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         TEXT FROM BEGINNING OF TERCE

      Low Countries [probably Bruges], ca. 1460. This is an extremely well executed and charming miniature painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Holy Family en route to Egypt, with the Virgin carrying her son on the back of an ass, and Joseph on foot carrying their meager belongings. The grisaille technique used in this miniature points to the skill and quality of the artist, as silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14th through the end of the 15th century. Sometimes, as in the present case, naturalistic color (light browns and golds, pinks, blues, and even a dash of red on Joseph's hat) would be added, resulting in a technique called demi- (or semi-) grisaille.. 93 x 139 mm. (3 5/8 x 5 1/2"). Single column, 15 lines in an Italianate gothic rotunda. Rubrics in red, one-line initials in blue or gold with red or blue penwork, two-line initials in gold on blue and gold ground, a splendid five-line initial painted blue with branchwork decoration on a gold ground, A FULL PAGE DEMI-GRISAILLE MINIATURE depicting the Flight into Egypt within an arched compartment, WITH FULL BORDERS of acanthus leaves, flowers, vine-stems, and bezants, all painted in a demi-grisaille fashion. A few small chips to the paint, one-line initials slightly smudged, and with some minor smudging in the margins, but A BEAUTIFUL SPECIMEN, WITH CRISP DETAIL AND IN AN EXCELLENT STATE OF PRESERVATION. This is an extremely well executed and charming miniature painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Holy Family en route to Egypt, with the Virgin carrying her son on the back of an ass, and Joseph on foot carrying their meager belongings. The grisaille technique used in this miniature points to the skill and quality of the artist, as silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14th through the end of the 15th century. Sometimes, as in the present case, naturalistic color (light browns and golds, pinks, blues, and even a dash of red on Joseph's hat) would be added, resulting in a technique called demi- (or semi-) grisaille.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 1.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         TEXT FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE ADVENT HOURS OF THE VIRGIN

      Low Countries [probably Bruges], ca. 1460. This charming miniature was painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his rather routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part probably because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Coronation of the Virgin within an architectural setting. Mary is shown kneeling upon a starry pillow with three angels attending her, and Christ enthroned in front of her. The grisaille technique used here also points to the skill and quality of the artist. Silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy, and it was perfected by those artists in the Low Countries that were patronized by the Dukes of Burgundy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14th through the end of the 15th century. Sometimes, as in the present case, naturalistic color (light browns and golds, pinks, blues, and even dashes of green and red on the textiles here) will be added, resulting in a technique called demi-grisaille.. the bifolium measuring 94 x 140 mm. (3 5/8 x 5 1/2"). Single column, 15 lines in an Italianate gothic rotunda. Rubrics in red, one-line initials in blue or gold with red or blue penwork, two-line initials in gold on blue and gold ground, a splendid five-line initial painted blue with branchwork decoration on a gold ground, A FULL-PAGE DEMI-GRISAILLE MINIATURE depicting the Coronation of the Virgin within an arched compartment, WITH FULL BORDERS of acanthus leaves, flowers, vine-stems, and bezants, along with a charming bird in both full borders, all painted in a demi-grisaille fashion (the miniature with no text below and blank on the back). Red letters in the script a little faded, a series of small rust stains in the margin between the attached leaves, tiny moments of trivial soiling, but A BEAUTIFUL SPECIMEN, WITH CRISP DETAIL AND IN AN VERY FINE STATE OF PRESERVATION, with virtually no sign of erosion in the paint or gold. This charming miniature was painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his rather routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part probably because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Coronation of the Virgin within an architectural setting. Mary is shown kneeling upon a starry pillow with three angels attending her, and Christ enthroned in front of her. The grisaille technique used here also points to the skill and quality of the artist. Silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy, and it was perfected by those artists in the Low Countries that were patronized by the Dukes of Burgundy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14th through the end of the 15th century. Sometimes, as in the present case, naturalistic color (light browns and golds, pinks, blues, and even dashes of green and red on the textiles here) will be added, resulting in a technique called demi-grisaille.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 2.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         TEXT FROM BEGINNING OF TERCE

      ca. 1460, Low Countries [probably Bruges] - 93 x 139 mm. (3 5/8 x 5 1/2"). Single column, 15 lines in an Italianate gothic rotunda. Rubrics in red, one-line initials in blue or gold with red or blue penwork, two-line initials in gold on blue and gold ground, a splendid five-line initial painted blue with branchwork decoration on a gold ground, A FULL PAGE DEMI-GRISAILLE MINIATURE depicting the Flight into Egypt within an arched compartment, WITH FULL BORDERS of acanthus leaves, flowers, vine-stems, and bezants, all painted in a demi-grisaille fashion. A few small chips to the paint, one-line initials slightly smudged, and with some minor smudging in the margins, but A BEAUTIFUL SPECIMEN, WITH CRISP DETAIL AND IN AN EXCELLENT STATE OF PRESERVATION. This is an extremely well executed and charming miniature painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Holy Family en route to Egypt, with the Virgin carrying her son on the back of an ass, and Joseph on foot carrying their meager belongings. The grisaille technique used in this miniature points to the skill and quality of the artist, as silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14th through the end of the 15th century. Sometimes, as in the present case, naturalistic color (light browns and golds, pinks, blues, and even a dash of red on Joseph's hat) would be added, resulting in a technique called demi- (or semi-) grisaille. This is an extremely well executed and charming miniature painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Holy Family en route to Egypt, with the Virgin carrying her son on the back of an ass, and Joseph on foot carrying their meager belongings. The grisaille technique used in this miniature points to the skill and quality of the artist, as silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14t

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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         TEXT FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE ADVENT HOURS OF THE VIRGIN

      Low Countries [probably Bruges]: , ca. 1460. Low Countries [probably Bruges], ca. 1460. This charming miniature was painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his rather routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part probably because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Coronation of the Virgin within an architectural setting. Mary is shown kneeling upon a starry pillow with three angels attending her, and Christ enthroned in front of her. The grisaille technique used here also points to the skill and quality of the artist. Silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy, and it was perfected by those artists in the Low Countries that were patronized by the Dukes of Burgundy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14th through the end of the 15th century. Sometimes, as in the present case, naturalistic color (light browns and golds, pinks, blues, and even dashes of green and red on the textiles here) will be added, resulting in a technique called demi-grisaille.. the bifolium measuring 94 x 140 mm. (3 5/8 x 5 1/2"). Single column, 15 lines in an Italianate gothic rotunda. Rubrics in red, one-line initials in blue or gold with red or blue penwork, two-line initials in gold on blue and gold ground, a splendid five-line initial painted blue with branchwork decoration on a gold ground, A FULL-PAGE DEMI-GRISAILLE MINIATURE depicting the Coronation of the Virgin within an arched compartment, WITH FULL BORDERS of acanthus leaves, flowers, vine-stems, and bezants, along with a charming bird in both full borders, all painted in a demi-grisaille fashion (the miniature with no text below and blank on the back).Red letters in the script a little faded, a series of small rust stains in the margin between the attached leaves, tiny moments of trivial soiling, but A BEAUTIFUL SPECIMEN, WITH CRISP DETAIL AND IN AN VERY FINE STATE OF PRESERVATION, with virtually no sign of erosion in the paint or gold.This charming miniature was painted by an artist clearly indebted to Willem Vrelant (active in Bruges ca. 1454-81), but far better than most of his rather routine imitators. The various Vrelant-style artists have never been fully defined, in part probably because--as copious documentation reveals--he worked with family members and apprentices, who doubtless collaborated with him on manuscripts, and probably also on individual miniatures. This particular bifolium comes from a Book of Hours sold at Christie's in 1994 (and subsequently broken up before we obtained the bifolium), the description for which notes that it was "also containing possibly some of [Vrelant's] own work." The same description also suggests that the rounded Italianate style of script found here could indicate an Italian or Catalan patron (or perhaps a scribe with these connections). The present miniature depicts the Coronation of the Virgin within an architectural setting. Mary is shown kneeling upon a starry pillow with three angels attending her, and Christ enthroned in front of her. The grisaille technique used here also points to the skill and quality of the artist. Silver was a notoriously difficult color to deploy, and it was perfected by those artists in the Low Countries that were patronized by the Dukes of Burgundy. From the French word "gris," meaning "gray," grisaille refers to a style of monochrome painting, normally executed using a black pigment such as lampblack and an inert white pigment. The technique first appeared in the late 13th century and experienced its greatest period of popularity from the second half of the 14th through the end of the 15th century. Sometimes, as in the present case, naturalistic color (light browns and golds, pinks, blues, and even dashes of green and red on the textiles here) will be added, resulting in a technique called demi-grisaille.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 4.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         CATHOLICON. (TEXT FROM THE OPENING OF THE SECTION ON THE LETTER "O")

      [Mainz: Printer of the Catholicon (Johann Gutenberg?); Peter Schoeffer(?) for Konrad Humery(?), between 1460-72]. Already of intrinsic interest, this leaf from Gutenberg's "Catholicon" is extraordinarily attractive because of its historiation. While not as famous as its older brother, the 42-line (or "Gutenberg") Bible, the "Catholicon" is noted for being the first book to name its place of printing, and the first extensive work of a secular nature to be published. Compiled by the Dominican priest Johannes Balbus (or John of Genoa, d. ca. 1298), the text consists of a grammar and a dictionary of Medieval Latin, and treats the etymology of Latin terms in vogue during the Middle Ages. It was the first lexicographical work to be completely alphabetized. There were three impressions of the first edition, all with identical typesetting but distinguishable by the kind of paper used: the original 1460 version is either on vellum or Bull's Head paper, the 1469 second impression was printed on Galliziani paper, and the 1472 third impression was on Tower and Crown paper. Unfortunately, our leaf is from the half sheet without the watermark, and thus an exact date cannot be definitively determined. At the time, after a work like this had been printed, the type would have been distributed to be used for another book, and there would inevitably have been noticeable differences when it was reset for a later impression. The fact that the three impressions are identical is explained by Paul Needham, who has explained that our printer actually produced two-line slugs of cast type, and that these were used subsequently at two later times. This means that whenever our copy went through the press (in 1460, 1469, or 1472), it was printed on type that was produced ca. 1460. The prominent historiated initial here is a source of great pleasure, featuring a charming image of a tonsured and haloed monk with a slight smile on his face, holding a chalice and book. It opens the section of text that begins the letter "O," and it seems likely that similar decoration would have been found at the openings for other letters as well. Historiated initials like the one seen here were not normally employed in copies of the "Catholicon," or, for that matter, in very many books from this period, making this leaf a particularly special specimen.. 395 x 289 mm. (15 1/2 x 11 3/8"). Double column, 66 lines of text in gothic type. Secured in a mat with mounting tape along one vertical edge. Capitals struck in red, paragraph marks in red, numerous one-line initials in red, blue, or green, and A 10-LINE INTERLOCKING HISTORIATED INITIAL ENCLOSING A TONSURED AND HALOED MONK holding a book and a chalice filled with wine, the whole decorated with green vine-stems and red penwork. Goff B-20; BMC I, 39. Two small chips out of the red portion of the puzzle initial, one upper corner with diagonal dampstain not entering the text, minor soiling and a hint of moisture at one edge or another, but the leaf without major condition issues, and the delightful initial itself in a fine state of preservation.Already of intrinsic interest, this leaf from Gutenberg's "Catholicon" is extraordinarily attractive because of its historiation. While not as famous as its older brother, the 42-line (or "Gutenberg") Bible, the "Catholicon" is noted for being the first book to name its place of printing, and the first extensive work of a secular nature to be published. Compiled by the Dominican priest Johannes Balbus (or John of Genoa, d. ca. 1298), the text consists of a grammar and a dictionary of Medieval Latin, and treats the etymology of Latin terms in vogue during the Middle Ages. It was the first lexicographical work to be completely alphabetized. There were three impressions of the first edition, all with identical typesetting but distinguishable by the kind of paper used: the original 1460 version is either on vellum or Bull's Head paper, the 1469 second impression was printed on Galliziani paper, and the 1472 third impression was on Tower and Crown paper. Unfortunately, our leaf is from the half sheet without the watermark, and thus an exact date cannot be definitively determined. At the time, after a work like this had been printed, the type would have been distributed to be used for another book, and there would inevitably have been noticeable differences when it was reset for a later impression. The fact that the three impressions are identical is explained by Paul Needham, who has explained that our printer actually produced two-line slugs of cast type, and that these were used subsequently at two later times. This means that whenever our copy went through the press (in 1460, 1469, or 1472), it was printed on type that was produced ca. 1460. The prominent historiated initial here is a source of great pleasure, featuring a charming image of a tonsured and haloed monk with a slight smile on his face, holding a chalice and book. It opens the section of text that begins the letter "O," and it seems likely that similar decoration would have been found at the openings for other letters as well. Historiated initials like the one seen here were not normally employed in copies of the "Catholicon," or, for that matter, in very many books from this period, making this leaf a particularly special specimen.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 5.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         USE OF ROME

