used by Johannes Gutenberg and the early printers in Germany. This early edition is extremely rare, even rarer than the preceding editions from Rome and Venice. A fine copy. Contemporary annotations by two different hands in brown ink, predominantly on first and final twenty leaves, respectively. Minor foxing, small wormholes in the first and last quires, first two leaves reinforced at the gutter. ❧ Goff S-795. Klebs 935.3. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Problemata

      Translated by Theodorus Gaza. [96] leaves (the 6th leaf a blank). 39 lines, Roman type. Capital strokes & paragraph marks in table supplied in red & blue. Folio (288 x 205 mm.), modern boards covered with 15th-century manuscript leaves, the front including the Commemorations on the Feast of the Holy Family Malachias 3:1 opening with illuminated initial E, the back cover with text from Mark 14 (several unimportant marginal wormholes). Mantua: J. Vurster and J. Baumeister, [ca. 1473]. First edition of Aristotle's Problemata; this is one of the earliest of any of the texts by Aristotle to be published. The Problemata are a collection of scientific dissertations in the form of questions and answers ascribed to Aristotle in twenty chapters. Subjects include mathematics, meteorology, medicine, wine, botany, oceanography, vision, and color. The text was translated by Theodorus Gaza (ca. 1400-1475), who fled from his native city of Thessalonica before its capture by the Turks in 1430. He was one of the leaders of the revival of learning in the 15th century. In 1447 he became professor of Greek in the new university of Ferrara, to which his fame soon attracted students from all parts of Italy. In 1450, at the invitation of Pope Nicholas V, he went to Rome, where he was for some years employed in making Latin translations from Aristotle and other Greek authors. With the signature and notes of Tobias Faber, very probably the Lutheran minister who flourished ca. 1580 and was the author of Theses Medicae (Basel: 1580). A fine copy and very rare; ISTC locates only three copies in the U.S. (Harvard, LC, and PML). Goff A-1030. Klebs 95.1. Stillwell 583. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Psalterium Latinum [Psalter in Latin]. Ferial Psalter of Dominican use

      [South Germany, perhaps Bamberg] 1473. Squat 8vo, 202 leaves, apparently complete, including the first vellum leaf (a blank), 18 lines, written in dark brown black ink in a gothic liturgical hand, rubrics in red, Calendar in red and blue and dark brown. Red and blue two-line initials throughout, HUNDREDS OF THREE-LINE INITIALS PAINTED IN BLUE, GREEN, YELLOW, RED, AND BLACK AND WITH GROTESQUES OF ANIMALS AND HUMAN FACES, many heightened in gold paint and some with quite elaborate flourishes into the margins, mostly placed by the MUSIC placed in four-line red staves with square neumes. EIGHT LARGE ILLUMINATED INITIALS WITH BORDERS extending into the upper and lower margins, the initials painted in colors and gold, the borders of foliate designs incorporating birds and beasts, the first and last especially elaborate (trimmed at the top with slight loss to the border edge on most of them) and TWO FOUR-LINE INITIALS one in red and blue ink with red penwork sprays extending to the upper and lower margins, one almost entirely in green with an owl in the bas-de-page and a scroll with the word ÔAMENUMÕ. Some early additions to the Calendar, later manuscript annotations and prayers, including a 15th-century note of ownership (see below), at the end. Sixteenth-century calf over wooden boards, blind-stamped and ruled into multiple compartments, the borders with four roll-tools (not yet identified in Schreiber), contemporary indexing tabs on edges of pages, original pins in upper cover and later thongs retaining the original clasps (joints cracked but sound, backstrip rubbed). Additional ownership inscription on the front endpaper of S. Maria Rosalia Chweiggartin, old booksellerÕs printed description (#322) with the number also separately pasted on the top left corner of the pastedown, modern bookplate of John Whiting, and Helen Otillie, Friel. Enclosed in a sumptuous red morocco pull-off box, with cloth chemise fitted to accommodate the clasps and pins. Generally in lovely condition, with few signs of use; the lower margin is especially generous and still reveals a number of catchwords for the binder. There are two natural flaws in the vellum which have been written around (ff. 146 and 157) and manuscript corrigenda have been inserted at ff. 174 and 190v). A delightful Psalter with an early female provenance, probably originating from Bamberg or its environs in south Germany (see below), and with a number of interesting or unusual features. In addition to the quite lavish and decorative illuminated initials, the plethora of painted three-line initials is notable for the evident delight the artist took in his work, adding birds and beasts and faces with an almost giddy abandon in a naive regional style that uses a lot of yellow and green and includes two faces or features on almost every initial as well as numerous additional flourishes. Other features include numerous foliate borders (especially at the front) that have been lightly sketched in red ink and left unfinished. On leaf 197, echoing an earlier MISERERE on folio 65 lettered in pink, red, blue, green, and yellow, there is a colophon written in capitals in the same colors: COMPLETUS EST ISTE LIBER PSALMORUM ANNO DOMINI M.CCCC.LXXIII. On the verso of leaf 199, under some additional prayers in Latin and German, is written: Yt der Psalter gehort st. [bridget?] stromer in wem er wird der pet. und [illeg.] durch gotts willeÉ miiiicmlxxxiii [presuumably 1483]. On leaf 80 in the bas-de-page there are two vertical scrolls with four tiny panels enclosing letters thus: on the left AE / EO / TIT / SC in red and yellow and on the right what look to be two-letter Hebrew inscriptions. Leaf 50 has some additional music written in the margin in a very early hand, and a loose leaf of later music in German is at the front. And finally, after the calendar there are two prayers in German, to Anthoni abbati and to Benedicti abbati, which might help locate the manuscript more precisely.& & The manuscript was most likely written in south Germany for Dominican use. The Calendar singles out St. Thomas Aquinas (7 March, with octave and translation on 28 January), St. Vincent Ferrer (5 April, he was canonised in 1455) and St. Peter Martyr (29 April); it also the Dominican anniversaries of oneÕs father and mother (4 February), Benefactors of the Order (5 September), and Brothers of the Order (10 October). Saint Sebald (19 August), the rare St. Cunegund of Bamberg (twice, 3 March and 9 September) and the even rarer St. Otto of Bamberg (30 September).& & The text comprises a blank, followed by the calendar (2-7), one leaf of prayers in German (8), Pater Noster and other prayers (9-10), a ferial Psalter (11r-169v) interspersed with antiphons with music, followed by canticles, hymns, a litany etc. and closing with later prayers in Latin and German and notes of ownership (see above). The manuscript bears several similarities to lot 80 in SothebyÕs sale London, June 20, 1995, though that lot was much less elaborate and quite imperfect. & & The provenance includes Brigitta Stromerin (1483), Maria Rosalia Chweiggartin (early 16th century, perhaps for whom it was rebound), an unidentified English or American bookseller (description pasted in c. 1900), the Friels of Ohio (20th century), and a private collector in California. With regard to the provenance I have been informed by the German scholar Sieglinde Sepp that Ã’I am now rather sure, that P(B)rigitta Stromerin was a nun of the Dominican abbey of St. Katharina (Katharinenkloster) at Nuremberg (diocesis of Bamberg. I think that the connection with Bamberg is given by the calendar in the psalter?). In the book "Handschriftenerbe des deutschen Mittelalters" Vol 2, on p. 613-625 there is a list of manuscripts, which formerly belonged to this abbey (now in many libraries around the world). I found a manuscript, now at Berlin, Preu§ische Staatsbibliothek, Germ. 8¡467 (miscellany of theological texts from about 1441), written by Johannes Schyller, ownership: Brigitta Stromerin. According to the catalogue description of this manuscript by Degering Brigitta Stromerin was a Dominican nun at St. Katharina.Ó

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller]
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         Historia naturalis.