      Netherlands: , ca. 1460. Netherlands, ca. 1460. Because of its historiation on such a small scale and its large collection of accessory texts and prayers, this diminutive Book of Hours is of special interest because of its immense decorative charm and textual complexity. In addition to the Hours of the Virgin integral to every Book of Hours, this volume contains three other major prayer cycles: the Hours of the Passion, the Hours of the Holy Spirit, and the Weekday Hours. The last was a specialty of 15th century Flemish Books of Hours and, as here, was often accompanied by an image cycle. As noted by Wieck in "Time Sanctified," the accompanying images reflect the devotion of that particular day: Sunday Hours of the Holy Trinity, Monday Hours of the Dead, Tuesday Hours of the Holy Spirit, Wednesday Hours of All Saints, Thursday Hours of the Holy Sacrament, Friday Hours of the Cross, and the Saturday Hours of the Virgin. The other major cycle of images here belongs to the Hours of the Virgin, and depicts the usual event for each hour: Annunciation, Visitation, Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds, Adoration of the Magi, Presentation in the Temple, Massacre of the Innocents, and the Flight into Egypt. The artist of these initials had very little space to work with, given the small dimensions of the page, but he met the challenge with considerable success; each initial displays a surprising amount of information about the figures and surroundings. The hand is practiced and confident, and the detail work quite clear. The figures make the most of the space they inhabit, and the overall impression is one of great delight and an unexpected degree of character. In addition to the formal cycles mentioned above, the present Book of Hours is further distinguished by an unusually large number of prayers, blessings, and readings, most of which give clues about how this particular book would have been used. Since a Book of Hours like this one would have been highly customizable, further study of these auxiliary texts could reveal much about the identity of the patron.. 90 x 63 mm. (3 1/2 x 2 1/2"). [343] leaves, single column, 17 lines, in a gothic book hand. Contents: 1r: (blank); 1v: Calendar with two charts and two diagrams in Dutch and Latin; 17r: Various prayers to Christ and meditations on the Passion (including the prayer to the Holy Face of Christ and "O Bone Jesu"); 24r: Hours of the Passion; 45r: Hours of the Virgin; 97-99: (three blank leaves); 100r: Various prayers to the Virgin (including "O Intemerata" and "Obsecro te"); 124r: Hours of the Holy Spirit, with masses; 124r: Weekday Hours, with masses; 188r: Seven Penitential Psalms and Litany; 208r: Office of the Dead; 245r: Suffrages; 274r: Various prayers; 310v: Seven verses of Saint Bernard; 312: (blank); 313r: Reading from 2 John describing the Passion, followed by various prayers; 328r: Prayers(?) in an informal hand; 329r: Fifteen Paternosters in Dutch; 339r: A rubric in Dutch followed by prayers in Dutch. Attractive 17th century dark brown morocco with extensive gilt tooling, covers and spine with a lacey circular motif surrounded by a halo of small flowers, all framed by floral borders and cornerpieces, original straps and brass clasps bearing a shell motif, all edges gilt with a painted (now faded) floral design. Rubrics in red, numerous one-line initials in red and blue, line-fillers in red and blue, "KL" of Kalends and numerous two-line initials gilt on blue and pink ground, many three-line initials and several larger initials (at major intervals) in combinations of red, blue, and gold, with floral decoration, 37 LEAVES WITH FULL FLORAL BORDERS of acanthus leaves, blossoms, gold dots, and vine-stem, and 19 HISTORIATED INITIALS (including one that is more of a half-page miniature).Leather with general minor wear, but the binding entirely sound and extremely pleasing. Borders with a little smudging and trimmed close at the fore edge (though the decoration grazed in just a few cases), vellum with light soiling here and there (more on the first and last few leaves), other quite minor signs of use, but THE CONTENTS VERY CLEAN OVERALL, AND THE HISTORIATED INITIALS WELL PRESERVED.Because of its historiation on such a small scale and its large collection of accessory texts and prayers, this diminutive Book of Hours is of special interest because of its immense decorative charm and textual complexity. In addition to the Hours of the Virgin integral to every Book of Hours, this volume contains three other major prayer cycles: the Hours of the Passion, the Hours of the Holy Spirit, and the Weekday Hours. The last was a specialty of 15th century Flemish Books of Hours and, as here, was often accompanied by an image cycle. As noted by Wieck in "Time Sanctified," the accompanying images reflect the devotion of that particular day: Sunday Hours of the Holy Trinity, Monday Hours of the Dead, Tuesday Hours of the Holy Spirit, Wednesday Hours of All Saints, Thursday Hours of the Holy Sacrament, Friday Hours of the Cross, and the Saturday Hours of the Virgin. The other major cycle of images here belongs to the Hours of the Virgin, and depicts the usual event for each hour: Annunciation, Visitation, Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds, Adoration of the Magi, Presentation in the Temple, Massacre of the Innocents, and the Flight into Egypt. The artist of these initials had very little space to work with, given the small dimensions of the page, but he met the challenge with considerable success; each initial displays a surprising amount of information about the figures and surroundings. The hand is practiced and confident, and the detail work quite clear. The figures make the most of the space they inhabit, and the overall impression is one of great delight and an unexpected degree of character. In addition to the formal cycles mentioned above, the present Book of Hours is further distinguished by an unusually large number of prayers, blessings, and readings, most of which give clues about how this particular book would have been used. Since a Book of Hours like this one would have been highly customizable, further study of these auxiliary texts could reveal much about the identity of the patron.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 6.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         CATHOLICON. (TEXT FROM THE OPENING OF THE SECTION ON THE LETTER "O")

      [Mainz: Printer of the Catholicon (Johann Gutenberg?); Peter Schoeffer(?) for Konrad Humery(?), between 1460-72]. Already of intrinsic interest, this leaf from Gutenberg's "Catholicon" is extraordinarily attractive because of its historiation. While not as famous as its older brother, the 42-line (or "Gutenberg") Bible, the "Catholicon" is noted for being the first book to name its place of printing, and the first extensive work of a secular nature to be published. Compiled by the Dominican priest Johannes Balbus (or John of Genoa, d. ca. 1298), the text consists of a grammar and a dictionary of Medieval Latin, and treats the etymology of Latin terms in vogue during the Middle Ages. It was the first lexicographical work to be completely alphabetized. There were three impressions of the first edition, all with identical typesetting but distinguishable by the kind of paper used: the original 1460 version is either on vellum or Bull's Head paper, the 1469 second impression was printed on Galliziani paper, and the 1472 third impression was on Tower and Crown paper. Unfortunately, our leaf is from the half sheet without the watermark, and thus an exact date cannot be definitively determined. At the time, after a work like this had been printed, the type would have been distributed to be used for another book, and there would inevitably have been noticeable differences when it was reset for a later impression. The fact that the three impressions are identical is explained by Paul Needham, who has explained that our printer actually produced two-line slugs of cast type, and that these were used subsequently at two later times. This means that whenever our copy went through the press (in 1460, 1469, or 1472), it was printed on type that was produced ca. 1460. The prominent historiated initial here is a source of great pleasure, featuring a charming image of a tonsured and haloed monk with a slight smile on his face, holding a chalice and book. It opens the section of text that begins the letter "O," and it seems likely that similar decoration would have been found at the openings for other letters as well. Historiated initials like the one seen here were not normally employed in copies of the "Catholicon," or, for that matter, in very many books from this period, making this leaf a particularly special specimen.. 395 x 289 mm. (15 1/2 x 11 3/8"). Double column, 66 lines of text in gothic type. Secured in a mat with mounting tape along one vertical edge. Capitals struck in red, paragraph marks in red, numerous one-line initials in red, blue, or green, and A 10-LINE INTERLOCKING HISTORIATED INITIAL ENCLOSING A TONSURED AND HALOED MONK holding a book and a chalice filled with wine, the whole decorated with green vine-stems and red penwork. Goff B-20; BMC I, 39. Two small chips out of the red portion of the puzzle initial, one upper corner with diagonal dampstain not entering the text, minor soiling and a hint of moisture at one edge or another, but the leaf without major condition issues, and the delightful initial itself in a fine state of preservation. Already of intrinsic interest, this leaf from Gutenberg's "Catholicon" is extraordinarily attractive because of its historiation. While not as famous as its older brother, the 42-line (or "Gutenberg") Bible, the "Catholicon" is noted for being the first book to name its place of printing, and the first extensive work of a secular nature to be published. Compiled by the Dominican priest Johannes Balbus (or John of Genoa, d. ca. 1298), the text consists of a grammar and a dictionary of Medieval Latin, and treats the etymology of Latin terms in vogue during the Middle Ages. It was the first lexicographical work to be completely alphabetized. There were three impressions of the first edition, all with identical typesetting but distinguishable by the kind of paper used: the original 1460 version is either on vellum or Bull's Head paper, the 1469 second impression was printed on Galliziani paper, and the 1472 third impression was on Tower and Crown paper. Unfortunately, our leaf is from the half sheet without the watermark, and thus an exact date cannot be definitively determined. At the time, after a work like this had been printed, the type would have been distributed to be used for another book, and there would inevitably have been noticeable differences when it was reset for a later impression. The fact that the three impressions are identical is explained by Paul Needham, who has explained that our printer actually produced two-line slugs of cast type, and that these were used subsequently at two later times. This means that whenever our copy went through the press (in 1460, 1469, or 1472), it was printed on type that was produced ca. 1460. The prominent historiated initial here is a source of great pleasure, featuring a charming image of a tonsured and haloed monk with a slight smile on his face, holding a chalice and book. It opens the section of text that begins the letter "O," and it seems likely that similar decoration would have been found at the openings for other letters as well. Historiated initials like the one seen here were not normally employed in copies of the "Catholicon," or, for that matter, in very many books from this period, making this leaf a particularly special specimen.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         USE OF ROME

      Netherlands, ca. 1460. Because of its historiation on such a small scale and its large collection of accessory texts and prayers, this diminutive Book of Hours is of special interest because of its immense decorative charm and textual complexity. In addition to the Hours of the Virgin integral to every Book of Hours, this volume contains three other major prayer cycles: the Hours of the Passion, the Hours of the Holy Spirit, and the Weekday Hours. The last was a specialty of 15th century Flemish Books of Hours and, as here, was often accompanied by an image cycle. As noted by Wieck in "Time Sanctified," the accompanying images reflect the devotion of that particular day: Sunday Hours of the Holy Trinity, Monday Hours of the Dead, Tuesday Hours of the Holy Spirit, Wednesday Hours of All Saints, Thursday Hours of the Holy Sacrament, Friday Hours of the Cross, and the Saturday Hours of the Virgin. The other major cycle of images here belongs to the Hours of the Virgin, and depicts the usual event for each hour: Annunciation, Visitation, Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds, Adoration of the Magi, Presentation in the Temple, Massacre of the Innocents, and the Flight into Egypt. The artist of these initials had very little space to work with, given the small dimensions of the page, but he met the challenge with considerable success; each initial displays a surprising amount of information about the figures and surroundings. The hand is practiced and confident, and the detail work quite clear. The figures make the most of the space they inhabit, and the overall impression is one of great delight and an unexpected degree of character. In addition to the formal cycles mentioned above, the present Book of Hours is further distinguished by an unusually large number of prayers, blessings, and readings, most of which give clues about how this particular book would have been used. Since a Book of Hours like this one would have been highly customizable, further study of these auxiliary texts could reveal much about the identity of the patron.. 90 x 63 mm. (3 1/2 x 2 1/2"). [343] leaves, single column, 17 lines, in a gothic book hand. Contents: 1r: (blank); 1v: Calendar with two charts and two diagrams in Dutch and Latin; 17r: Various prayers to Christ and meditations on the Passion (including the prayer to the Holy Face of Christ and "O Bone Jesu"); 24r: Hours of the Passion; 45r: Hours of the Virgin; 97-99: (three blank leaves); 100r: Various prayers to the Virgin (including "O Intemerata" and "Obsecro te"); 124r: Hours of the Holy Spirit, with masses; 124r: Weekday Hours, with masses; 188r: Seven Penitential Psalms and Litany; 208r: Office of the Dead; 245r: Suffrages; 274r: Various prayers; 310v: Seven verses of Saint Bernard; 312: (blank); 313r: Reading from 2 John describing the Passion, followed by various prayers; 328r: Prayers(?) in an informal hand; 329r: Fifteen Paternosters in Dutch; 339r: A rubric in Dutch followed by prayers in Dutch. Attractive 17th century dark brown morocco with extensive gilt tooling, covers and spine with a lacey circular motif surrounded by a halo of small flowers, all framed by floral borders and cornerpieces, original straps and brass clasps bearing a shell motif, all edges gilt with a painted (now faded) floral design. Rubrics in red, numerous one-line initials in red and blue, line-fillers in red and blue, "KL" of Kalends and numerous two-line initials gilt on blue and pink ground, many three-line initials and several larger initials (at major intervals) in combinations of red, blue, and gold, with floral decoration, 37 LEAVES WITH FULL FLORAL BORDERS of acanthus leaves, blossoms, gold dots, and vine-stem, and 19 HISTORIATED INITIALS (including one that is more of a half-page miniature). Leather with general minor wear, but the binding entirely sound and extremely pleasing. Borders with a little smudging and trimmed close at the fore edge (though the decoration grazed in just a few cases), vellum with light soiling here and there (more on the first and last few leaves), other quite minor signs of use, but THE CONTENTS VERY CLEAN OVERALL, AND THE HISTORIATED INITIALS WELL PRESERVED. Because of its historiation on such a small scale and its large collection of accessory texts and prayers, this diminutive Book of Hours is of special interest because of its immense decorative charm and textual complexity. In addition to the Hours of the Virgin integral to every Book of Hours, this volume contains three other major prayer cycles: the Hours of the Passion, the Hours of the Holy Spirit, and the Weekday Hours. The last was a specialty of 15th century Flemish Books of Hours and, as here, was often accompanied by an image cycle. As noted by Wieck in "Time Sanctified," the accompanying images reflect the devotion of that particular day: Sunday Hours of the Holy Trinity, Monday Hours of the Dead, Tuesday Hours of the Holy Spirit, Wednesday Hours of All Saints, Thursday Hours of the Holy Sacrament, Friday Hours of the Cross, and the Saturday Hours of the Virgin. The other major cycle of images here belongs to the Hours of the Virgin, and depicts the usual event for each hour: Annunciation, Visitation, Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds, Adoration of the Magi, Presentation in the Temple, Massacre of the Innocents, and the Flight into Egypt. The artist of these initials had very little space to work with, given the small dimensions of the page, but he met the challenge with considerable success; each initial displays a surprising amount of information about the figures and surroundings. The hand is practiced and confident, and the detail work quite clear. The figures make the most of the space they inhabit, and the overall impression is one of great delight and an unexpected degree of character. In addition to the formal cycles mentioned above, the present Book of Hours is further distinguished by an unusually large number of prayers, blessings, and readings, most of which give clues about how this particular book would have been used. Since a Book of Hours like this one would have been highly customizable, further study of these auxiliary texts could reveal much about the identity of the patron.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         Barbus, Ray's bream, Perch and Fundulus [PISCIVM VIVAE ICONES, set]

      Fishes on shore surrounded by flowers against a river landscape in the background. Signed at bottom right:'Adr. Collaert fec. et exc.' captions above the fishes:'Barbus / Brama / Perca / Fundulus'. Numbered on the bottom left: '24' Engraving on paper, trimmed to platemark: total: 122 x 185 mm; state II/2; some dirt and stains on the verso; New Hollstein 1460; W. 28; Guilmard p. 479, 12; Funck p. 219, 9 OMP (Old Masters Prints Black Folders) C (5)

      [Bookseller: Historisch Antiquariaat A.G. van der Ste]
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         Voyage a Surinam. Description des possessions néerlandaises dans la Guyane.Bruxelles, Société des Beaux-Arts, De Wasme et Laurent, 1839. Royal folio (48.5 x 34 cm). With wood-engraved vignette on title. Lithographed additional title and 99 lithographed illustrations on 49 plates, all mounted on China paper. Original black half morocco, spine gilt.

      Muller, America 1460; Sabin 4737; Suriname-cat. UBA 0508a. First edition. The lively plates include topographic views, botanical, ethnographical and zoological subjects, and scenes from the life of the native Indians, the African-Americans and the white colonists. The plates are preceded by a historical survey of Surinam. According to the text on the title-page, there are one hundred plates ( cent dessins ), but the list with illustrations in the book mentions only 99 illustrations, mainly half-page, on 49 plates. It is probable that the full-page lithographed title is included in the cent dessins . The Table des figures and the Table des matières have been bound in, in that order, after the plates. Binding rubbed, some browning or foxing. Good copy of this important work on Surinam.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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         Expositio in epistolas Pauli, illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin with frontispiece miniature possibly by a son of Jean Budé

      1460. A BEAUTIFUL ILLUMINATED COPY OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLES OF PAUL BY HAIMO OF AUXERRE COMMISSIONED BY Jean II Budé. Illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin, France, Paris, c. 1460-1480 and c. 1500. Dimensions 278 x 105 mm. 193 folios, catchwords, guide words, numerous small initial in red and blue, TEN LARGE DECORATED INITIALSin blue or red and gold accented with foliage and flowers, LARGE FRONTISPIECE MINIATURE with acanthus leaf border and bas-de-page the arms of Jean Budé. BINDING: Late eighteenth-century red morocco attributed to Bozerian, with fitted red slipcase. TEXT: This manuscript contains the commentary on the Epistles of Paul by Haimo of Auxerre apart from Romans and 1-2 Corinthians which never intended to be included. Haimo of Auxerre taught at the school of the Benedictine house of Saint-Germain at Auxerre in the ninth-century and is the author of many widely-read commentaries on the Song of Songs, Revelations, and the Minor Prophets, as well as of many sermons. He was best known for his pedagogical skills and anticipated scholasticism by three centuries. ILLUSTRATION: The manuscript opens with a two panel, three-quarter page miniature depicting Saint Paul, on the left, sending his letter via messenger to the Galatians, on the right. The frontispiece was added about 20 to 30 years after the text was completed. Stylistic analysis suggests it was painted in Troyes where it could have been completed by one of the sons of Jean Budé, who were canons at the Cathedral St.-Pierre in Troyes, perhaps at the behest of Jean Budé's son Guillaume. The page bears comparisons with a group of manuscripts painted by an artist active in Troyes at the end of the fifteenth century and during the first quarter of the sixteenth century. The portrayal of Saint Paul as a king with a sealed document may have had personal significance for a Jean Budé and his son Guillaume who began their careers in the French Court as royal secretaries. PROVENANCE: Copied in Troyes, this manuscript belonged to Jean II Budé (1430-1502), royal courtier, bibliophile, and father to the foremost French humanist Guillaume Budé (1468-1540). It displays his owner's inscription and date of acquisition. Then in the collections of Nicolas Thoynard of Orléans (1629-1706), Joseph Barrois (c. 1785-1855), and Bertram Ashburnham, 4th Earl of Ashburnham (1797-1878). Sold at Sotheby's, 9 December 1909, lot 404. Later bought by William Foyle, Beeleigh Abbey (1885-1963) from Kundig, Geneva; it appeared in his sale in London, Christie's, 11 July 2000, lot 24, sold to H.P. Kraus. Subsequently in his sale at Sotheby's (The Inventory of H. P. Kraus), New York, 4-5 December 2003, lot 306.

      [Bookseller: Les Enluminures ]
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         La Scultura Veneziana Gotica (1300-1460) Volume primo Testo e catalogo. Volume secundo Tavole (complete set, 2 volumes in slipcase).

      Venezia, Alfieri, 1976, 1460. 2 vols. Original cloth hardcovers with dustjacket in slipcase. 356 pp. & (4)pp., 871 illustrations on plates; 28.5x25.5 cm. -Minor wear, very good. See picture.

      [Bookseller: Second Hand and Antiquarian Books Emile ]
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         Expositio in epistolas Pauli, illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin with frontispiece miniature possibly by a son of Jean Budé

      A BEAUTIFUL ILLUMINATED COPY OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLES OF PAUL BY HAIMO OF AUXERRE COMMISSIONED BY Jean II Budé. Illuminated manuscript on parchment, in Latin, France, Paris, c. 1460-1480 and c. 1500. Dimensions 278 x 105 mm. 193 folios, catchwords, guide words, numerous small initial in red and blue, TEN LARGE DECORATED INITIALSin blue or red and gold accented with foliage and flowers, LARGE FRONTISPIECE MINIATURE with acanthus leaf border and bas-de-page the arms of Jean Budé. BINDING: Late eighteenth-century red morocco attributed to Bozerian, with fitted red slipcase. TEXT: This manuscript contains the commentary on the Epistles of Paul by Haimo of Auxerre apart from Romans and 1-2 Corinthians which never intended to be included. Haimo of Auxerre taught at the school of the Benedictine house of Saint-Germain at Auxerre in the ninth-century and is the author of many widely-read commentaries on the Song of Songs, Revelations, and the Minor Prophets, as well as of many sermons. He was best known for his pedagogical skills and anticipated scholasticism by three centuries. ILLUSTRATION: The manuscript opens with a two panel, three-quarter page miniature depicting Saint Paul, on the left, sending his letter via messenger to the Galatians, on the right. The frontispiece was added about 20 to 30 years after the text was completed. Stylistic analysis suggests it was painted in Troyes where it could have been completed by one of the sons of Jean Budé, who were canons at the Cathedral St.-Pierre in Troyes, perhaps at the behest of Jean Budé's son Guillaume. The page bears comparisons with a group of manuscripts painted by an artist active in Troyes at the end of the fifteenth century and during the first quarter of the sixteenth century. The portrayal of Saint Paul as a king with a sealed document may have had personal significance for a Jean Budé and his son Guillaume who began their careers in the French Court as royal secretaries. PROVENANCE: Copied in Troyes, this manuscript belonged to Jean II Budé (1430-1502), royal courtier, bibliophile, and father to the foremost French humanist Guillaume Budé (1468-1540). It displays his owner's inscription and date of acquisition. Then in the collections of Nicolas Thoynard of Orléans (1629-1706), Joseph Barrois (c. 1785-1855), and Bertram Ashburnham, 4th Earl of Ashburnham (1797-1878). Sold at Sotheby's, 9 December 1909, lot 404. Later bought by William Foyle, Beeleigh Abbey (1885-1963) from Kundig, Geneva; it appeared in his sale in London, Christie's, 11 July 2000, lot 24, sold to H.P. Kraus. Subsequently in his sale at Sotheby's (The Inventory of H. P. Kraus), New York, 4-5 December 2003, lot 306.

      [Bookseller: Les Enluminures ]
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         Faksimile - Gebetbuch Karls des Kühnen. Los Angeles, Getty Museum, Ms. 37.

      Faksimile: (13,5 cm x 10.5 cm), 318 S., 47 farb. Miniaturen., 360 Zierleisten Kommentarbd.: Gr.8, 310 S., zahlr. Abb., Faksimile: Samteinband m. je vier vergoldeten Eckbeschlägen und je ein vergoldetes Medaillon mit zwei Schließen. Kommentarbd.: OLwd. auf Schuber montiert mit Plexiglasabdeckung., Fakismile: tadell. Kommentarbd.: Deckel Minimal angeschmutzt, tadell. VERGRIFFEN. Nr. 688 der 980 arab. num. Auflage (zusätzl. 80 röm. num. Ex., diese nicht im Handel).Karl der Kühne, Herzog von Burgund liess sich um 1460 vom Buchmaler Lieven van Lathem, dem Wiener Meister der Maria von Burgund sowie dem Schreiber Nicolas Spierinc ein Gebetbuch zum persönlichen Gebrauch anfertigen: das Gebetbuch Karls des Kühnen. Es legt Zeugnis davon ab, daß der mächtigste Mann in Europa auch als Mäzen nicht seinesgleichen hatte - ist doch das Buch Seite für Seite mit Gold ausgestattet! Auf 159 Blättern im Format 124 x 92 mm entfaltet sich in insgesamt 47 Miniaturen die überbordende Pracht burgundischer Bücherliebe. Die zeichnerische Fabulierlust setzt sich bis in die erfindungsreichen Bordüren fort, wo sich zwischen farbigem Akanthus und Goldpollen ungezählte Drolerien, Menschen und Vögel tummeln. Drei Porträts des Auftraggebers belegen die sehr persönliche Beziehung Karls zu seinem Gebetbuch.Auch die Textseiten beeindrucken durch reichen Schmuck. Die feine Kalligraphie wird von mehr als 360 Initialen auf zumeist ziseliertem Goldgrund gegliedert jede Textseite ist zudem mit einer ornamentalen Bordüre verziert. So spiegelt das Gebetbuch Karls des Kühnen Seite für Seite Pracht und Luxus Burgunds wider.Die Künstler: Zeit seines Lebens wirkte Lieven van Lathem als Buchmaler im Kulturraum Flandern, zwischen Gent und Brügge, Antwerpen und Utrecht. Um 1430 geboren, war er zuerst Mitglied der Malergilde in Gent, später, bis zu seinem Tod 1490, Mitglied der Lukasgilde in Antwerpen. Aufgrund seines überragenden Talents wurde er schon früh Hofmaler Herzog Philipps des Guten, des Vaters Karls des Kühnen. Später berief ihn auch Kaiser Maximilian I. an seinen Hof.Gegen Ende des 15. Jahrhunderts galt das flämische Antwerpen als Zentrum der Landschaftsmalerei aber es war van Lathem mit seiner stimmungsvollen Kunst, der den Weg dahin bereitet hatte.Ein Name ist mit der Malschule von Gent-Brügge untrennbar verbunden: der des Wiener Meisters der Maria von Burgund - gerühmt für seine Ausdruckskraft, wenn es darum ging, feine Gesichter oder bewegtes Muskelspiel auf Pergament lebendig werden zu lassen.Seine Identität ist nicht gelüftet, doch vermuten viele Kunsthistoriker in ihm Alexander Bening, den Vater Simon Benings, des letzten großen Meisters aus Flandern. Mit dem Gebetbuch Karls des Kühnen betrat er erstmals die künstlerische Bühne, und schon hier erhält die Kunstwelt einen Eindruck von diesem einmaligen Talent. Als Schreiber für sein Gebetbuch konnte Karl der Kühne mit Nicolas Spierinc Burgunds berühmtesten Kalligraphen verpflichten. Spierinc ist freilich nicht nur die gelungene Schönschrift zu verdanken, er schmückte viele Seiten auch mit wunderbaren Kadellen, also mit Buchstaben, die kunstvoll mit Linien in Schrifttinte verziert wurden. Zum Teil wurden die Kadellen sogar zusätzlich mit mattglänzendem Gold gefüllt - ein Schimmern, das auch im Faksimile originalgetreu wiedergegeben wird.Der Kommentarband vom renommierten Kunsthistoriker Antoine de SchryverBeiliegend die Dokumentationsmappe m 3 faksimilierten Blättern.