      Rom, Konrad Sweynheym und Arnold Pannartz, 7.V.1473.. 1 w. Bl., 397 (statt 400) nn. Bl., 1 w. Bl.. Mit 7 großen (siebenzeilig) und 105 kleineren (zweizeilig) Blattgold-Initialen auf Grün- und Purpurgrund mit weiß-gelber floraler Musterung sowie zahlr. eingemalten Lombarden ind Rot oder Blau. Folio (38,5 x 27 cm). Zeitgenössischer blindgeprägter Kalbslederband auf Holzdeckeln und 4 Doppelbünden, mit 4 floralen, ziselierten und durchbrochenen Messing-Schließenankern.. Druck in römischer Type und 46 Zeilen, breitrandiges Exemplar dieses enzyklopädisch bedeutsamsten Werkes der antiken Naturgeschichte, das 1469 zum ersten Mal bei Johannes von Spira in Venedig im Druck erschien. Vorliegende Ausgabe ist die vierte gedruckte überhaupt und die zweite bei Sweynheym und Pannartz (sie trennten sich nach diesem Projekt) und seltener als deren erste; kein Exemplar im Jahrbuch der Auktionspreise; nur 2 Exemplare in Bibliotheken des dt. Sprachraumes sowie ein Exemplar im British Museum nachweisbar (BSB und ÖNB), vgl. KVK (Stand Mai 2014). Es fehlen das Doppelblatt B4/B7 sowie das Titelblatt; letzteres wurde im 19. Jahrhundert durch eine akkurat ausgeführte Handschschrift ersetzt (vgl. Abbildung), die geziert von eine farb. Initiale umrahmt ist mit einer farb. Bordüre (nur zur Hälfte ausgeführt). Einband berieben und bestoßen; auf Vorderdeckel mit größeren Bezugsfehlstellen; Deckel mit Wurmlöchern; Rücken im 19. Jhdt unter Verwendung des alten Materials erneuert; die beweglichen Schließen fehlen. Im ersten Viertel die obere Ecke wasserrandig und teils sporfleckig (das erste weiße Bl. stärker); im ersten Viertel mit kleinem Wurmloch am Fußrand; teils und meist im weißen Rand etwas stock- oder wasserfleckig; einige saubere, zeitgenöss. Glossen. Auf vorderem Spiegel zeitgenössische, fünfzeilige Glosse (leider durch Feuchtigkeit nur teilweise lesbar) mit Erwähnung des Cosimo von Medici und des Marchese Francesco de Monte S. Maria. Provenienz: Aus dem Besitz des Florentiner Historikers und Bibliophilen Gustavo Camillo Galletti (1805-1868), mit dessen Stempel auf dem ergänzten ersten Bl. sowie seinem hs. Besitzeintrag auf Vorderspiegel. GW M34308; Goff P 789; BSB P-602; BMC IV, 17.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat am Moritzberg]
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         Speculum historiale. Blatt aus: Secundi Voluminis Liber Nonus (GWM 50587, C 6246)

      Straßburg, Johann Mentelin, 4. Dezember 1473. Type 8.. Zweispaltiges, 72-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit Liber-Nummer in roter Schrift, vier roten u. blauen Lombarden, roten Versalien, rot unterstrichenen Titeln und hellbraun gestrichenen Versalbuchstaben. Blatt im Steg etwas braunrandig und mit kleineren Einrissen. Wasserzeichen Mond mit Beizeichen Stern einkonturig. Lagenbezeichnung und zwei kleine Nadelmontagelöcher im Rand. Blattgröße: 32 x 47 cm.. Das sehr breitrandige Inkunabelblatt weist in der unteren rechte Ecke (r) eine mit Hand eingedruckte Lagenbezeichnung "a i" auf. Diese Praxis hat Mentelin nur zwischen 1472 und 1474 angewendet. (Schorbach 1932, 100) Diese Signatur aus der Druckerei Mentelin ist ein frühes Beispiel. Erstmals wurden Signaturen von Johann Koelhoff d. Ä. in Köln im Jahre 1472 verwendet. Das Papier mit dem Wasserzeichen Stern über hängendem Mond verwendet Mentelin nur in seinen Speculum-Drucken historiale und morale. Papiere mit diesem Wasserzeichen wurden großformatig und in hervorragender Qualität im Piemont produziert. (Schorbach 1932, 84) Die beiden Nadelmontagelöcher stehen sich im oberen und unteren Rand gegenüber und hielten das Blatt während des Druckvorgangs. Das Werk ist unter folgendem Link online einsehbar: http://dfg-viewer.de/show/?set[mets]=http%3A%2F%2Fdaten.digitale-sammlungen.de%2F~db%2Fmets%2Fbsb00035799_mets.xml

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         Pantheologia sive summa universae theologiae. (GW M36929, H 13015).