      [Bookseller: antiquariat peter petrej]
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         Ivsti Henning. Boehmeri D. Prof. Ivr. Ordinarii In Regia Fridericiana Ivs Ecclesiasticvm Protestantivm : Vsvm Modernvm Ivris Canonici Ivxta Seriem Decretalivm Ostendens, & Ipsis Rervm Argvmentis Illvstrans - 2 Bände: Tome I + 2

      [6] Bl., 1460 S., [28] Bl. // [6] Bl., 1088 S., [36] Bl. : Kupfert., Titelvignette (Kupferst.), gebundene Ausgabe, Orginal-Buchblock, wurden leider nicht mehr weiten eingebunden. Klassiker des evangelischen Kirchenrechts ( jus eccelsiasticum protestantium ) welches die erste systematische Darstellung des evangelischen Kirchenrechts enthält, bezog er sich zwar noch auf das überlieferte kanonische Recht, reformierte es aber für die protestantische Kirche dahingehend, dass die Grundsätze der Reformation von vorreformatorischen Prinzipien und Widerständen und starrer Orthodoxie sowie von reinem Dogmatismus, sowohl der vorreformatorischen als auch der reformatorischen Richtung, verschont blieben. Mitten im Zeitalter der Aufklärung und beeinflusst von dessen Strömungen vertrat er dabei an Stelle eines religiös-gläubigen Fundamentalismus von Rechtssätzen eine zunehmend kritische und wissenschaftliche Entwicklung Religion +++++ 20 Jahre Antiquariat Christmann in Wiesbaden +++++

      [Bookseller: Wiesbadener Antiquariat Christmann]
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         TEXT FROM COMPLINE IN THE HOURS OF THE HOLY SPIRIT

      Bruges, ca. 1460. n. Radiant is the word to describe the historiated initial here, its brilliant colors, shining gold, and pure white conveying the essence of the Holy Spirit.. 218 x 152 mm. (8 5/8 x 6"). Single column, 21 lines in a formal gothic book hand. Rubrics in red, two line fillers in pink and blue with gold accent, one- and two-line initials in burnished gold on a pink and blue ground with white tracery, verso with a floral panel border, RECTO WITH A SIX-LINE HISTORIATED INITIAL in pink and white on a burnished gold ground, its center SHOWING A WHITE DOVE WITH A GOLD NIMBUS AND RADIATING GOLD BEAMS OF LIGHT on a sun-like background of orange and yellow surrounded by blue, the same side WITH AN ANIMATED FULL FLORAL BORDER filled with blue and gold acanthus, sprays of flowers and fruit, and many tiny gold bezants. One corner repaired, just touching tip of full border, minor marginal thumbing, small, faint smear to border, otherwise an excellent leaf--smooth, well-margined, and with vibrant colors and glistening gold. Radiant is the word to describe the historiated initial here, its brilliant colors, shining gold, and pure white conveying the essence of the Holy Spirit.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         Dialoghi di amore composti per Leone medico di natione hebreo, et di poi fatto christiano.

      Kl.-8, 2 Bl., 261 num. Blätter. (Nummerierungssprung von 134 auf 155 (also insgesamt 482 S.), Privat-Ldr- des 18. Jhts., Rückenschild u. Goldpräg. marmorierter Schnitt, Exlibris (Wilmont, Viscount Lisburne) a. Vors., Min. fingerfleckig, tadell. (Aldinensammlung Staatsbibliothek Berlin 559. Druckermarke auf Titel und am Schluss. Jehuda (auch: Juda) ben Isaak Abravanel, oft kurz Abravanel oder Abrabanel genannt, italienisch Leone Ebreo, (* um 1460 in Lissabon + nach 1521 in Neapel) jüdischer Philosoph, Arzt und Dichter aus Portugal. 1483 Vertreibung wegen Hochverrats aus Portugal nach Spanien. Dort Leiter der Finanzverwaltung von Königin Isabella I. Trotzdem Vertreibung 1492 nach Neapel. 1495 Vertreibung wegen antijüdischen Progromen nach Genua. Als aber 1501 auch die Republik Genua judenfeindliche Maßnahmen ergriff erneute Flucht.Rückkehr nach Neapel, Aufstieg zum Leibarzt des Vizekönigs. 1510 Vertreibung nach Venedig. Nochmalige Rückkehr nach Neapel.Abravanel gehörte zu den prominenten Vertretern des Platonismus in der Renaissance. Er verfügte über eine hervorragende humanistische Bildung und kannte sich in der christlichen ebenso wie in der jüdischen und der islamischen philosophischen Tradition aus. Sein Hauptwerk, die Dialoghi d'amore ("Dialoge über die Liebe"), knüpft an Platons Konzept des literarisch kunstvoll gestalteten philosophischen Dialogs an. Wie bei Platon und in der traditionellen belehrenden Dialogliteratur bemühen sich in den Dialoghi d'amore die Gesprächspartner gemeinsam um Erkenntnis. Abravanel wandelt jedoch das herkömmliche Konzept ab, indem er an die Stelle des üblichen Lehrer-Schüler-Verhältnisses der Dialogteilnehmer einen Gedankenaustausch und zugleich geistigen Kampf zweier ebenbürtiger Gesprächspartner setzt. Der erotische Aspekt des Verhältnisses zwischen den beiden Protagonisten, einem verliebten Mann und einer skeptischen, wissensdurstigen Frau, schafft einen lebensnahen Rahmen für die philosophische Auseinandersetzung mit der Theorie der Liebe.

      [Bookseller: antiquariat peter petrej]
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         Das Tierbuch. 2 Bände. Faksimile und Kommentar.

      Standort: FLUR Folio ( 26, 5 x 19 cm). Dunkelgrüner Originalleinenband mit goldgeprägtem Rückentitel in dunkelgrüner Originalleinenkassette mit Deckelschild und Rückentitel. 232 faksimilierte Blätter mit zahlreichen farbigen ( 469 ) Miniaturen bzw. 213 Seiten mit 31 teils ganzseitigen Abbildungen (Kommentarband). Sehr gutes, nahezu verlagsfrisches Exemplar. Faksimilie der Handschrift v. 1460, 2 Bände (Vollfaksimile u. Kommentar- bzw. Einführungsband) in Kassette. In kleiner numerierter Auflage erschienene vollständige Wiedergabe nach der Handschrift (Urb.lat. 276) in der Bibliotheca Apostolica im Vatikan, hier in einem Exemplar der einfacheren Ausstattung in Ganzleinen. Mit dem Kommentarband von Cynthia M. Pyle. Candidus verfasste das Tierbuch um 1460 für Lodovico Gonzaga, 1515 wurde es illuminiert. Bei seinem Werk handelt sich um eine der schönsten und zugleich für die Geschichte der Zoologie wichtigsten naturwissenschaftlichen Buchillustrationen des 15. Jahrhundets. Mit Abbildungen von 450 teils exotischen Tierarten wie Nashorn, Seelöwe und Leopard sowie verschiedenen Fabelwesen (Phoenix, Einhorn etc.). Wundervolles und prächtig ausgestattetes Faksimile eines der wertvollsten zoologischen Manuskripte aus der Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana. Faksimile, Faksimiles, Buchwesen, Buchmalerei

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Carl Wegner]
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         Das Tierbuch des Petrus Candidus : codex urbinas Latinus 276 von. [Die Übers. aus d. Engl. besorgte für d. Teil I Theo Honnef Teil II wurde von Julia Schlechta übers.]

      213 S. :469 Tierminiaturen 27 cm Dunkelgrüner Originalleinenband mit goldgeprägtem Rückentitel in dunkelgrüner Originalleinenkassette mit Deckelschild und Rückentitel, Exemplar der einfacheren Ausstattung in Ganzleinen und losen Faksimilie-Blättern. Exemplar in gutem Erhaltungszustand Faksimile eines der wertvollsten zoologischen Manuskripte aus der Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana. 2 Bde. (Faksimile u. Kommentar- bzw. Einführung-Bd.). 27,5x29 cm. III, 232, (2) Bl. mit 469 kolorierten Tierdarstellungen 213 S. mit 31 teils ganzseitigen Abbildungen. Eine der schönsten Handschriften aus der Vatikanischen Bibliothek ist das mit prächtigen Miniaturen ausgestattete Tierbuch des Petrus Candidus, geschrieben um 1460 für Lodovico Gonzaga, illustriert aber erst im Laufe des 16. Jh. Basierend auf der Tradition antiker Autoren und vor allem des Physiologus werden real existierende Tiere ebenso detailliert beschrieben wie Fabelwesen und von einem kongenialen Maler ins Bild gesetzt Buchkunde 3763050043 +++++ 20 Jahre Antiquariat Christmann in Wiesbaden +++++

      [Bookseller: Wiesbadener Antiquariat Christmann]
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         Wiener Bilderbibel (Bibel) mit Dokumentation - Altes und neues Testament mit den Spätschriften des Alten Testaments - Limitierte Auflage - Exemplar Nr. 1.398 von 1.500 - Ledereinband - rundum-Goldschnitt

      Zustand: wie neu Einzigartige Prachtausgabe der Heiligen Schrift mit über 300 Buchmalereien aus Handschriften aus der Zeit vom frühen 12. Jahrhundert bis zum 15. Jahrhundert, die von der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek normalerweise zum Schutz vor Verfall und Beschädigung unter Verschluss gehalten werden. Die Wiener Bilderbibel wurde in einer strikt limitierten Auflage von 1.500 Exemplaren aufgelegt. Jedes Exemplar ist ein handgefertigtes Unikat mit Rundum-Goldschnitt und Ledereinband. Es erfüllt damit für Sammler und Liebhaber neben dem künstlerischen Anspruch auch die Voraussetzungen für eine sichere und nachhaltige Wertanlage - ein Familienerbstück für Generationen. Die Illustrationen stammen aus ca. 20 Bibelhandschriften, darunter die Neapolitanische Prachtbibel von 1360, die Soudenbalch-Bibel aus Utrecht von 1460, die Historienbibel aus Urach von 1463 und die legendäre Wenzelsbibel von 1389-99: die erste deutsche Bibelübersetzung, die bereits 140 Jahre vor Luther entstand. Ein auf Archivaufnahmen spezialisierter Fotograf hat alle 300 Illustrationen vor Ort aufgenommen. Mit großem technischen Aufwand wurden die Illustrationen dann reproduziert: Dank Golddruck und Patinierung wirken sie absolut originalgetreu. Etwa ein Drittel der Illustrationen wurde sogar im Zuge eines Spezialverfahrens mit Goldfolie bedruckt. Begleitet werden die 300 faszinierenden Darstellungen von der ökumenischen Fassung "Die gute Nachricht" dem einzigen interkonfessionellen Bibeltext. Jedes Exemplar der Wiener Bilderbibel ist ein handgefertigtes Unikat, dessen Herstellung die traditionelle Buchgestaltung des Mittelalters und modernste Technik vereint. Der Einband beispielsweise ist in bewährter Tradition handgearbeitet. Er ist aus hochwertigem Rindsleder gefertigt und auf der Vorderseite und dem Buchrücken mit Echtgoldprägung versehen. Auch die Prägestempel für die dekorative Ornamentik werden nach klassischen Vorlagen von Hand gefertigt. Eine 16-seitige Dokumentationsmappe informiert näher über die Herkunft der Kunstwerke und enthält zwei hochwertige Originalreproduktionen aus der Wiener Bilderbibel. Die Dokumentation liefert neben kunsthistorischen auch biblische Erläuterungen und beleuchtet die herstellungstechnischen Hintergründe. Wiener Bilderbibel, 1072 Seiten, über 300 Illustrationen mit Golddruck bzw. Goldfoliendruck und Patinierung, Rindsledereinband mit Echtgoldprägung, 3-seitiger Goldschnitt mit Punzierung, vergoldete Metallecken und Metallschließe, in Leder gefasstes Leseband, Jedes Exemplar ist handgefertigt und nummeriert. Die erste Ausgabe dieses Werks wurde Papst Benedikt übergeben.