      Nürnberg, Johann Sensenschmidt und Heinrich Kefer (Keffer), 8. April 1473. Type 2.. Zweispaltiges, 57-zeiliges Original-Inkunabelblatt mit einer 21-zeiligen kolorierten floralverzierten Initiale, zwei roten dreizeiligen Lombarden und zahlreichen rotverzierten Versalbuchstaben. Sauberes Blatt mit ledernem Seitenreiter. Blattgröße: 28,5 x 40,5 cm. Incunabula text leaf.. Dekoratives Blatt aus dem seltenen, gemeinsamen Druck von Sensenschmidt und Keffer. In diesem Druck wird Keffer erstmals namentlich in einem Impressum genannt. Sensenschmidt hatwie Keffer, das Buchdruckerhandwerk wohl in Mainz erlernt und war vermutlich auch am Druck der 36zeiligen Bibel in Bamberg beteiligt. Reynerus de Pisis, ein Lektor und Prediger in der ersten Hälfte des XIV. Jahrhunderts zu Pisa, hat aus den Schriften der älteren bedeutsamen Theologen ein Werk über das gesamte theologische Wissen in alphabetischer Reihenfolge zusammengestellt, welches später den Namen "Pantheologia" erhielt. Keffer wird im Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke mit nur 3 Drucken angegeben, die er immer zusammen mit Sensenschmidt ausführte. Da Keffer im Helmaspergerschen Notariatsinstrument als Vertreter Gutenbergs genannt wird, ist er nicht Fust-Schöffer zuzuordnen. Keffer hat 1459 Mainz verlassen und hat seit Anfang der 70er Jahre als Genosse Johann Sensenschmidt in Nürnberg eine Druckerrei betrieben. Für Geldner kommt Keffer als "Erster", als Leiter der Druckerei der 36-zeiligen Bamberger Bibel in Frage. (vgl. Geldner 1968, Band I, 48 u. 161) Ein weiteres Inkunabelblatt dieser Ausgabe mit 4 dreizeiligen roten Lombarden bieten wir zum Preis von 190,- Euro an. Ein Bild dieses Inkunabelblattes senden wir Ihnen auf Wunsch gerne per email zu.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         Singularia cum allegationibus (Singularia juris, secundum alphabetum ordinata) (GWM34972, IBE 4732). Blatt 71/ 72.

      (Segovia), Johannes Parix de Heydelberga, 1473, Type 1 (111R).. Einspaltiges, 34-zeilige O-Inkunabelblatt. Blatt mit 5 Wurmlöchern im Randbereich, Blatt etwas fleckig und Sammlerstempel im unteren Randbereich, Blattgröße: 20,5 x 29,5 cm. Leaf, text.. Rara! Sehr selten! Ein Blatt aus der Ersten Druckerei Spaniens, die von dem Deutschen Drucker Johann Parix aus Heidelberg im Jahre 1472 in Segovia (Aguilafuente) gegründet wurde. Odriozola und ordnet Parix acht Bücher zu, die er in Segovia zwischen 1472 und 1474 druckte. Alle acht Bücher aus Segovia druckte er mit einer einzigen Type, seiner "111R". 1474 verlegt Juan Parix seinen Druckort nach Toulouse. Das hier angebotene Blatt aus dem "Segovianer Pontanus" gehört nach Odriozola zum sechsten (IBE 4733), in Segovia gedruckten Werk und gehört in die Frühzeit des spanischen Buchdruckes (Protoincunables). (vgl. Antonio Odriozola: Los protoincunables (1472-1479) impresos por Juan Parix en Segovia (Espana) y Toulouse (Francia) In : Gutenberg-Jahrbuch 1976, 130ff.) Der Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke verzeichnet von Johann Parix 46 Drucke, die er mehrheitlich ab 1474 in Toulouse druckte. Die "Singularia iuris" beinhaltet kurze juristische Hinweise für Laien. (Juan Parix Primer impresor en Espana 2004, p. 298) Das Blatt ist online einsehbar unter folgendem Link: http://bibliotecadigitalhispanica.bne.es:80/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIGITOOL-3&owner=resourcediscovery&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=1604808 Blatt 71 und 72. Hoja rara de la primera imprenta de Espana, que fue fundada por el impresor aleman "Magister Iohannes Parix de Heydelberga" en el ano 1472 en Segovia (Aguilafuerte). Odriozola anota que Parix imprimo entre 1472 y 1474 ocho libros en Segovia. Desde el ano 1474 el empieza a imprimir en Toulouse. La hoja del "Pontanus de Segovia" (IBE 4733) aqui ofrecida, es del sexto libro impresso en Segovia y pertenece al tiempo de los protoincunables de Espana. (comp. Antonio Odriozola: Los protoincunables (1472-1479) impresos por Juan Parix en Segovia (Espana) y Toulouse (Francia) En : Gutenberg-Jahrbuch 1976, 130ff.). El catalogo aleman de los impresos del siglo XV. (Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke) anota en total 46 impresos de Parix. " La singularia iuris es un conjunto de estudios breves del autor, por lo que esta en la linea de obras de caracter juridico que ayudarian a entender el derecho a no iniciados ". (Juan Parix Primer impresor en Espana 2004, p. 298) La hoja es visible bajo la siguente direccion: http://bibliotecadigitalhispanica.bne.es:80/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIGITOOL-3&owner=resourcediscovery&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=1604808 y es la hoja 71/ 72

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         De claris mulieribus (GW 04483, H 3329, Schramm V 46, 47). Blatt XXXV De Cassandra, Cap. xxxiii, De Clitemestra Cap. xxxiiii.

      Ulm, Johann Zainer d. Ä., 1473. Type 1.. Einspaltiges, 33-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit zwei Holzschnitten (ein Holzschnitt mit Cassandra vor Troya und ein Holzschnitt mit Clitemestra, Agamenon und Porestes, 11,1 x 7,8 cm), einer Randglosse und zwei 4-zeiligen Holzschnitt-Initialen. Ein Wurmloch im Randbereich. Blattgröße: 26,5 x 19,4 cm. Incunabula text woodcut leaf.. Diese lateinische Druckausgabe ist nicht nur die Erstausgabe von Boccaccios Lebensbeschreibungen berühmter Frauen aus Sage u. Geschichte, sondern auch das erste reichillustrierte Werk, das Zainers Presse verließ. Zainer führte in diesem Druck erstmals die römische Blattzählung ein. Das Gesamtwerk umfasst 79 verschiedene Holzschnitte, von denen dieses Blatt zwei verschiedene enthält.Das Blatt ist online einsehbar: http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0002/bsb00029099/images/index.html?id=00029099&fip=93.220.239.154&no=7&seite=78 Bereits ein Jahr später erschien, erneut bei Zainer, die erste deutsche Ausgabe, in der er den größten Teil der Holzschnitte der lateinische Ausgabe wiederverwendete.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         Speculum humanae salvationis cum speculo S. Mariae Virginis (lateinisch u. deutsch). (GWM 43054, H 14929, Schramm II, 498 und 499).

      Augsburg, Günther Zainer, 1473 oder St. Ulrich und Afra. Type 2.. Einspaltiges, 34-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit zwei altkolorierten Holzschnitten (11,8 x 7,2 cm). Im Randbereich etw. fingerfleckig. Wasserzeichen: Ochsenkopf mit Kreuz- und Blumenstandarte. Blattgröße: 20 x 29,4 cm. Incunabula text woodcut leaf.. Blatt aus der Erstausgabe des Speculum humanae. Der Inkunabelkatalog (INKA) und der bvb geben an, dass das Werk im Kloster St. Ulrich und Afra gedruckt wurde. Die beiden Holzschnittdarstellungen sind betitelt: "Eyn Weyb erlößt die stat Saba von moyses handen" und "Abymelech der kunig ward von eynem weyb mit eynem steyn durch seyn hyrn geworffen". Das Blatt ist in der digitalen Bibliothek bvb einsehbar:http://mdz1.bib-bvb.de/~db/0003/bsb00031706/images/index.html?seite=437

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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         "Ungarn (Matthias Corvinus) 1473 (1472)-1477 [...] Erblande ". Manuskript.