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         Libro de Horas de Gulbenkian. Gulbenkian Stundenbuch Das Stundenbuch aus Poitiers in der Lissabonner Stiftung Gulbenkian

      352 Seiten (172 Folios) mit über 850 Bildmotiven, 39 Seiten mit großen Miniaturen, 24 Seiten mit 4-seitigen Bildbordüren und jew. einem Medaillon in Gold-Camaieu, 248 Seiten mit drei Miniaturen Format 25,2 x 17 cm, gebunden in blauem Samt über Holzdeckeln mit 5 sichtbaren Bünden, Goldschnitt. entstanden ca 1460-65 Dreieck Angers, Tours und Poitiers, Museu Fundcao Calouste Gulbenkian, Lissabon, Ms. L.A. 135 BL Eine Rechnung mit ausgewiesener Mehrwertsteuer liegt Ihrer Bestellung bei.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Karl Heinz Schmitz]
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         TEXT FROM NONE AND VESPERS IN THE HOURS OF THE CROSS

      Bruges, ca. 1460. n. The Crucifixion scene is simple but moving: the Virgin Mary and Saint John stand on either side of the cross, looking mournful, as Christ's head bows in submission to his fate. The Deposition has more action, with Joseph of Arimathea struggling to carry Christ down a ladder as the nails that pierced his hands and feet scatter on the ground. Nicodemus stands by to receive the body, and in an especially affecting touch, the Virgin Mary clutches her dead son's outstretched but lifeless hand.. 218 x 152 mm. (8 5/8 x 6"). Single column, 21 lines in a formal gothic book hand. Rubrics in red, one- and two-line initials in burnished gold on a blue and pink ground with white tracery, EACH SIDE WITH A SIX-LINE HISTORIATED INITIAL in pink with white tracery on a burnished gold ground, ONE DEPICTING THE CRUCIFIXION, THE OTHER THE DEPOSITION, BOTH SIDES WITH A FULL FLORAL BORDER alive with blue and gold acanthus, brightly colored fruit and flowers, and many tiny gold bezants. One upper corner repaired, with slight fading to the adjacent tip of the border, short slit to tail margin, just touching the edge of the border, a couple of mild smudges, otherwise an excellent leaf, clean, smooth, and well-margined, with rich colors, intact paint, and shining gold. The Crucifixion scene is simple but moving: the Virgin Mary and Saint John stand on either side of the cross, looking mournful, as Christ's head bows in submission to his fate. The Deposition has more action, with Joseph of Arimathea struggling to carry Christ down a ladder as the nails that pierced his hands and feet scatter on the ground. Nicodemus stands by to receive the body, and in an especially affecting touch, the Virgin Mary clutches her dead son's outstretched but lifeless hand.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         Epistolae ad Familiares

      - Illuminated manuscript in Latin, written on vellum, possibly written by Ser Pietro di Bernardo Cennini and illuminated by Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico. Italy, Florence, ca. 1460-1470. 270 x 175 mm., ii, 156, ii leaves. Collation: I-XV10, XVI6-1 (last blank cancelled), perpendicular catchwords in hand of the scribe. Modern pencilled foliation including front flyleaf. Written in brown ink in a very fine, humanist minuscule between 37 horizontal and two pairs of vertical lines ruled in pale ink, justification: 195 x 105 mm., rubrics in pale red, two-line initials in dark blue throughout (often several on a page), 16 large (five- to nine-lines) white-vine initials in raised burnished gold, entwined with white-vine leaves infilled in blue, pink and green with three or more dots in white and with marginal extensions up and down the margins, the first with a two-sided border with winged putti carrying a wreath (original coat of arms erased), a bird and a butterfly. Lower corner of opening folio slightly thumbed. A few contemporary marginal notes, erasure at end affected several pages (below explicit on fol. 156v caused rubbing on fols. 155v-156r as well), few minor wormholes mostly in margins, few other creases and marks, generally in very fine condition, complete and with clean wide margins. Binding: late 16th-early 17th century (?) gold-tooled brown morocco, nine raised bands, panel design, perhaps Sicilian (see La Bibliofilía, vol. 68 (1966), pp. 181-183), gilt edges (covers a little worn, small sections missing from head and foot of spine); vellum pastedowns (lifted) from a mid 14th-century Italian manuscript of Aristotle's Politics, Book 4 in Latin translation written in 2 columns. In a modern quarter red morocco fitted box with gilt lettering. PROVENANCE:1. Unidentified original patron, his coat of arms (fol. 2r) erased. 2. Perhaps a Sicilian owner by the late 16th-early 17th century when the manuscript received its present binding, presumably contemporary to the inscriptions on the flyleaf: "Di don Francesco st.st.lia. Di Don Domenico."3. Book-label with initials R.L.A. (gilt on blue).4. Giannalisa Feltrinelli (bookplate; F 159 in her library, her sale Christie's London, 3 December 1997, lot 151 sold to Bernard Quaritch).5. Helmut N. Friedlaender, with his bookplate. His library sold (Christie's New York, 23 April 2001, lot 5). Helmut Friedlaender (1913-2008), American bibliophile and lawyer, was an advisor to the Rosenwald family.SCRIBE: The manuscript is written by one excellent hand in a small humanistic script. Spaces for quotations in Greek are left blank. According to P.O. Kristeller, Iter Italicum V, 1990, p. 346 the scribe was identified by the great expert Albinia de La Mare as Ser Pietro di Bernardo Cennini (1463, see also no. 53451 in the Schoenberg database). He was a prolific Florentine scribe (ca. 1445-84) to whom at least 32 other manuscripts are attributed, the first of which dated 1460 (see Garzelli 1985, pp. 445 & 526-29). Piero Cennini was the son of the first book printer in Florence and a professional notary. He mostly wrote an elegant humanist, cursive hand (contrary to the present manuscript that is written in a minuscule). He copied texts for his own use as well as for clients, especially Hungarian clients such as Archbishop Vitez and Matthias Corvinus. The present manuscript is not listed in Garzelli 1985.TEXT:Epistolae ad familiares (fols. 2r-156v), divided into sixteen books. Book I (fol. 2r), Book II (fol. 11v), Book III (fol. 18v), Book IV (fol. 27v), Book V (fol. 35r), Book VI (fol. 46v), Book VII (fol. 56v), Book VIII (fol. 66r), Book IX (fol. 70v), Book X (fol. 84v), Book XI (fol. 98v), Book XII (fol. 107r), Book XIII (fol. 118r), Book XIV (fol. 130v), Book XV (fol. 140r), Book XVI (fol. 150r).Fol. 156v: Ego vos ad III Kal. videbo, tuosque oculos, etiam si te veniens in medio foro videro, dissaviabor. Me ama. Vale. Marci Tullii Ciceronis Epistolarum Familiarium Liber Sextusdecimus et ultimus [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc.]
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         TEXT FROM TERCE IN THE HOURS OF THE CROSS

      Bruges, ca. 1460. n. The small but remarkably detailed scene here shows Jesus tied to a red pillar in the middle of a large room, its tessellated floor, stone walls, and barrel ceiling adding depth. On either side of Christ is a soldier in helmet, tunic, and leg armor with an upraised cat-o'-nine-tails. Tiny red welts have already appeared on Christ's body, but his expression is gentle and forgiving. One soldier shows enthusiasm for his task, while the bored expression on the face of the other brings to mind the phrase "banality of evil.". 218 x 152 mm. (8 5/8 x 6"). Single column, 21 lines in a formal gothic book hand. Rubrics in red, one- and two-line initials in burnished gold on a blue and pink ground with white tracery, recto with a pink and burnished gold bar border on the left of the text, with sprays of flowers bursting from either end, and a floral panel border on the right; verso with A SIX-LINE HISTORIATED INITIAL in pink with white tracery on a burnished gold ground, CONTAINING A DEPICTION OF THE SCOURGING OF CHRIST, the same side with A FULL FLORAL BORDER filled with blue and gold acanthus, sprays of flowers and fruit, and many tiny gold bezants. One corner repaired, with consequent blurring to a tiny bit of the border, minor marginal smudges, otherwise a fine leaf, generally clean and smooth, with comfortable margins, vibrant colors, and glowing gold. The small but remarkably detailed scene here shows Jesus tied to a red pillar in the middle of a large room, its tessellated floor, stone walls, and barrel ceiling adding depth. On either side of Christ is a soldier in helmet, tunic, and leg armor with an upraised cat-o'-nine-tails. Tiny red welts have already appeared on Christ's body, but his expression is gentle and forgiving. One soldier shows enthusiasm for his task, while the bored expression on the face of the other brings to mind the phrase "banality of evil."

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         De Civitate Dei

      Illuminated manuscript on vellum, decorated in the style of Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico. Italy, Florence: ca. 1460. 220 x 158 mm., 347 leaves, on vellum. Collation: I-II8, III-XXXIV10, XXXV8, XXXVI4-1. Foliated as 1-343 (omitting fols. 34bis, 114bis, 145bis, & 238bis). Justification 159 x 95 mm., ruling invisible, 2 columns of 42 lines, written in dark brown ink, rubrics in red, in a small, rounded Italian book hand. Running titles in alternately red and blue letters, all catchwords present. Decorated initials throughout, 3 lines high and often more to a page in red and blue with decorative pen-flourishes extending into the margins, 22 large (6 lines high) illuminated initials, painted on burnished gold panel grounds infield with gold and colors with fine tracery in white and yellow and with scrolling colored "leafy" marginal extensions with clusters of gold bezants within pen-flourishes; one large (7 lines high, 25 x 28 mm.) historiated initial and two-sided border (fol. 17r) enclosing the head and shoulders of St. Augustine. Lower margin of the opening leaf of De Civitate (fol. 17r; perhaps formerly holding a coat-of-arms) cut away and replaced by blank vellum. Some early reader's marks (Notabilia) in a humanistic hand, slight damp-stains in upper margins at end, some pages a bit rubbed, but generally in fine condition. Binding: ca. 1700, Italian, brown-red morocco, triple fillets tooled in blind to a double frame, in the four corners & in the centre flower motives. Cover slightly rubbed, flyleaves renewed. PROVENANCE:1. Florence, ca. 1460, however, the coat of arms of the original patron is lost.2. Lucca, Biblioteca Minutoli Tegrini (dissolved in 1871). Its stamp "Di casa Minutoli Tegrimi" erased but earlier deciphered and identified by comparison with Alexander & De la Mare 1969, pl. XXII and p. 53; a list of other Minutoli-Tegrimi manuscripts in England on p. 55, no. 2. The collection of Conte Eugenio Minutoli-Tegrimi of Lucca was sold in 1871.3. London, School of Jewish Studies (Sotheby's, June 20, 1995, lot 71).4. European private collection.TEXTA complete manuscript copy of De Civitate Dei, the most important work written by Saint Augustine (354-430), one of the four great Fathers of the Latin Church.Fols. 1-15r: List of chapter headings per bookFol. 15rb-va: Interea cum Roma Gothorum irruptioneFol. 16r-v: blankFol. 17: Incipit liber primus: Gloriosissimam Civitatem Dei … Book II (fol. 30v), III (fol. 41), IV (fol. 54), V (fol. 66), VI (fol. 80), VII (fol. 88v), VIII (fol. 101v), IX (fol. 114v), X (fol. 122), XI (fol. 138v), XII (fol. 150v), XIII (fol. 162v), XIV (fol. 173), XV (fol. 187v), XVI (fol. 204v), XVII (fol. 224v), XVIII (fol. 239), XIX (fol. 263v), XX (fol. 279v), XXI (fol. 301v), XXII (fol. 319v).Fol. 342v: Explicit liber XXII beati Augustini episcopi De Civitate Dei Saint Augustine (354-430), designed this text as a great apologetic treatise in vindication of Christianity and the Christian Church. The City of God was written between 413 and 426 and represents the first Christian philosophy of history. "The impulse to the writing of the 22 books of the 'City of God', which was spread over several years, arose out of the fall of Rome to Alaric in 410. The event had caused consternation throughout the civilized world, and Augustine, who himself was profoundly moved, conceived the book as a reply to pagans who maintained that the fall of the city was due to the abolition of the heathen worship. It led him to deal with the fundamental contrast between Christianity and the world, and has made it the supreme exposition of a Christian philosophy of history."-Cross, F.L., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, p. 107. "The first five books deal with the polytheism of Rome, the second five with Greek philosophy, particularly Platonism and Neo-Platonism (which are seen as leading inevitably to Christianity in which their problems are finally resolved), and the last twelve books with the history of time and eternity as set out in the Bible. History is conceived as the struggle between two communities - the Civitas coelestis of those inspired by the love of God, leading to contempt of self, and the Civitas terrena or diaboli of those living according to man, which may lead to contempt of God. This struggle of the two conceptions of life had dominated Augustine's personal life and is here transferred to the wider field of world history. Both these powers fighting for the allegiance of the human soul are inextricably intermingled in society's earthly institutions; but history is understood as a continuous evolution of the divine purpose and all forces work towards redemption of man by God's grace, the central feature of St Augustine's theology. It is for this reason that he is considered as the founder of a new science, to which Voltaire assigned the name 'philosophy of history'. For the first time a comprehensive survey of human history is presented… "In economics Augustine praised labour as a means towards moral perfection; interest charges on money were not allowed under his system, but trade could be carried on, if selling was done honestly and a 'just price' was charged and paid. Many of the medieval regulations about commerce and prices were derived from these ideas, and his contrasting description of a just ruler (imbued with piety, humility, fairness) and the tyrant or Antichrist (impiety, craving for glory) powerfully influenced Renaissance thought… "'The City of God' pervaded the whole Middle Ages…The book remained authoritative until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries…The idea of international law was partly derived from the book."-Printing & the Mind of Man 3-(1st printed edition: Subiaco, 1467).ILLUMINATION:22 large illuminated initials, painted on burnished gold panel grounds infield with gold and colours with fine tracery in white and yellow and with scrolling coloured "leafy" marginal extensions with clusters of gold bezants within pen-flourishes. On fol. 17r one large historiated initial and two-sided border enclosing the head and shoulders of the author of the text, St. Augustine dressed as bishop with mitre and crozier on a gold panel with foliate and floral border along the inner and upper margins with gold bezants and brown penwork. The painted decoration throughout the book, including the historiated initial and border decoration on the opening page (fol. 17) is in the style of Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico, who ran a workshop in Florence which was active from ca. 1452 until 1484. His production was vast and varied, illuminating theological, literary, historical, and devotional books. This influential text is presented here in a very professional, clearly written book well preserved with wide margins. Preserved in a morocco-backed box.LITERATURE:In the Schoenberg database nos. 364 and 11843, 13513Further reading:Mirella Levi d'Ancona, Miniatura e miniatori a Firenze dal XIV al XVI secolo. Florence 1962, pp. 109-115.J.J.G. Alexander and A. C. de la Mare, The Italian Manuscripts in the Library of Major J. R. Abbey, London 1969 (for the stamp "Di casa Minutoli-Tegrimi" as it occurs in J.A. 3216 on pl. XXII and p. 53).Milvia Bollati, in: Dizionario biografico dei miniatori italiani. Secoli IX-XVI, a cura di Milvia Bollati, Milan 2004, pp. 228-230.A. Garzelli, "Francesco Antonio del Chierico," in The Grove Dictionary of Art, ed. by Jane Turner. New York 1996, vol. 11, pp. 685-687.Jonathan J. G. Alexander (ed.), The Painted Page: Italian Renaissance Book Illumination 1450-1550, New York 1994.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Epistolae ad Familiares

      Illuminated manuscript in Latin, written on vellum, possibly written by Ser Pietro di Bernardo Cennini and illuminated by Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico. Italy, Florence, ca. 1460-1470. 270 x 175 mm., ii, 156, ii leaves. Collation: I-XV10, XVI6-1 (last blank cancelled), perpendicular catchwords in hand of the scribe. Modern pencilled foliation including front flyleaf. Written in brown ink in a very fine, humanist minuscule between 37 horizontal and two pairs of vertical lines ruled in pale ink, justification: 195 x 105 mm., rubrics in pale red, two-line initials in dark blue throughout (often several on a page), 16 large (five- to nine-lines) white-vine initials in raised burnished gold, entwined with white-vine leaves infilled in blue, pink and green with three or more dots in white and with marginal extensions up and down the margins, the first with a two-sided border with winged putti carrying a wreath (original coat of arms erased), a bird and a butterfly. Lower corner of opening folio slightly thumbed. A few contemporary marginal notes, erasure at end affected several pages (below explicit on fol. 156v caused rubbing on fols. 155v-156r as well), few minor wormholes mostly in margins, few other creases and marks, generally in very fine condition, complete and with clean wide margins. Binding: late 16th-early 17th century (?) gold-tooled brown morocco, nine raised bands, panel design, perhaps Sicilian (see La Bibliofilía, vol. 68 (1966), pp. 181-183), gilt edges (covers a little worn, small sections missing from head and foot of spine); vellum pastedowns (lifted) from a mid 14th-century Italian manuscript of Aristotle's Politics, Book 4 in Latin translation written in 2 columns. In a modern quarter red morocco fitted box with gilt lettering. PROVENANCE:1. Unidentified original patron, his coat of arms (fol. 2r) erased. 2. Perhaps a Sicilian owner by the late 16th-early 17th century when the manuscript received its present binding, presumably contemporary to the inscriptions on the flyleaf: "Di don Francesco st.st.lia. Di Don Domenico."3. Book-label with initials R.L.A. (gilt on blue).4. Giannalisa Feltrinelli (bookplate; F 159 in her library, her sale Christie's London, 3 December 1997, lot 151 sold to Bernard Quaritch).5. Helmut N. Friedlaender, with his bookplate. His library sold (Christie's New York, 23 April 2001, lot 5). Helmut Friedlaender (1913-2008), American bibliophile and lawyer, was an advisor to the Rosenwald family.SCRIBE: The manuscript is written by one excellent hand in a small humanistic script. Spaces for quotations in Greek are left blank. According to P.O. Kristeller, Iter Italicum V, 1990, p. 346 the scribe was identified by the great expert Albinia de La Mare as Ser Pietro di Bernardo Cennini (1463, see also no. 53451 in the Schoenberg database). He was a prolific Florentine scribe (ca. 1445-84) to whom at least 32 other manuscripts are attributed, the first of which dated 1460 (see Garzelli 1985, pp. 445 & 526-29). Piero Cennini was the son of the first book printer in Florence and a professional notary. He mostly wrote an elegant humanist, cursive hand (contrary to the present manuscript that is written in a minuscule). He copied texts for his own use as well as for clients, especially Hungarian clients such as Archbishop Vitez and Matthias Corvinus. The present manuscript is not listed in Garzelli 1985.TEXT:Epistolae ad familiares (fols. 2r-156v), divided into sixteen books. Book I (fol. 2r), Book II (fol. 11v), Book III (fol. 18v), Book IV (fol. 27v), Book V (fol. 35r), Book VI (fol. 46v), Book VII (fol. 56v), Book VIII (fol. 66r), Book IX (fol. 70v), Book X (fol. 84v), Book XI (fol. 98v), Book XII (fol. 107r), Book XIII (fol. 118r), Book XIV (fol. 130v), Book XV (fol. 140r), Book XVI (fol. 150r).Fol. 156v: Ego vos ad III Kal. videbo, tuosque oculos, etiam si te veniens in medio foro videro, dissaviabor. Me ama. Vale. Marci Tullii Ciceronis Epistolarum Familiarium Liber Sextusdecimus et ultimus feliciter Explicit… [following line partially erased repetition of the author's name et Marci Tullii…]. A second hand repeats the last sentence of the last letter. Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), lived during the final phase of the Roman Republic at the time of the rise, dictatorship and death of Julius Cesar. Much is known of this Roman lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher as his character and time shine through the mass of his works that survived the ages. After the murder of Julius Cesar (44 B.C.), Cicero pleaded for the restoration of the Republic in his famous Philippics. Being an enemy of Marc Antony, he was killed in Rome in 43 B.C. Cicero's works, but most specially his letters reveal his role in the politics and turmoil of his time. This codex containing the sixteen books of Epistolae ad familiares comprises more than ninety letters Cicero wrote to friends and relatives over a period of c. 63-43 B.C. Some letters are addressed to public persons such as Pompeius and Caesar, others are private such as those to his wife Terentia. Originally compsed without thought of publication, the letters - serious, informative and gossipy - give an intimate insight into Cicero's life and opinions. In the middle of the 14th century, Petrarch was only acquainted with a small collection of Cicero's letters, but Coluccio Salutati, in 1389, stumbled upon a codex with the 16 books of letters ad familiares (in a 9th-century manuscript in Vercelli). Coluccio Salutati (1374-1406), the humanist chancellor of Florence and correspondent of Petrarch, guided young scholars such as Poggio Bracciolini and Leonardo Bruni. He invited the Byzantine Manuel Chrysoloras to Florence, bringing with him the knowledge of Greek and Greek literature. Salutati amassed a great collection of manuscripts and in searching for classical manuscripts, he made a number of notable discoveries, of which Cicero's Epistolae ad familiares was the most important as it overturned the entire medieval conception of Cicero, the Roman statesman. Salutati also took up Cicero's ideas "in the self" (Greenblatt 2012, p. 124), when he, in his historical studies tied Florence's origin to the Roman Republic, not to the Roman Empire. Since Salutati brought the Vercelli manuscript to Florence, the city became a major centre of distribution of Cicero's text.ILLUMINATION: All books open with a fine, large gold initial, surrounded by white vines on a blue ground, highlighted with soft-rose and green. The vine decoration on the frontispiece is divided into two elements, in the outside border with a bird in green and in the lower margin with two putti holding a wreath that once contained the coat of arms of the original patron, and a butterfly watching from the end and top of the decoration. This handsome border on the openings page and the finely executed so-called white-vine initials are characteristic of the style of Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico of around 1460 and the decoration of this manuscript can securely be attributed to his workshop. Levi D'Ancona 1962 observed that the putti of Francesco d'Antonio can be recognized by their "pollaiuolesca," and the strong emphasis given to the movement of the hips. Also painted birds appear in his decoration, moving through the white spirals, sometimes in the act of catching something with their long beak. Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico was one of the leading illuminators in Florence (ca. 1452-d. 1484). The present decoration can be compared, for instance, with the initials in other Cicero manuscripts such as Ms. Burgess 48 (Eugene, University of Oregon Library) and in Ms. Digby 231 (Oxford, Bodleian Library) and two Corvinian manuscripts, one in Budapest, UL, Ms. Lat 10 (Tertullian, Adversus Marcionem), the other in Vienna, ONB, Cod. Lat. 22 (Titus Livius, Ab Urbe condita; see: http://www.gicas.net/burgess48.html). Moreover, the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich holds a comparable Corvinus manuscript illuminated in the same style and possibly written by the same hand (CLM 310, Demosthenes, Orationes and Aeschines, Epistola, Florence, ca. 1465). Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico's production was vast and varied (see Levi D'Ancona 1962, pp. 108-116 and De La Mare 1996, p. 180). He illuminated literary, historical, and devotional books, from small format Books of Hours to large humanist texts. He worked not only work for the Medicis but also for the condottiere and bibliophile Federigo da Montefeltro (d. 1482), and the renowned bookseller Vespasiano da Bisticci, through whom he acquired patrons beyond Italy, among whom Ferdinand I of Naples, Louis XI of France, and Matthias Corvinus, King of Hungary (1443-90). The latter's passion for books and learning was greatly influenced by his tutor János Vitéz (d. 1472), archbishop of Esztergom. The Bibliotheca Corviniana, in its time one of the finest libraries, was dispersed after 1561 and manuscripts are now found all over the world. Several Corviniana may originally have come from Vitéz. Infrared research might perhaps reveal traces of the original coat of arms erased on fol.1 and therefore point into the direction of the first patron of this present very fine humanist manuscript.LITERATURE:P. Lejay, "Coluccio di Pierio di Salutati," in Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: 1913.S. Greenblatt, The Swerve. How the World became Modern. New York: 2012, pp. 123-26.M. Levi d'Ancona, Miniatura e miniatori a Firenze dal XIV al XVI secolo. Florence 1962, pp. 108-16.A. de la Mare, "New Research on Humanistic Scribes in Florence," in: A. Garzelli, Miniatura fiorentina del Rinascimento, 1440-1525 : un primo censimento, Florence 1985, pp. 445 & 526-29.A. Garzelli, "Francesco Antonio del Chierico," in The Grove Dictionary of Art, ed. by Jane Turner, New York 1996, Vol. 11, pp. 685-87.Further reading:The Painted Page: Italian Renaissance Book Illumination 1450-1550, edited by Jonathan J. G. Alexander, New York 1994. See also for details of birds and putti: no 50.Painting and Illumination in early Renaissance Florence, 1300-1450, edited by Laurence B. Kanter et al., New York 1994 (exhib. cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art).A. C. de la Mare, "Vespasiano da Bisticci as Producer of Classical Manuscripts in Fifteenth-Century Florence," in: Medieval Manuscripts of the Latin Classics: Production and Use. Proceedings of the Seminar in the History of the Book to 1500, Leyden 1993. Edited by C.A. Chavannes-Mazel and M. M. Smith, Los Altos Hills, 1996, pp. 167-207.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
 26.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         TEXT FROM THE GOSPEL LESSONS

      ca. 1460, Flanders [Bruges?] - 220 x 154 mm. (8 3/4 x 6"). Single column, 19 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Rubrics in red, a gold and pink bar along the left side of the text on recto, one two-line gilt initial against a blue and pink ground, head and tail of recto with border of acanthus leaves and flower buds, and A VERY PLEASING MINIATURE OF SAINT MARK (measuring 49 x 47 mm.). Small chip to one corner of the vellum, text on miniature side a little faded (but nothing illegible), margins a touch soiled, but still excellent, with the miniature in fine condition, retaining all its original detail and appeal. By the mid-14th century, the "Gospel Lessons" had become a typical feature in Books of Hours and were typically accompanied by portraits of the Evangelists and their attributes. The Lessons would often have been the first section encountered by the Medieval reader, immediately following the Calendar and consisting of four short readings from each of the Gospels. Consistent with convention, Mark is shown seated here (either in a study or a scriptorium) in the act of writing, and accompanied by his attribute, the lion. Although the basic imagery of this scene rarely varies, scholars like Roger Wieck have long noted how "the practices and equipment of medieval scribes are reflected in these miniatures" ("Time Sanctified," p. 55). Our artist carefully depicts a tilted writing surface attached to the saint's chair with metal clamps, and with two wells (presumably for ink) on the right side. Mark wields a stylus and works on a long scroll that falls off the end of the table, a red initial just barely visible near its top edge. The miniature is deftly painted and highly detailed, despite its relatively small size. The artist depicts surroundings that are well defined, with a bright red tile floor, rich blue tapestry, multicolored columns, and a view of the outdoors. By the mid-14th century, the "Gospel Lessons" had become a typical feature in Books of Hours and were typically accompanied by portraits of the Evangelists and their attributes. The Lessons would often have been the first section encountered by the Medieval reader, immediately following the Calendar and consisting of four short readings from each of the Gospels. Consistent with convention, Mark is shown seated here (either in a study or a scriptorium) in the act of writing, and accompanied by his attribute, the lion. Although the basic imagery of this scene rarely varies, scholars like Roger Wieck have long noted how "the practices and equipment of medieval scribes are reflected in these miniatures" ("Time Sanctified," p. 55). Our artist carefully depicts a tilted writing surface attached to the saint's chair with metal clamps, and with two wells (presumably for ink) on the right side. Mark wields a stylus and works on a long scroll that falls off the end of the table, a red initial just barely visible near its top edge. The miniature is deftly painted and highly detailed, despite its relatively small size. The artist depicts surroundings that are well defined, with a bright red tile floor, rich blue tapestry, multicolored columns, and a view of the outdoors.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
 27.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