      O. O. u. D.. 180 Bll. 4to.. Sammlung von Abschriften aus Briefen und sonstigen Urkunden betr. die Herrschaft des ungarischen Königs und die "Erblande" (Kap. CCXLVIII-CCCVIII, 1473-1477). Das am linken oberen Rand etwas eigentümlich paginierte bzw. foliierte Manuskript weist rechts eine fortlaufende Numerierung in arabischen Ziffern auf und umfaßt die Seiten 407 bis 622 (407 bis 439, 1 l. Bl.; 440 bis 462; 466 bis 481, 1 l. Bl.; 490 bis 518; 529 bis 532; 539 bis 547;552 bis 590, 1 l. Bl.; 699 bis 607, 1 l. Bl.; 608 bis 622). Als Skriptor dürfte zum überwiegenden Teil Wurzbach zu identifizieren sein; daneben war zumindest ein weiterer Schreiber damit beschäftigt, die in staatlichen Archiven aufbewahrten Unterlagen abzuschreiben.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris, Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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         Von etlichen frowen.

      Ulm, Johann Zainer, um 1473.. Daraus Blatt c [100] mit 2 kolorierten Holzschnitten.. Die beiden altkolorierten Holzschnitte zeigen auf der Vorderseite die Königstochter Beronice, die ihren Bruder mit dem Schwert tötet und damit den Mord an ihrem Mann und ihren beiden kleinen Söhnen rächt. Auf der Rückseite die erste gedruckte Darstellung einer Vergewaltigung: Die Ehefrau des Königs Drigiagontis wird in römischer Gefangenschaft vom bewachenden Hauptmann zum Liebesdienst gezwungen (linke Bildhälfte). Nach ihrer Befreiung rächt sie die Schmach und überbringt ihrem Gatten das Haupt des Schänders (rechte Bildhälfte). Unterhalb der beiden Darst. Text mit jeweils einer kolor. Holzschn.-Initiale. - Breitrandig, im w. Rand gering fleckig u. knitterig sowie im seitl. Rand hinterlegter Einriß. - GW 4486. Hain 3333. Schramm V, 76 u. 77.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris, Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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         Ethica ad Nicomachum. Oeconomica. Politica

      Translated by Leonardus Brunus Aretinus. Roman type, 24 lines, capital spaces & spaces for headings. 116 unnumbered leaves; 8 unnumbered leaves; 135 unnumbered leaves (of 136, lacking the final blank). Three parts in one vol. Small folio (300 x 207 mm.), very expertly restored contemporary Spanish mudéjar-style binding of brown calf over wooden boards (some slight occasional marginal staining at head), three raised bands, covers decorated with an inset roll-tooled border of interlacing strapwork, intricate blind-tooled geometric designs to central panels. [Valencia: Lambert Palmart, later months of 1473 or, at the latest, early 1474]. An important rarity: this undated book can lay claim to being the first book printed on the Iberian Peninsula. George D. Painter suggests in his "General Introduction" to the tenth volume of the British Museum catalogue of incunabula that it is this book or the Barcelona Aristotle" with which Spanish printing may perhaps have begun" (p. xi). The early history of printing in Spain has long remained opaque, owing to the lack of explicit colophons as evidence. The earliest dated works in Spain are all from 1475 with books issued in Valencia by Palmart, Zaragoza by Matthaeus Flander, and Barcelona by Johannes de Salsburga and Paulus (Hurus) de Constantia. However, there are certain books or groups of books, containing neither date, place, nor name of printer which may have been produced by presses at Segovia, Barcelona, and Valencia before 1475. Only one thing is certain: there is no absolute certainty regarding which book is the first to be printed in Spain (this lack of clarity is made evident in the B.M.C.'s "Introduction to the Presses" by Leslie A. Sheppard and George D. Painter, p. xxxvi). Several are candidates for this honor, including our edition of Aristotle, printed by Lambert Palmart in Valencia. At the least, it is one of the very first books printed on the Iberian Peninsula. The first printers in Spain were Germans who, not knowing Spanish, chose mainly Latin texts in their early years on the peninsula. Little is known about Palmart except that he was a native of the diocese of Cologne and had studied at the University of Paris, receiving a degree of bachelor in 1466 and that of master of arts subsequently. His chief rival for printing the first book in Spain is Henricus Botel, already a master printer, who came to Spain under contract to teach Georgius vom Holtz and Johannes Planck the art of printing (a copy of a contract between them, dated 5 January 1473, survives). Both Palmart and Botel chose the same texts of Aristotle as their first productions but clearly used different manuscripts (there was a considerable demand for these texts, both in Catalonia and in other parts of Spain). It is interesting to note that B.M.C. is not completely certain that Botel's Aristotle was printed in Barcelona or even that it was printed by Botel: "Neither the date, nor the place, nor even the press of the ["Botel"] Aristotle is entirely certain" (p. xxxix). The existence of a Segovia press of ca. 1472-73 remains conjectural. Lawrence Witten, in his article "The Earliest Books Printed in Spain" in Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, Vol. 53 (1959), pp. 91-113, demonstrates that our Aristotle cannot have been printed after 1474. While Witten favors the Barcelona Aristotle -- which, at the time of his article's appearance, was considered to be printed in Zaragoza -- as earlier than the Valencia Aristotle, his reasoning is not entirely convincing to this writer. Indeed, later in his article (p. 109) Witten contradicts himself by stating that the two editions were printed approximately simultaneously. On page 110 of his article, Witten also states that our Valencia Aristotle is one of the "candidates for the earliest Spanish book." The present book, while a handsome folio, has a typographically early appearance. There is a very remarkable sparsity of punctuation throughout, notably at the end of sentences, paragraphs, and major divisions of text. Its wide leading indicates it was designed to receive interlinear annotations. There are a number of dropped letters and sagging lines. It also contains irregular line-endings on many pages and variations in the width of the type-page. The types resemble those used by Bertholdus Rihing at Naples and suggest that Palmart had some contact with the presses of the Naples region and may well have moved to Spain from there. The watermarks include three kinds of hand-and-star paper (6-ray, 5-ray, and peculiarly forked 4-ray) and the arms of Valencia. A fine and unpressed copy with a little faint spotting towards end. This is a very rare book: there are seven copies in Spain (two imperfect), three in the United Kingdom (one at the British Library; two at the Bodleian, of which one is imperfect), one in Belgium, and two in the United States (at the Hispanic Society of America, and one in a private collection). Laurence Witten's copies of both Botel's and Palmart's editions are now those held by the BL. ❧ B.M.C., X, pp. 14-15. Goff A-985. ISTC ia00985000. See also George D. Painter's "The First Press at Barcelona" in Gutenberg Jahrbuch (1962), pp. 136-49 for an excellent account of the two Aristotles. Another important article is Jordi Rubió's paper in the Gutenberg Jahrbuch of 1960. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Single Leaf from Beavais’ Speculum historiale]

      Strasbourg: Johann Mentelin, 1473. The page is from the second edition of this work, printed in Strasbourg by Johann Mentelin in 1473. Printed, in black ink, on both sides in double columns containing 62 lines in thick roman script. Many of the capital letters are touched in yellow ink and there are paragraph rubrics in red as well as large rubricated capitals in red and blue. The leaf is headlined XXXI on one side in red and II on the other in blue. Folio, approx 18 by 12 inches, handsomely mounted in cream boards ruled in yellow and red Single leaf. Extremely well preserved, fine and very handsome. VERY RARE EARLY INCUNABULA BY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PRINTERS OF THE EARLY RENAISSANCE. Vincent of Beauvais was a Dominican friar who left the monastic life and eventually became lector and chaplain to the court of the French King Louis the IX. It was under such patronage that he undertook the task of writing three huge encyclopedias which he intended to include the sum of all knowledge from the time of creation to his own present day. The three major works were divided into the Speculum Majus, the Speculum Doctrinale and the Speculum Historiale. The last, despite its name, is not as much a historical overview as much as it is metaphysical commentary on religion, faith and other things supernatural. It is often regarded as the most personal and introspective of the three works and includes (as do the other two) pieces of poetry and music, possibly written by the author himself. Despite its many omissions and fallacies, all three sections of the Speculum were an influence and inspiration to poets and writers for centuries afterward, and was especially important to many of the Romantic writers, with Lord Byron often citing him as a primary influence.