         TEXT FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER

      Paris, ca. 1460. n. The miniatures here are very delicately painted, with details of the landscapes and the garments highlighted with liquid gold. This extensive use of gold--for major feast days, for decorative border elements, and even for the hundreds of seeds being sown(!)--suggests that the book from which this leaf was cut may have been done as a commission for a specific person of high rank, since it would have been very costly.. 195 x 143 mm. (7 3/4 x 5 1/2"). Single column, 16 lines in a gothic book hand. Minor feast days in red and blue, major feasts in gold, numerous gold and painted line fillers, the five "A" initials and the "KL" highly decorative and painted pink and blue against a gold background, gold and pink bar surrounding the text on three sides, BOTH SIDES OF THE LEAF WITH EXTRAVAGANTLY DECORATIVE BOTANICAL FULL BORDERS with two small birds hidden within, and INCORPORATING TWO MEDALLION MINIATURES DEPICTING THE LABOR OF THE MONTH (SOWING) AND THE SIGN OF THE ZODIAC (SCORPIO) FOR OCTOBER. IN VERY FINE, FRESH CONDITION, with gold and paint extraordinarily bright. The miniatures here are very delicately painted, with details of the landscapes and the garments highlighted with liquid gold. This extensive use of gold--for major feast days, for decorative border elements, and even for the hundreds of seeds being sown(!)--suggests that the book from which this leaf was cut may have been done as a commission for a specific person of high rank, since it would have been very costly.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         THE MONTHS OF FEBRUARY THROUGH JUNE AND OCTOBER THROUGH DECEMBER

      France, ca. 1460. n. 158 x 108 mm. (6 1/4 x 4 1/4"). 17 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Saints' names in red or blue, month and major feast days in brushed gold, two-line kalends in burnished gold on a pink and blue ground with white tracery, delicate hairline stems extending from the "KL" into the left margin, bearing blue and pink flowers and berries along with burnished gold ivy leaves. A couple of leaves with small, faint brown spot in the margin, the kalends lightly rubbed with minor loss of color or gold, otherwise clean, smooth, and bright.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         TEXT FROM A PRAYER TO THE TRINITY IN FRENCH

      ca. 1460, Paris - 153 x 110 mm. (6 x 4 3/8"). Single column, 14 lines of text in a fine gothic book hand. One-line initial in burnished gold on a pink and blue ground with white tracery, a two-line initial and a three-line initial in pink with white tracery on a ground of burnished gold, the center filled with twining blue vines bearing pink and scarlet flowers, verso with a rinceau panel border featuring twining hairline stems bearing burnished gold ivy leaves and fruit, blue and gold acanthus leaves, and flowers, recto WITH AN ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURE OF THE HOLY TRINITY SURROUNDED BY THE HEAVENLY HOST, this and the accompanying text enclosed by a pink, blue, and burnished gold bar border on one side, and a brushed gold bar border with pink lotus flowers on two sides, the whole surrounded by A FULL RINCEAU BORDER DENSE WITH ACANTHUS LEAVES, FOLIAGE, FRUIT, FLOWERS, AND TINY GOLD BERRIES on hairline stems. A little paint flaked from the book held by the Trinity, a couple of small spots in the margin, otherwise in fine condition--clean and smooth, with comfortable margins, and bright gold. The Trinity is shown here seated on a canopied throne, with God the Son, his hand raised in blessing, to the left of the Father. The latter, in a towering crown, holds a gold orb, and the Father and Son together support a large book opened between them. The dove of the Holy Spirit hovers above the book, radiating golden beams. The Trinity is flanked on both sides by cherubim and seraphim in rich red and soft yellow. It is the rendering of this angelic ambiance that elevates the level of aesthetic achievement here: both red and yellow celestial beings are given a ghostly appearance, as if appearing out of a filmy yellow or a densely red fog. The artistic qualities as a whole suggest that this leaf comes from a manuscript commissioned by a person of significant means. The Trinity is shown here seated on a canopied throne, with God the Son, his hand raised in blessing, to the left of the Father. The latter, in a towering crown, holds a gold orb, and the Father and Son together support a large book opened between them. The dove of the Holy Spirit hovers above the book, radiating golden beams. The Trinity is flanked on both sides by cherubim and seraphim in rich red and soft yellow. It is the rendering of this angelic ambiance that elevates the level of aesthetic achievement here: both red and yellow celestial beings are given a ghostly appearance, as if appearing out of a filmy yellow or a densely red fog. The artistic qualities as a whole suggest that this leaf comes from a manuscript commissioned by a person of significant means.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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         Magnifique bandeau ornemental sur vélin

      circa 1460 - Vélin. 4,5 x 25 cm. Bandeau à thème de feuille de vigne stylisée travaillée à l'or à la feuille et de composition florale et fruitière (myosotis, fraises, feuilles de houx) aux gouaches rouge, verte, bleue. Chargée en son centre d'un personnage chimérique mi oiseau mi page désignant dans sa main gauche un ciboire d'or, disposé dans une acanthe à la gouache et à l'or liquide. Cette délicate composition datant de la seconde moitié du XVe siècle (circa 1460) ornait probablement la marge inférieure d'un grand manuscrit enluminé.

      [Bookseller: L'Oeil de Mercure]
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         TEXT FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER

      Paris: , ca. 1460. Paris, ca. 1460. n. The miniatures here are very delicately painted, with details of the landscapes and the garments highlighted with liquid gold. This extensive use of gold--for major feast days, for decorative border elements, and even for the hundreds of seeds being sown(!)--suggests that the book from which this leaf was cut may have been done as a commission for a specific person of high rank, since it would have been very costly.. 195 x 143 mm. (7 3/4 x 5 1/2"). Single column, 16 lines in a gothic book hand. Minor feast days in red and blue, major feasts in gold, numerous gold and painted line fillers, the five "A" initials and the "KL" highly decorative and painted pink and blue against a gold background, gold and pink bar surrounding the text on three sides, BOTH SIDES OF THE LEAF WITH EXTRAVAGANTLY DECORATIVE BOTANICAL FULL BORDERS with two small birds hidden within, and INCORPORATING TWO MEDALLION MINIATURES DEPICTING THE LABOR OF THE MONTH (SOWING) AND THE SIGN OF THE ZODIAC (SCORPIO) FOR OCTOBER.IN VERY FINE, FRESH CONDITION, with gold and paint extraordinarily bright.The miniatures here are very delicately painted, with details of the landscapes and the garments highlighted with liquid gold. This extensive use of gold--for major feast days, for decorative border elements, and even for the hundreds of seeds being sown(!)--suggests that the book from which this leaf was cut may have been done as a commission for a specific person of high rank, since it would have been very costly.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 32.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         TEXT FROM A PRAYER TO THE TRINITY IN FRENCH

      Paris, ca. 1460. n. The Trinity is shown here seated on a canopied throne, with God the Son, his hand raised in blessing, to the left of the Father. The latter, in a towering crown, holds a gold orb, and the Father and Son together support a large book opened between them. The dove of the Holy Spirit hovers above the book, radiating golden beams. The Trinity is flanked on both sides by cherubim and seraphim in rich red and soft yellow. It is the rendering of this angelic ambiance that elevates the level of aesthetic achievement here: both red and yellow celestial beings are given a ghostly appearance, as if appearing out of a filmy yellow or a densely red fog. The artistic qualities as a whole suggest that this leaf comes from a manuscript commissioned by a person of significant means.. 153 x 110 mm. (6 x 4 3/8"). Single column, 14 lines of text in a fine gothic book hand. One-line initial in burnished gold on a pink and blue ground with white tracery, a two-line initial and a three-line initial in pink with white tracery on a ground of burnished gold, the center filled with twining blue vines bearing pink and scarlet flowers, verso with a rinceau panel border featuring twining hairline stems bearing burnished gold ivy leaves and fruit, blue and gold acanthus leaves, and flowers, recto WITH AN ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURE OF THE HOLY TRINITY SURROUNDED BY THE HEAVENLY HOST, this and the accompanying text enclosed by a pink, blue, and burnished gold bar border on one side, and a brushed gold bar border with pink lotus flowers on two sides, the whole surrounded by A FULL RINCEAU BORDER DENSE WITH ACANTHUS LEAVES, FOLIAGE, FRUIT, FLOWERS, AND TINY GOLD BERRIES on hairline stems. A little paint flaked from the book held by the Trinity, a couple of small spots in the margin, otherwise in fine condition--clean and smooth, with comfortable margins, and bright gold. The Trinity is shown here seated on a canopied throne, with God the Son, his hand raised in blessing, to the left of the Father. The latter, in a towering crown, holds a gold orb, and the Father and Son together support a large book opened between them. The dove of the Holy Spirit hovers above the book, radiating golden beams. The Trinity is flanked on both sides by cherubim and seraphim in rich red and soft yellow. It is the rendering of this angelic ambiance that elevates the level of aesthetic achievement here: both red and yellow celestial beings are given a ghostly appearance, as if appearing out of a filmy yellow or a densely red fog. The artistic qualities as a whole suggest that this leaf comes from a manuscript commissioned by a person of significant means.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 33.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES

      Bruges, ca. 1460. n. The smaller size of these miniatures does not necessarily decrease their impact. Both are quite detailed, but the mood of each is very different. Mary Magdalene stands alone in a meadow, the picture of tranquillity, with a curving river, distant hills, and forests in the background. Her hair flows long and free over her gold-embroidered blue cloak, and she carries a golden jar of the scented unguent with which she had gone to anoint Christ's body, only to find him risen from the dead. Saint Catherine, on the other hand, looks more like a warrior queen than a virgin martyr. She is a regal figure in robes of gold, ermine, and red beneath a blue cloak, a crown linked with her nimbus. She stands defiantly before the spiked wheel that failed to kill her, and her nemesis Emperor Maxentius grovels at her feet as she grips the sword used to behead her as if she will raise it to exact justice. Though she stands outdoors with hills and trees in the distance, there is a gold-embroidered red backdrop with a stylized sky above. Catherine was a much-revered Medieval saint and was believed to be a powerful intercessor, which perhaps accounts for her martial aspect here as she prepares to fight on behalf of those who implore her.. 218 x 152 mm. (8 5/8 x 6"). Single column, 21 lines in a formal gothic book hand. Rubrics in red, one line filler in pink and blue accented with a gold dot, four two- or three-line initials in burnished gold on a blue and pink ground with white tracery, recto with a small (approximately 60 x 40 mm.) ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURE OF MARY MAGDALENE holding a golden jar of unguent, VERSO WITH A SIMILAR MINIATURE OF SAINT CATHERINE with her wheel, the miniatures both outlined in burnished gold, BOTH SIDES WITH ANIMATED FULL FLORAL BORDER filled with blue and gold acanthus, sprays of flowers and fruit, and many tiny gold bezants. One upper corner repaired, with slight fading just to tip of one border, tiny abrasion to background of one initial, a couple of faint smudges, otherwise an excellent leaf, generally clean and smooth with ample margins, vivid colors, and bright gold. The smaller size of these miniatures does not necessarily decrease their impact. Both are quite detailed, but the mood of each is very different. Mary Magdalene stands alone in a meadow, the picture of tranquillity, with a curving river, distant hills, and forests in the background. Her hair flows long and free over her gold-embroidered blue cloak, and she carries a golden jar of the scented unguent with which she had gone to anoint Christ's body, only to find him risen from the dead. Saint Catherine, on the other hand, looks more like a warrior queen than a virgin martyr. She is a regal figure in robes of gold, ermine, and red beneath a blue cloak, a crown linked with her nimbus. She stands defiantly before the spiked wheel that failed to kill her, and her nemesis Emperor Maxentius grovels at her feet as she grips the sword used to behead her as if she will raise it to exact justice. Though she stands outdoors with hills and trees in the distance, there is a gold-embroidered red backdrop with a stylized sky above. Catherine was a much-revered Medieval saint and was believed to be a powerful intercessor, which perhaps accounts for her martial aspect here as she prepares to fight on behalf of those who implore her.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 34.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         TEXT FROM THE GOSPEL LESSONS