      [Bookseller: Buddenbrooks, Inc.]
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         INCUNABLE. [MODUS PERVENIENDI AD SUMMAM SAPIENTIAM.] 1473

      Augsburg: Gunther Zainer,. Very Good with no dust jacket. 1473. First Edition. Hardcover. Folio 13" - 23" tall; Incunable. [Modus Perveniendi Ad Summam Sapientiam. ] [Augsburg: Gunther Zainer, c1473. ] Folio, modern library bds. 22 (of 24) leaves. 285 x 196 mm- sheet size. 33 lines to the page. Occasional minor annotations and light dust soiling to leaf 1. Text generally clean. Goff M-762 - recording 2 copies; BMC II, p320 (Ib 5551) ; Hain 11490. Only 15th century edition. Rubricated intials. Folio. Quires [1-210, 34], 33 lines to the page, gothic letter, without signatures, catchwords or pagination, place, printer's name or date. Two- to four-line spaces left for capitals, which are supplied in red. Initial-strokes in red. Hain *11490. Brit. Mus. 15th cent. , II, p. 320 (IB. 5531). Provenance- Mt St Alphonsus collection. The book to bring wisdom. .

      [Bookseller: poor mans books]
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        Astronomicon

      Roman letter, 72 leaves, 30 lines, five fine woodcut initials with a white interlaced branchwork design on a black ground. Guide letters for the smaller initials. Small 4to (200 x 147 mm.), antique blindstamped calf (extreme inner margins of five or six leaves expertly & almost invisibly strengthened, verso of final leaf a little dusty). Nuremberg: Johann Müller of Königsberg (Regiomontanus), [ca. 1473-74]. First edition of the first printed book on astronomy; of the greatest rarity with only two other copies having appeared at auction in the last fifty years. "The work of Manilius was the main exemplar of that 'poetic astronomy' which exerted such a powerful influence on German humanist thought from Regiomontanus to Conrad Celtis and beyond."-Rose, The Italian Renaissance of Mathematics, p. 105. Regiomontanus envisioned the new invention of the printing press as one of the chief means of restoring mathematics and astronomy. It was this book and the others in Regiomontanus' publishing program with which he formally launched the renaissance of astronomy and mathematics, issuing the most important texts in edited and corrected editions. The Astronomicon describes the sphere, zodiacal and other constellations, great circles, comets, and astral influences on human beings. It put forward a number of sound astronomical hypotheses, especially relating to the nature of the stars, and became an important textbook, representing the most advanced views on astronomy of ancient Roman times. The text of the poem, composed in the first century A.D., had only recently been discovered when it received this, its first printing. This book was printed at the press of Regiomontanus, the foremost astronomer of the time, who established the first observatory in Europe, and was the first publisher of astronomical and mathematical literature. He had finally settled in Nuremberg after a career in Italy under Cardinal Bessarion and, more recently in Vienna, as librarian to Mathias Corvinus. The press was probably a private one and not a commercial office; it was the first scientific publishing house. Its output was limited to some ten titles, all issued within a year and a half, of which this is the only one to bear a full colophon. The type, apparently never used again, seems to have been cut in imitation of the smaller type of Sweynheym and Pannartz at Rome. It is amongst the most elegant of the early roman types used in Germany. This and the second edition (Bologna: ca. 1474) were printed from independent sources. The great modern editor of Manilius, A.E. Housman, considered this the more important textually and believed that Regiomontanus must have corrected the text himself as so many corrections are not to be found in any surviving manuscript (Housman, V, p. xvii). Neither of Manilius' other great editors, Scaliger and Bentley, knew of this edition, and so Regiomontanus' corrections were incorporated into the text only in the 20th century. This is an extremely rare book. As we have mentioned above, only two other copies have appeared at auction in the past fifty years. The ISTC-in-progress records only the Chapin, Harvard, Huntington, and Morgan Library copies in the U.S. Fine copy. 18th-century crowned stamp on outer margin of title and foot of final leaf. ❧ B.M.C., II, p. 456. Goff M-202. Klebs 661.1. Lalande, p. 9-"Le premier livre d'astronomie qu'on imprima." Stillwell, The Awakening Interest in Science during the First Century of Printing 1450-1550, 75. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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