      Flanders [Bruges?], ca. 1460. n. By the mid-14th century, the "Gospel Lessons" had become a typical feature in Books of Hours and were typically accompanied by portraits of the Evangelists and their attributes. The Lessons would often have been the first section encountered by the Medieval reader, immediately following the Calendar and consisting of four short readings from each of the Gospels. Consistent with convention, Mark is shown seated here (either in a study or a scriptorium) in the act of writing, and accompanied by his attribute, the lion. Although the basic imagery of this scene rarely varies, scholars like Roger Wieck have long noted how "the practices and equipment of medieval scribes are reflected in these miniatures" ("Time Sanctified," p. 55). Our artist carefully depicts a tilted writing surface attached to the saint's chair with metal clamps, and with two wells (presumably for ink) on the right side. Mark wields a stylus and works on a long scroll that falls off the end of the table, a red initial just barely visible near its top edge. The miniature is deftly painted and highly detailed, despite its relatively small size. The artist depicts surroundings that are well defined, with a bright red tile floor, rich blue tapestry, multicolored columns, and a view of the outdoors.. 220 x 154 mm. (8 3/4 x 6"). Single column, 19 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Rubrics in red, a gold and pink bar along the left side of the text on recto, one two-line gilt initial against a blue and pink ground, head and tail of recto with border of acanthus leaves and flower buds, and A VERY PLEASING MINIATURE OF SAINT MARK (measuring 49 x 47 mm.). Small chip to one corner of the vellum, text on miniature side a little faded (but nothing illegible), margins a touch soiled, but still excellent, with the miniature in fine condition, retaining all its original detail and appeal. By the mid-14th century, the "Gospel Lessons" had become a typical feature in Books of Hours and were typically accompanied by portraits of the Evangelists and their attributes. The Lessons would often have been the first section encountered by the Medieval reader, immediately following the Calendar and consisting of four short readings from each of the Gospels. Consistent with convention, Mark is shown seated here (either in a study or a scriptorium) in the act of writing, and accompanied by his attribute, the lion. Although the basic imagery of this scene rarely varies, scholars like Roger Wieck have long noted how "the practices and equipment of medieval scribes are reflected in these miniatures" ("Time Sanctified," p. 55). Our artist carefully depicts a tilted writing surface attached to the saint's chair with metal clamps, and with two wells (presumably for ink) on the right side. Mark wields a stylus and works on a long scroll that falls off the end of the table, a red initial just barely visible near its top edge. The miniature is deftly painted and highly detailed, despite its relatively small size. The artist depicts surroundings that are well defined, with a bright red tile floor, rich blue tapestry, multicolored columns, and a view of the outdoors.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 35.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         TEXT FROM A PRAYER TO THE TRINITY IN FRENCH

      Paris: , ca. 1460. Paris, ca. 1460. n. The Trinity is shown here seated on a canopied throne, with God the Son, his hand raised in blessing, to the left of the Father. The latter, in a towering crown, holds a gold orb, and the Father and Son together support a large book opened between them. The dove of the Holy Spirit hovers above the book, radiating golden beams. The Trinity is flanked on both sides by cherubim and seraphim in rich red and soft yellow. It is the rendering of this angelic ambiance that elevates the level of aesthetic achievement here: both red and yellow celestial beings are given a ghostly appearance, as if appearing out of a filmy yellow or a densely red fog. The artistic qualities as a whole suggest that this leaf comes from a manuscript commissioned by a person of significant means.. 153 x 110 mm. (6 x 4 3/8"). Single column, 14 lines of text in a fine gothic book hand. One-line initial in burnished gold on a pink and blue ground with white tracery, a two-line initial and a three-line initial in pink with white tracery on a ground of burnished gold, the center filled with twining blue vines bearing pink and scarlet flowers, verso with a rinceau panel border featuring twining hairline stems bearing burnished gold ivy leaves and fruit, blue and gold acanthus leaves, and flowers, recto WITH AN ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURE OF THE HOLY TRINITY SURROUNDED BY THE HEAVENLY HOST, this and the accompanying text enclosed by a pink, blue, and burnished gold bar border on one side, and a brushed gold bar border with pink lotus flowers on two sides, the whole surrounded by A FULL RINCEAU BORDER DENSE WITH ACANTHUS LEAVES, FOLIAGE, FRUIT, FLOWERS, AND TINY GOLD BERRIES on hairline stems.A little paint flaked from the book held by the Trinity, a couple of small spots in the margin, otherwise in fine condition--clean and smooth, with comfortable margins, and bright gold.The Trinity is shown here seated on a canopied throne, with God the Son, his hand raised in blessing, to the left of the Father. The latter, in a towering crown, holds a gold orb, and the Father and Son together support a large book opened between them. The dove of the Holy Spirit hovers above the book, radiating golden beams. The Trinity is flanked on both sides by cherubim and seraphim in rich red and soft yellow. It is the rendering of this angelic ambiance that elevates the level of aesthetic achievement here: both red and yellow celestial beings are given a ghostly appearance, as if appearing out of a filmy yellow or a densely red fog. The artistic qualities as a whole suggest that this leaf comes from a manuscript commissioned by a person of significant means.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 36.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         Histoire de Louys XI - Roy de France. Aux armes de Foucault.

      Et des choses mémorables advenues de son Règne, depuis l'an 1460 iusque à 1483. Aultrement dicte, la Chronique Scandaleuse. Escrite par un Greffier de l'Hostel de ville de Paris.Imprimée sur le vray Original, 1620. 396 pp. + table des matières. Portrait du roi Louys XI en frontispice. La Chronique de Jean de Roye (1425-1495) embrasse tout le règne le Louis XI. Source de premier ordre pour l'histoire de Paris en particulier, elle a été reproduite en partie dans les Grandes Chroniques de France et par Antoine Vérard dans le Chronique Martiniane. Reliure plein veau havane de l'époque. Dos à nerfs orné et doré. Aux armes de Nicolas Joseph Foucault au centre des plats. Avec son ex-libris. Tranches rouges. Quelques légers frottements sur les plats. Pas de rousseur. Bon état. Format in-12° (16x10).

      [Bookseller: Livres et Collections P. Commerot]
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         Publius Vergilius Maro. Bucolica. Georgica. Aeneis.

      Vicent Carcia / Bibliotheca Rara: deutscher Kommentarband Antonie Wlosok., Rom / Neapel um 1460 (Faksimile-Nachdruck jüngeren Datums). - 552 Seiten im Format 31,5 x 22,2cm, mit 38 Miniaturen, davon 11 ganzseitig. Um sein großartiges Heldenepos, die Aeneis, das er in Neapel begonnen hatte, zu vollenden, unternahm Publius Vergilius Maro, kurz Vergil, eine Studienfahrt nach Griechenland und Kleinasien. Auf der Rückreise mit dem Schiff wurde er krank und verstarb 19 v. Chr. in Brindisi. Von den unter seinem Namen überlieferten Werken sind die Eclogae oder Bucolica, die Georgica und die Aeneis die einzigen Texte, deren Echtheit unumstritten ist. Die Bucolica, die von Theokrits Werk Eidyllia inspiriert wurden, bestehen aus zehn kurzen Gedichten, wobei nur zwei mehr als hundert Verse haben. All diese zeichnen sich mit Ausnahme des vierten Gedichtes durch ihren dyllischbukolischen Charakter aus. Die Georgica, ein Werk von nicht zu übertreffender Schönheit, hatte zum Ziel, dem Herrscher Augustus dabei zu helfen, eine Rückbesinnung auf die Kräfte der Natur zu fördern. Sie ist in vier Bücher unterteilt: Im ersten Buch behandelt Vergil den Ackerbau und schließt einen Landsmannkalender und die Witterungszeichen ein, im zweiten wird die Baumzucht, vor allem der Weinbau dargestellt, im dritten die Viehzucht und im vierten die Apikultur: die Bienenzucht. Bl Eine Rechnung mit ausgewiesener Mehrwertsteuer liegt Ihrer Bestellung bei. Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 2100

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Karl Heinz Schmitz]
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        Prayer Book; illuminated manuscript on parchment with 34 large semi-grisaille miniatures and 5 small miniatures by the Master of the Grisailles Fleurdelisées; 10 large coloured miniatures by the Master of Johannes Gielemans.

      THIS COLLECTION OF PRAYERS COMPILED TO SUPPORT PERSONAL DEVOTION IS PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED WITH FORTY-NINE MINIATURES OF GREAT ORIGINALITY. Illuminated manuscript on parchment in Latin (with some French), Belgium, Brussels, c. 1460 and Lille, c. 1475, 234 folios, 129 x 85 mm., lacking at least five leaves, written in a bâtarde script, 2-line gold initials, 3- to 4-line initials in blue on burnished gold grounds, each prayer begins with a decorated initial and an illuminated bracket-border with hairline tendrils, floral, leafy and fruit designs, FIVE SMALL and THIRTY-FOUR LARGE ARCH-TOPPED SEMI-GRISAILLE MINIATURES set in illuminated borders on reserved grounds with colored floral and acanthus decoration, TEN LARGE COLORED MINIATURES, all but eight with full borders. BINDING: Old red velvet (rebacked and resewn). TEXT: A highly original collection of prayers and devotions, grouped around themes including the sufferings of Christ, invocations for protection against a great variety of woes, the Virgin, and suffrages to saints. Likely compiled in Belgium, near Brussels, in an environment favorable to the spiritual and devotional movement known as the Devotio Moderna. ILLUSTRATION: Includes a very large number of miniatures, colored or semi-grisaille, by two distinct hands. The colored miniatures of the Apostles (ff. 139-151), are by the Master of Johannes Gielemans, active in Brussels and possibly also Ghent during the third and fourth quarters of the fifteenth century. All other miniatures are by The Master of the Grisailles Fleurdelisées and workshop, apparently painted later. Most have borders in keeping with those associated with the Gielemans Master but the miniature depicting a "Scribe at his desk" (f. 42) has a characteristic gold frame decorated with fleur-de-lys, the hallmark of the Master of the Grisailles Fleurdelisées, active in Lille c.1460-1480 for bibliophiles like Louis of Gruuthuse. 10 large colored miniatures of the Apostles, ff. 139, 141, 142, 142v, 145, 147, 148, 149v, 150, 151. 34 large semi-grisaille miniatures: f. 30v, Cross on an altar; f. 36, Trinity; f. 42, Scribe; f. 49v, Cross; f. 64, Pope Benedict XII; f. 65, Man praying before an image of the Trinity; f. 86, Pietà; f. 92v, John the Baptist; f. 104v, Elevation of the Host; f. 133v, Bernardino; f.134v, Michael; f. 136, Ursula and companions; f. 138v, Christ washing the feet of the Apostles; f. 153, Jerome; f.155v, Crucifixion; f. 158, Sebastian; f. 160, Erasmus; f.162v, Adrian; f. 164, Anne holding the Virgin and Child; f. 165, Anthony Abbot; f. 166, Nicholas; f. 168, Catherine; f. 170, Barbara; f. 173v, Apollonia; f. 174, Christopher; f. 189, Monstrance on an altar; f. 194, Presentation in the Temple; f. 196v, Virgin and Child; f. 198, Virgin seated with a book; Child (Jesus?) in the window; f. 199, Virgin restraining the Child; f. 203v, Virgin suckling the Child; f. 206, Virgin seated, Child standing; f. 209v, Annunciation; f. 220v, Virgin under a baldachin. Five small semi-grisaille miniatures (ff. 53, 54v, 56, 57v, 61v) of Christ holding the instruments of the Passion. PROVENANCE: Copied and painted in or around Brussels based on script and style of miniatures, with a second campaign of miniatures added a decade or so later, perhaps in Lille. Belonged to Claude de Menostey, receiver of the artillery for Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy (1470-1477); with a "livre de raison" recording the births in 1478 and 1480 of his children. Ex libris dated 1646 on f. 234v of a priest named Jacobus Godsteers (or Godsleers), attached to a church in Bruges. Allan Heywood Bright (1862-1941). CONDITION: Slight wear to a few miniatures (e.g. ff. 141, 155v, 168) and borders, text or initials worn on a few leaves, staining, ff.146-148, some trimmed borders, overall fine condition. Full description and photographs available (BOH 110).

      [Bookseller: Les Enluminures ]
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